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Profile: Ulrich Meyer (Colgate University)
  1. Ulrich Meyer (2013). Counterpart Theory and the Actuality Operator. Mind 122 (485):27-42.
    Fara and Williamson (Mind, 2005) argue that counterpart theory is unable to account for modal claims that use an actuality operator. This paper argues otherwise. Rather than provide a different counterpart translation of the actuality operator itself, the solution presented here starts out with a quantified modal logic in which the actuality operator is redundant, and then translates the sentences of this logic into claims of counterpart theory.
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  2. Ulrich Meyer (2013). Modal Property Comprehension. Synthese 190 (4):693-707.
    To define new property terms, we combine already familiar ones by means of certain logical operations. Given suitable constraints, these operations may presumably include the resources of first-order logic: truth-functional sentence connectives and quantification over objects. What is far less clear is whether we can also use modal operators for this purpose. This paper clarifies what is involved in this question, and argues in favor of modal property definitions.
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  3. Ulrich Meyer (2013). The Nature of Time. Clarendon Press.
    Ulrich Meyer defends a novel theory about the nature of time, and argues against the consensus view that time and space are fundamentally alike. He presents the first comprehensive defense of a 'modal' account, which emphasizes the similarities between times and possible worlds in modal logic, and is easily reconciled with the theory of relativity.
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  4. Ulrich Meyer (2012). Review of Berit Broogard, Transient Truths: An Essay in the Metaphysics of Propositions (Oxford, 2012). [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 201212.
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  5. Ulrich Meyer (2011). Review of Joseph Keim Campbell, Michael O'Rourke, Harry Silverstein (Eds.), Time and Identity. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2011 (1).
  6. Ulrich Meyer (2011). Times as Abstractions. In Adrian Bardon (ed.), The Future of the Philosophy of Time. Routledge. 41--55.
    Instead of accepting instants of time as metaphysically basic entities, many philosophers regard them as abstractions from something else. There is the Russell-Whitehead view that times are maximal classes of simultaneous events; the linguistic ersatzer's proposal that times are maximally consistent sets of sentences or propositions; and the view that times are made up of temporal parts of material objects. This paper discusses the advantages and disadvantages of these various proposals and concludes in favor of a particular version of linguistic (...)
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  7. Ulrich Meyer (2011). Time and Modality. In Craig Callender (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Time. Oxford University Press. 91--121.
    With the rigorous development of modal logic in the first half of the twentieth century, it became custom amongst philosophers to characterize different views about necessity and possibility in terms of rival axiomatic systems for the modal operators ‘ ’ (‘possibly’) and ‘ ’ (‘necessarily’). From the late 1950s onwards, Arthur Prior began to argue that temporal distinctions ought to be given a similar treatment, in terms of axiomatic systems for sentential tense operators, such as ‘P’ (‘it was the case (...)
     
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  8. Ulrich Meyer (2011). Tense and Modality. In Craig Callender (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Time. Oup Oxford.
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  9. St Augustine, John Bigelow, Craig Bourne, William Lane Craig, Thomas Crisp, Matthew Davidson, Rafael De Clercq, M. Oreste Fiocco, Mark Hinchliff, Simon Keller, Ernâni Magalhães, J. M. E. McTaggart, Trenton Merricks, Ulrich Meyer, L. Nathan Oaklander, Arthur Prior, Hilary Putnam & Dean Zimmerman (2010). Presentism: Essential Readings. Lexington Books.
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  10. Ulrich Meyer (2009). 'Now' and 'Then' in Tense Logic. Journal of Philosophical Logic 38 (2):229-247.
    According to Hans Kamp and Frank Vlach, the two-dimensional tense operators “now” and “then” are ineliminable in quantified tense logic. This is often adduced as an argument against tense logic, and in favor of an extensional account that makes use of explicit quantification over times. The aim of this paper is to defend tense logic against this attack. It shows that “now” and “then” are eliminable in quantified tense logic, provided we endow it with enough quantificational structure. The operators might (...)
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  11. Ulrich Meyer (2009). Review of Yuval Dolev, Time and Realism: Metaphysical and Antimetaphysical Perspectives (The MIT Press, 2007). [REVIEW] Iyyun 58:92--101.
  12. Ulrich Meyer (2009). Times in Tense Logic. Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 50 (2):201--19.
    This paper explains how to obtain quantification over times in a tense logic in which all temporal distinctions are ultimately spelled out in terms of the two simple tense operators “it was the case that” and “it will be the case that.” The account of times defended here is similar to what is known as “linguistic ersatzism” about possible worlds, but there are noteworthy differences between these two cases. For example, while linguistic ersatzism would support actualism, the view of times (...)
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  13. Ulrich Meyer (2006). Worlds and Times. Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 47 (1):25--37.
    There are many parallels between the role of possible worlds in modal logic and that of times in tense logic. But the similarities only go so far, and it is important to note where the two come apart. This paper argues that even though worlds and times play similar roles in the model theories of modal and tense logic, there is no tense analogue of the possible-worlds analysis of modal operators. An important corollary of this result is that presentism cannot (...)
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  14. Ulrich Meyer (2005). Dummett on the Time-Continuum. Philosophy 80 (311):135 - 140.
    Michael Dummett claims that the classical model of time as a continuum of instants has to be rejected. In his view, “it allows as possibilities what reason rules out, and leaves it to the contingent laws of physics to rule out what a good model of physical reality would not even be able to describe.” This paper argues otherwise.
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  15. Ulrich Meyer (2005). The Presentist's Dilemma. Philosophical Studies 122 (3):213 - 225.
    This paper defends three theses: (i) that presentism is either trivial or untenable; (ii) that the debate between tensed and tenseless theories of time is not about the status of presentism; and (iii) that there is no temporal analogue of the modal thesis of actualism.
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  16. Ulrich Meyer (2004). How to Apply Mathematics. Erkenntnis 61 (1):17-28.
    This paper presents a novel account of applied mathematics. It shows how we can distinguish the physical content from the mathematical form of a scientific theory even in cases where the mathematics applied is indispensable and cannot be eliminated by paraphrase.
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  17. Ulrich Meyer (2003). The Metaphysics of Velocity. Philosophical Studies 112 (1):93 - 102.
    Some authors have recently arguedthat an objects velocity is logicallyindependent of its locations throughout time.Their aim is to deny the Russellianview that motion is merely a change oflocation, and to promote a rival account onwhich the connection between velocities andtrajectories is provided by the laws ofnature. I defend the Russellian view of motionagainst these attacks.
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  18. Thomas Meyer, Uwe Vinkemeier & Ulrich Meyer (2002). Bioethical Implications of Pharmacogenomic Treatment Strategies. Ethik in der Medizin 14 (1):3-10.
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  19. Thomas Meyer, Uwe Vinkemeier & Ulrich Meyer (2002). Medizinethische Implikationen Zukünftiger Pharmakogenomischer Behandlungsstrategien. Ethik in der Medizin 14 (1):3-10.
    Definition of the problem: Recent progress in the pharmacological sciences provides a first glimpse of the development of an individual, genotype-based drug therapy in order to improve the efficiency of drug utilization. Genotyping of genetic polymorphisms in genes involved in drug response promises to optimize drug therapy fundamentally by identifying patients for whom a pharmaceutical agent may be effective and safe or contraindicated because of expected adverse drug reactions. Arguments: The new pharmacogenomic treatment strategies raise complex bioethical issues, because genetic (...)
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  20. Ulrich Meyer (2002). Is Science First-Order? Analysis 62 (276):305-308.
    It is a popular view amongst some philosophers, most notably those with Quinean views about ontological commitment, that scientific theories are first-orderizable; that we can regiment all such theories in an extensional first-order language. I argue that this view is false, and that any acceptable account of science needs to take some modal notion as primitive.
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  21. Ulrich Meyer (2002). Prior and the Platonist. Analysis 62 (3):211–216.
    The aim of this paper is to draw attention to a conflict between two popular views about time: Arthur Prior’s proposal for treating tense on the model of modal logic, and the ‘Platonic’ thesis that some objects (God, forms, universals, or numbers) exist eternally.1 I will argue that anyone who accepts the former ought to reject the latter.
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  22. Ulrich Meyer (2000). Do Pseudonormal Persons Have Inverted Qualia? Facta Philosophica 2:309-25.
     
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