1. Ullrich Wagner, Lisa Handke, Denise Dörfel & Henrik Walter (2012). An Experimental Decision-Making Paradigm to Distinguish Guilt and Regret and Their Self-Regulating Function Via Loss Averse Choice Behavior. Frontiers in Psychology 3.
    Both guilt and regret typically result from counterfactual evaluations of personal choices that caused a negative outcome and are thought to regulate human decisions by people’s motivation to avoid these emotions. Despite these similarities, studies asking people to describe typical situations of guilt and regret identified the social dimension as a fundamental distinguishing factor, showing that guilt but not regret specifically occurs for choices in interpersonal (social) contexts. However, an experimental paradigm to investigate this distinction systematically by inducing emotions of (...)
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  2. Ullrich Wagner, Steffen Gais & Jan Born (2005). Refinements and Confinements in a Two-Stage Model of Memory Consolidation. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (6):857-858.
    Matthew Walker's model overcomes the unrefined classical concept of consolidation as a unitary process. Presently still confined in its scope to selective data mainly referring to procedural motor learning, the model nonetheless provides a valuable starting point for further refinements, which would be required for a more comprehensive account of different types and aspects of human memory consolidation.
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  3. Jan Born & Ullrich Wagner (2004). Awareness in Memory: Being Explicit About the Role of Sleep. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 8 (6):242-244.