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Uskali Mäki [67]U. Maki [4]
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Profile: Uskali Mäki (University of Helsinki)
  1. Aki Lehtinen, Uskali Mäki & Caterina Marchionni (2014). Introduction to the Special Issue: Papers From the IX INEM Conference in Helsinki. Journal of Economic Methodology 21 (1):1-2.
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  2. Uskali Mäki (2014). Scientific Imperialism: Difficulties in Definition, Identification, and Assessment. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 27 (3):325-339.
  3. Uskali Mäki (2013). Contested Modelling: The Case of Economics. In Ulrich Gähde, Stephan Hartmann & Jörn Henning Wolf (eds.), Models, Simulations, and the Reduction of Complexity. Walter de Gruyter. 87-106.
  4. Uskali Mäki (2013). Mark Blaug's Unrealistic Crusade for Realistic Economics. Erasmus Journal for Philosophy and Economics 6 (3):87-103.
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  5. Uskali Mäki (2013). Maailma markkinoina. Universaalin talousontologian ytimessä ja rajoilla. In Ilkka Niiniluoto, Risto Vilkko & Jaakko Kuorikoski (eds.), Talous ja filosofia. Gaudeamus. 101-123.
    "The world as markets. At the core and boundaries of a universal economic ontology".
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  6. Uskali Mäki (2013). On a Paradox of Truth, or How Not to Obscure the Issue of Whether Explanatory Models Can Be True. Journal of Economic Methodology 20 (3):268 - 279.
    It is argued that Reiss (2012) fails to refute attempts to resolve the paradox of false explanatory models. His article fails to provide an articulate conception of what exactly the presumed paradox is, it suffers from uncontrolled ambiguities and inconsistencies, and it fails to adequately address accounts of economic models that might contribute to reconciling their apparent falsehood and explanatoriness. Some details in my account of how apparently false models may explain are clarified.
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  7. Uskali Mäki (2013). Performativity: Saving Austin From Mackenzie. In Vassilios Karakostas & Dennis Dieks (eds.), EPSA11 Perspectives and Foundational Problems in Philosophy of Science. Springer. 443-453.
    The new economic sociology claims to have adopted the notion of performativity from J.L Austin, has put it in new uses, and has given it new meanings. This is now spreading and has created another vogue term in the social and human sciences. The term is taken to cover all sorts of aspects in the ways in which the use of social scientific theories have consequences for the social world. The paper argues that the expansive use of 'performativity' obscures the (...)
     
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  8. Uskali Mäki (ed.) (2012). Handbook of the Philosophy of Economics.
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  9. Uskali Mäki (2012). On the Philosophy of the New Kiosk Economics of Everything. Journal of Economic Methodology 19 (3):219-230.
    The article suggests a list of principles that guide this new genre of popular writing in and on economics: the new kiosk economics of everything. These well-selling books seek to show how the simple ideas of economics are able to reveal hidden mechanisms that unify a surprising variety of everyday phenomena and by doing so entertain their readers and improve the public image of economics. It is also argued that there is a special limited sense in which this qualifies as (...)
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  10. Uskali Mäki (2012). Realism and Antirealism About Economics. In , Handbook of the Philosophy of Economics. 3--24.
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  11. Uskali Mäki, Dov M. Gabbay, Paul Thagard & John Woods (eds.) (2012). Philosophy of Economics. North Holland.
    This volume serves as a detailed introduction for those new to the field as well as a rich source of new insights and potential research agendas for those already engaged with the philosophy of economics.
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  12. Uskali Mäki (2011). Homo economicus ja marginalismin perintö. In Virtanen Akseli & Heiskala Risto (eds.), Talous ja yhteiskuntateoria I. Vanhan maailman talous ja suuri murros. Gaudeamus.
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  13. Uskali Mäki (2011). Models and the Locus of Their Truth. Synthese 180 (1):47 - 63.
    If models can be true, where is their truth located? Giere (Explaining science, University of Chicago Press, Chicago, 1998) has suggested an account of theoretical models on which models themselves are not truth-valued. The paper suggests modifying Giere’s account without going all the way to purely pragmatic conceptions of truth—while giving pragmatics a prominent role in modeling and truth-acquisition. The strategy of the paper is to ask: if I want to relocate truth inside models, how do I get it, what (...)
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  14. Uskali Mäki (2011). Puzzled by Realism: A Response to Deichsel. Erasmus Journal for Philosophy and Economics 4 (1):42-52.
    No realist project in and about economics is close to completion. There are many open issues that remain to be addressed and resolved. Simon Deichsel (2011) has written a healthy challenge that should offer some useful inspiration to anyone interested in assessing and perhaps contributing to the realist projects. He argues against realism and in support of some sort of anti-realism. My response first deals with some conceptual issues regarding the very ideas of realism and anti-realism. I will then discuss (...)
     
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  15. Uskali Mäki (2011). Scientific Realism as a Challenge to Economics (and Vice Versa). Journal of Economic Methodology 18 (1):1-12.
    The implications of scientific realism in regard to economics depend on what one takes scientific realism to mean and on whether one lets its contents to depend on the peculiar characteristics of the discipline of economics. Here a revisionist line is adopted and scientific realism is reduced to a minimal version that is able to accommodate as large a portion of science as possible. Among other things, characterizations of minimal realism do not require, as standard formulations of scientific realism do, (...)
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  16. Uskali Mäki (2011). Scientific Realism and Some Russia. In Kahla Elina (ed.), Between Utopia and Apocalypse: Essays on Social Theory and Russia. Aleksanteri Institute.
     
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  17. Uskali Mäki (2011). The Truth of False Idealizations in Modeling. In Paul Humphreys & Cyrille Imbert (eds.), Models, Simulations, and Representations. Routledge.
    Modeling involves the use of false idealizations, yet there is typically a belief or hope that modeling somehow manages to deliver true information about the world. The paper discusses one possible way of reconciling truth and falsehood in modeling. The key trick is to relocate truth claims by reinterpreting an apparently false idealizing assumption in order to make clear what possibly true assertion is intended when using it. These include interpretations in terms of negligibility, applicability, tractability, early-step, and more. Elaborations (...)
     
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  18. Uskali Mäki & Caterina Marchionni (2011). Economics as Usual: Geographical Economics Shaped by Disciplinary Constraints. In John B. Davis & D. Wade Hands (eds.), The Elgar Companion to Recent Economic Methodology. Edward Elgar Publishers. 188.
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  19. Uskali Mäki & Caterina Marchionni (2011). Is Geographical Economics Imperializing Economic Geography? Journal of Economic Geography 11 (4):645-665.
    Geographical economics (also known as the ‘new economic geography’) is an approach developed within economics dealing with space and geography, issues previously neglected by the mainstream of the discipline. Some practitioners in neighbouring fields traditionally concerned with spatial issues (descriptively) characterized it as—and (normatively) blamed it for—intellectual imperialism. We provide a nuanced analysis of the alleged imperialism of geographical economics and investigate whether the form of imperialism it allegedly instantiates is to be resisted and on what grounds. From both descriptive (...)
     
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  20. Michael Weisberg, Samir Okasha & Uskali Mäki (2011). Modeling in Biology and Economics. Biology and Philosophy 26 (5):613-615.
  21. Uskali Mäki (2010). Introduction. Journal of Economic Methodology 17 (1):1-1.
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  22. Uskali Mäki (2010). Models and Truth. In. In M. Dorato M. Suàrez (ed.), Epsa Epistemology and Methodology of Science. Springer. 177--187.
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  23. Uskali Mäki (2010). When Economics Meets Neuroscience: Hype and Hope. Journal of Economic Methodology 17 (2):107-117.
    This is a paper on interdisciplinarity and rhetoric. Neuroeconomics is hype, but this does not rule out entertaining hopes about its capacity to produce some desirable consequences. Its "disciplinary conventions" are characterized as those of a young interdisciplinary field. Its rhetorical advantages are identified, and its rhetorical excesses are put in perspective and conditionally excused. Its evidential roles are emphasized, and they are shown to be limited in alleviating the under-constraint issue due to the difficulty of using fMRI properly.
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  24. Uskali Mäki (2009). Economics Imperialism: Concept and Constraints. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 39 (3):351-380.
    The paper seeks to offer [1] an explication of a concept of economics imperialism, focusing on its epistemic aspects; and [2] criteria for its normative assessment. In regard to [1], the defining notion is that of explanatory unification across disciplinary boundaries. As to [2], three kinds of constraints are proposed. An ontological constraint requires an increased degree of ontological unification in contrast to mere derivational unification. An axiological constraint derives from variation in the perceived relative significance of the facts explained. (...)
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  25. Uskali Mäki (2009). Reading the Methodological Essay in Twentieth Century Economics: Map of Multiple Perspectives. In , The methodology of positive economics : Reflections on the Milton Friedman legacy. Cambridge University Press.
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  26. Uskali Mäki (2009). Unrealistic Assumptions and Unnecessary Confusions : Rereading and Rewriting F53 as a Realist Statement. In , The methodology of positive economics : Reflections on the Milton Friedman legacy. Cambridge University Press.
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  27. Uskali Mäki (2009). Models and Truth: The Functional Decomposition Approach. In Mauricio Suárez, Miklós Rédei & Mauro Dorato (eds.), EPSA Epistemology and Methodology of Science: Launch of the European Philosophy of Science Association. Springer.
  28. Uskali Mäki (2009). MISSing the World. Models as Isolations and Credible Surrogate Systems. Erkenntnis 70 (1):29 - 43.
    This article shows how the MISS account of models—as isolations and surrogate systems—accommodates and elaborates Sugden’s account of models as credible worlds and Hausman’s account of models as explorations. Theoretical models typically isolate by means of idealization, and they are representatives of some target system, which prompts issues of resemblance between the two to arise. Models as representations are constrained both ontologically (by their targets) and pragmatically (by the purposes and audiences of the modeller), and these relations are coordinated by (...)
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  29. Uskali Mäki (2009). MISSing the World: Models as Isolations, Representations, and Credible Worlds. Erkenntnis 70 (1):29-43.
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  30. Uskali Mäki (2009). Realistic Realism About Unrealistic Models. In Harold Kincaid & Don Ross (eds.), The Oxford handbook of philosophy of economics. Oxford University Press.
     
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  31. Uskali Mäki (ed.) (2009). The Methodology of Positive Economics : Reflections on the Milton Friedman Legacy. Cambridge University Press.
     
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  32. Uskali Mäki & Caterina Marchionni (2009). On the Structure of Explanatory Unification: The Case of Geographical Economics. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 40 (2):185-195.
  33. Uskali Mäki (2008). Putnam's Realisms: A View From the Social Sciences. In Sami Pihlström, Panu Raatikainen & Matti Sintonen (eds.), Approaching Truth: Essays in Honour of Ilkka Niiniluoto. College Publications.
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  34. Uskali Mäki (2008). Economics. In Martin Curd & Stathis Psillos (eds.), The Routledge companion to philosophy of science. Routledge.
     
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  35. Uskali Mäki (2008). Filosofia y metodologia an la economia. In Juan José Jardón Urrieta (ed.), Temas de Teoria Economica y so Metodo. Universidade de Santiago de Compostela.
    Este documento analiza las siguientes cuestiones: 1) La metodología de la economía y su actual institucionalización. 2) La definición de Economía. 3) Las perspectivas de los economistas acerca de la Economía, sus métodos y justificación. 4) Comprobación y progreso: Popper y Lakatos.5) Los modelos y sus supuestos. 6) Persuasión retórica y verdad. 7) La Economía como un recurso para la Filosofía de la Ciencia. 8) Expansionismo explicativo y relaciones interdisciplinares.
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  36. Uskali Mäki (2008). Method and Appraisal in Economics, 1976–2006. Journal of Economic Methodology 15 (4):409-423.
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  37. Uskali Mäki (2008). Realism. In Daniel M. Hausman (ed.), The Philosophy of Economics. Cambridge University Press.
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  38. Uskali Mäki (2008). Scientific Realism and Ontology. In Steven N. Durlauf & Lawrence E. Blume (eds.), The New Palgrave Dictionary of Economics : volume 7 : real balances - stochastic volatility models. Palgrave Macmillan.
     
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  39. Uskali Mäki (2006). Remarks on Models and Their Truth. Storia Del Pensiero Economico. Nuova Serie 3 (1):7-19.
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  40. U. Maki (2005). Experiments Versus Models: New Phenomena, Inference and Surprise. Journal of Economic Methodology 12:303-315.
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  41. Uskali Mäki (2005). Models Are Experiments, Experiments Are Models. Journal of Economic Methodology 12 (2):303-315.
    A model is a representation of something beyond itself in the sense of being used as a representative of that something, and in prompting questions of resemblance between the model and that something. Models are substitute systems that are directly examined in order to indirectly acquire information about their target systems. An experiment is an arrangement seeking to isolate a fragment of the world by controlling for causally relevant things outside that fragment. It is suggested that many theoretical models are (...)
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  42. Uskali Mäki (2005). Reglobalizing Realism by Going Local, or (How) Should Our Formulations of Scientific Realism Be Informed About the Sciences? Erkenntnis 63 (2):231 - 251.
    In order to examine the fit between realism and science, one needs to address two issues: the unit of science question (realism about which parts of science?) and the contents of realism question (which realism about science?). Answering these questions is a matter of conceptual and empirical inquiry by way local case studies. Instead of the more ordinary abstract and global scientific realism, what we get is a doubly local scientific realism based on a bottom-up strategy. Representative formulations of the (...)
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  43. Uskali Mäki (2004). Economic Epistemology: Hopes and Horrors. Episteme 1 (3):211-222.
  44. Uskali Mäki (2003). 'The Methodology of Positive Economics' (1953) Does Not Give Usthemethodology of Positive Economics. Journal of Economic Methodology 10 (4):495-505.
    It is argued that rather than a well defined F?Twist, Milton Friedman's ?Methodology of positive economics? offers an F?Mix: a pool of ambiguous and inconsistent ingredients that can be used for putting together a number of different methodological positions. This concerns issues such as the very concept of being unrealistic, the goal of predictive tests, the as?if formulation of theories, explanatory unification, social construction, and more. Both friends and foes of Friedman's essay have ignored its open?ended unclarities. Their removal may (...)
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  45. Uskali Maki (2002). 4 Some Nonreasons for Nonrealism About Economics. In Uskali Mäki (ed.), Fact and Fiction in Economics: Models, Realism and Social Construction. Cambridge University Press. 90.
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  46. Uskali Mäki (ed.) (2002). Fact and Fiction in Economics: Models, Realism and Social Construction. Cambridge University Press.
    Bringing together some of the leading figures in the field of economic methodology and philosophy, this collection provides a thoughtful and balanced overview of the current state of debate about the status of economic knowledge. Representing the most current thinking on a topic of enduring interest to economists and philosophers and other social scientists, the book is notable for the extent to which authors from opposing schools of thought engage seriously with their opponents.
     
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  47. Uskali Mäki (2002). Symposium on Explanations and Social Ontology 2: Explanatory Ecumenism and Economics Imperialism. Economics and Philosophy 18 (2):235-257.
    In a series of insightful publications, Philip Pettit and Frank Jackson have argued for an explanatory ecumenism that is designed to justify a variety of types of social scientific explanation of different , including structural and rational choice explanations. Their arguments are put in terms of different kinds of explanatory information; the distinction between causal efficacy, causal relevance and explanatory relevance within their program model of explanation; and virtual reality and resilience explanation. The arguments are here assessed from the point (...)
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  48. U. Maki (2001). Explanatory Unification: Double and Doubtful. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 31 (4):488-506.
    Explanatory unification—the urge to “explain much by little”—serves as an ideal of theorizing not only in natural sciences but also in the social sciences, most notably in economics. The ideal is occasionally challenged by appealing to the complexity and diversity of social systems and processes in space and time. This article proposes to accommodate such doubts by making a distinction between two kinds of unification and suggesting that while such doubts may be justified in regard to mere derivational unification (which (...)
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