Search results for 'Umesh Chandra Sharma' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. H. R. Chopra, Umesh Chandra Sharma, M. K. Srivastava & MohdSabir Hussain (eds.) (1998). Library Science and its Facets. Ess Ess Publications.score: 290.0
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  2. Umesh Chandra Gupta, Shivakant Mishra, Sandeep Bhatia, Rastogi Rajul & Amit Sharma (2011). Evaluating the Strategies on Ethical Grounds for Phase 0 Oncology Clinical Trials. Journal of Clinical Research and Bioethics 2 (2).score: 290.0
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  3. Krishna Chandra Sharma (2006). On the Philosophy of Yoga. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry 2 (4):18-21.score: 120.0
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  4. Arvind Sharma (2000). Comment by Arvind Sharma. Journal of Religious Ethics 28 (1):159-164.score: 120.0
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  5. Krishna Chandra Sharma (2005). A Brief Survey of Ideas of Georg Lukacs. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry 1 (3).score: 120.0
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  6. Ram Murti Sharma, Vempaṭi Kuṭumbaśāstrī, Pravesh Saxena & Priti Kaushik (eds.) (2012). Advaitamaṇiḥ: Professor Ram Murti Sharma Commemorative Volume = Advaitamaṇiḥ. Vidyanidhi Prakashan.score: 120.0
     
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  7. Krishna Chandra Sharma (2005). Departure of Marx From Traditional Philosophy. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry 1 (2).score: 120.0
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  8. Krishna Chandra Sharma (2005). Hegelian Legacy and Marxian Paradigm. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry 1 (1).score: 120.0
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  9. Jayanthi Venkatadurai, Umesh Dhyani & Mohit Sharma (2013). Ethics and Morality Beyond Normative Theories. Asian Journal of Business Ethics:1-5.score: 120.0
    What is ethics in the contemporary world? What is the need of defining ethics and, secondly, defining it in contemporary context? The meaning of ethics is so ambiguous to nonphilosophical academicians, corporate world, and others who look to the meaning in the branch of Philosophy called Ethics. At the end of endless debates, if the purpose of getting a definition is done, it is clarity in thinking in defining ethics which would happen. This may lead to clarity in the study (...)
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  10. Arvind Sharma (2006). A Guide to Hindu Spirituality. World Wisdom.score: 60.0
    "Renowned scholar of Hinduism, Arvind Sharma, presents a concise and highly accessible introduction to the essence of Hindu spirituality which includes 13 black ...
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  11. Sanjay Jain & Arun Sharma (1997). The Structure of Intrinsic Complexity of Learning. Journal of Symbolic Logic 62 (4):1187-1201.score: 60.0
    Limiting identification of r.e. indexes for r.e. languages (from a presentation of elements of the language) and limiting identification of programs for computable functions (from a graph of the function) have served as models for investigating the boundaries of learnability. Recently, a new approach to the study of "intrinsic" complexity of identification in the limit has been proposed. This approach, instead of dealing with the resource requirements of the learning algorithm, uses the notion of reducibility from recursion theory to compare (...)
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  12. Suresh Chandra (2004). Ramakanta Bal. In R. C. Pradhan (ed.), The Philosophy of Suresh Chandra. Icpr, New Delhi. 257.score: 60.0
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  13. Matthew Kapstein, S. Radhakrishnan, Iqbal Singh & Arvind Sharma (eds.) (2004). The Buddhism Omnibus. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    The three works brought together in this collection explore Buddhism as a rich source of literary legend, an austere ethical guide, and a contemporary philosophy very relevant in the modern world in view of the resurgence of interest in the Buddha and his philosophy. Matthew T. Kapstein in his Introduction provides a concise historical overview of Buddhism in India and the renewal of interest in the Buddha s teachings and also situates the works in their proper contexts. Gautama Buddha by (...)
     
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  14. Arvind Sharma (2002). Modern Hindu Thought: The Essential Texts. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    Presenting biographies of such influential thinkers as Dayanand, Ramakrishna, Vivekananda, Keshub Chandra Sen and Gandhi, this work includes enthralling extracts from key writings of modern Hindu thinking. It will be of special interest to students and scholars of religion, classical philosophy, and Indian literature, as well as to anyone interested in Hinduism.
     
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  15. Renuka M. Sharma (2007). The Ethics of Birth and Death: Gender Infanticide in India. [REVIEW] Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 4 (3):181-192.score: 30.0
    This paper discusses the persistent devaluation of the girl child in India and the link between the entrenched perception of female valuelessness and the actual practice of infanticide of girl babies or foetuses. It seeks to place female infanticide, or ‘gendercide,’ within the context of Western-derived conceptions of ethics, justice and rights. To date, current ethical theories and internationally purveyed moral frameworks, as well as legal and political declarations, have fallen short of an adequate moral appraisal of infanticide. This paper (...)
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  16. Arvind Sharma (1990). Karma and Reincarnation in Advaita Vedānta. Journal of Indian Philosophy 18 (3):219-236.score: 30.0
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  17. Ashish Chandra & Gary A. Holt (1999). Pharmaceutical Advertisements: How They Deceive Patients. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 18 (4):359 - 366.score: 30.0
    Pharmaceutical advertising is one of the most important kinds of advertising that can have a direct impact on the health of a consumer. Hence, this necessitates the fact that it is essential for advertisers of such products to take special care and additional responsibility when devising the promotional strategies of these products. In reality, it has been observed that pharmaceutical product advertisers often promoted their products to achieve their own goals at the potential risk of having an adverse effect on (...)
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  18. Arvind Sharma (1996). On the Distinction Between Karma and Rebirth in Hinduism. Asian Philosophy 6 (1):29 – 35.score: 30.0
    Abstract The doctrines of Kanna and rebirth dovetail so neatly that they are often treated as a single philosophical package. This paper demonstrates that when they are each treated separately in their own right and their possible relationships are re?examined, it leads to a much more nuanced understanding of not only these concepts but also the issues they were developed to address.
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  19. Suresh Chandra (1981). Wittgenstein and Strawson on the Ascription of Experiences. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 41 (3):280-298.score: 30.0
  20. Ramesh Kumar Sharma (2004). Manyness of Selves, Samkhya, and K. C. Bhattacharyya. Philosophy East and West 54 (4):425-457.score: 30.0
    : Classical Sāmkhya, as represented by Īśvarakrsna's Sāmkhya-kārikā, is well known for its attempt to prove not only the reality but the plurality of selves (purusa-bahutva). The Sāmkhya argument, since it proceeds from the reality of the manyness of the bodies as its basic premise, approximates, even if not in every detail, the 'argument from analogy' in its traditional form (which the essay tries to explicate). One distinguished modern interpreter, K. C. Bhattacharyya, however, not satisfied with this account, attempts to (...)
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  21. Dhirendra Sharma (1968). Buddhist Theory of Meaning (Apoha) and Negative Statements. Philosophy East and West 18 (1/2):3-10.score: 30.0
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  22. Susan Budd & Ursula Sharma (eds.) (1994). The Healing Bond: The Patient-Practitioner Relationship and Therapeutic Responsibility. Routledge.score: 30.0
    By considering the nature of the relationship between patient and healer, The Healing Bond explores the responsibilities of both, with a special emphasis on the therapeutic responsibility. The editors and contributors examine both orthodox and unorthodox forms of healing practice and apply a variety of professional and analytic perspectives to the medical profession as a whole. They look at specific areas of health such as midwifery, psychoanalysis, naturopathy, the relations between medicine and state, and the appeal of "quacks." Particular issues (...)
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  23. Ruth Katz & Arvind Sharma (1977). The Aesthetics of Abhinavagupta. British Journal of Aesthetics 17 (3):259-265.score: 30.0
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  24. Arvind Sharma (2008). Karma, Rebirth, and the Problem of Evil: An Interjection in the Debate Between Whitley Kaufman and Monima Chadha and Nick Trakakis. Philosophy East and West 58 (4):pp. 572-575.score: 30.0
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  25. Arvind Sharma (2005). Jvanmukti in Neo-Hinduism: The Case of Ramaa Mahari. Asian Philosophy 15 (3):207 – 220.score: 30.0
    Jvanmukti or 'living liberation' has been identified as a distinguishing feature of Indian thought; or, upon drawing a narrower circle, of Hindu thought; and upon drawing an even narrower cocentric circle of Vedānta - of Advaita Vedānta. In some recent studies the cogency of its formulation within Advaita Vedānta has been questioned - but without reference to the testimony of its major modern exemplar, Rama a Mahar i (1879-1950). This paper examines the significance of the life and statements of Rama (...)
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  26. R. K. Sharma (2001). Dreamless Sleep and Some Related Philosophical Issues. Philosophy East and West 51 (2):210-231.score: 30.0
    The phenomenon of dreamless sleep and its philosophical consequences, particularly deep sleep's relevance to such issues as Self, Consciousness, Personal Identity, Unity of Subject, and Disembodied Life, are explored through a discussion, in varying detail, of certain noted doctrines and views--for example of Advaita Vedānta, Hegel, and H. D. Lewis. Finally, with a cue from Leibniz and McTaggart, the suggestion is made that at no stage during sleep is the self without some perceptions, however indeterminate. Support for this hypothesis is (...)
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  27. Ramesh Kumar Sharma (2011). Embodiment, Subjectivity, and Disembodied Existence. Philosophy East and West 61 (1):1-37.score: 30.0
    I think, from the standpoint of present experience, one can fairly start by saying that all experience is lived embodied experience, though it is clear that such a statement, if wholly unqualified, would mean a commitment of extensive implications. 1 Some of these implications I will briefly try to spell out toward the end of this essay. I don’t say our body sets limits to how far our imagination can really go, for clearly, if our imagination were wholly controlled by (...)
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  28. B. N. Krishnamurti Sharma (1986). Philosophy of Śrī Madhvācārya. Motilal Banarsidass.score: 30.0
  29. Sylvia Berryman, Alexander P. D. Mourelatos & Ravi K. Sharma (1995). Two Annotated Bibliographies on the Presocratics: A Critique and User's Guide. Ancient Philosophy 15 (2):471-494.score: 30.0
  30. Ramesh Sharma (1985). Dharmakīrti on the Existence of Other Minds. Journal of Indian Philosophy 13 (1):55-71.score: 30.0
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  31. B. N. Krishnamurti Sharma (1981). History of the Dvaita School of Vedānta and its Literature: From the Earliest Beginnings to Our Own Time. Motilal Banarsidass.score: 30.0
    This study offers a panoramic view of the creative, expository, interpretive, dialectic, polemical, didactic and devotional phases of Dvaita philosophy, and its ...
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  32. Arvind Sharma (1999). Jivanmukti in Neo-Hinduism: The Case of Ramana Maharsi. Asian Philosophy 9 (2):93 – 105.score: 30.0
    Jivanmukti or 'living liberation' has been identified as a distinguishing feature of Indian thought; or, upon drawing a narrower circle, of Hindu thought; and upon drawing an even narrower cocentric circle of Ved nta—of Advaita Ved nta. In some recent studies the cogency of its formulation within Advaita Ved nta has been questioned—but without reference to the testimony of its major modem exemplar, Ramana Maharsi (1879-1950). This paper examines the significance of the life and statements of Ramana Maharsi for the (...)
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  33. B. N. Krishnamurti Sharma (1960). A History of the Dvaita School of Vedānta and its Literature. Bombay, Booksellers' Pub. Co..score: 30.0
    This study offers a panoramic view of the creative, expository, interpretive, dialectic, polemical, didactic and devotional phases of Dvaita philosophy, and its ...
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  34. Dheeraj Sharma, Shaheen Borna & James M. Stearns (2009). An Investigation of the Effects of Corporate Ethical Values on Employee Commitment and Performance: Examining the Moderating Role of Perceived Fairness. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 89 (2):251 - 260.score: 30.0
    Corporate ethical values (CEVs) can be viewed outside the realm of organizational training, standard operating procedures, reward and punishment systems, formal statements, and as more representative of the real nature of the organization (Organ, 1988). Past researchers have empirically demonstrated the direct influence of CEVs on job performance. This study argues that employees' perception of organizational fairness will create perceptual distortion of CEVs. The results of the study indicate that perceived fairness moderates the influence of CEVs on two seminal outcomes, (...)
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  35. Arvind Sharma (2006). A Primal Perspective on the Philosophy of Religion. Springer.score: 30.0
    The philosophy of religion has been a largely European intellectual enterprise in two ways. It arose in Europe as a discipline and its subject matter has been profoundly influenced by Christianity as practised in Europe. The process of its deprovincialization in this respect started when it began to take religions other than Christianity within its purview - such as Hinduism, Buddhism, and Islam. Although now the religions of both East and West have found a place in it, a religious (...)
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  36. Arvind Sharma (1996). The Issue of Memory as a Pramana and its Implication for the Confirmation of Reincarnation in Hinduism. [REVIEW] Journal of Indian Philosophy 24 (1):21-36.score: 30.0
  37. Arvind Sharma (1979). All Religions Are: Equal? One? True? Same?: A Critical Examination of Some Formulations of the Neo-Hindu Position. Philosophy East and West 29 (1):59-72.score: 30.0
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  38. Arvind Sharma (1995). A Reply to Anantanand Rambachan. Philosophy East and West 45 (1):105-113.score: 30.0
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  39. C. S. Sharma (1982). The Role of Mathematics in Physics. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 33 (3):275-286.score: 30.0
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  40. Arvind Sharma (2001). To the Things Themselves: Essays on the Discourse and Practice of the Phenomenology of Religion. W. De Gruyter.score: 30.0
    A historical and contemporary exploration of Phenomenology of Religion as a method in the study of religion.This book of twelve chapters may be conceptually ...
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  41. Arvind Sharma (1999). The Puruṣārthas: An Axiological Exploration of Hinduism. Journal of Religious Ethics 27 (2):223 - 256.score: 30.0
    Three doctrines have often been identified in the context of Hindu civilization as its distinctive markers: the doctrine of the varṇas (or the doctrine of the four classes), the doctrine of āśramas (or the doctrine of the four stages of life), and the doctrine of the puruṣārthas (or the doctrine of the four goals of life). The study of the last of these has been comparatively neglected and the doctrine has even been dubbed a myth (Krishna 1996, 189-205). The purpose (...)
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  42. Pritha Chandra (2008). Peter Carruthers, the Architecture of the Mind. Minds and Machines 18 (1):133-139.score: 30.0
  43. Francis X. Clooney, Gail Hinich Sutherland, Lou Ratté, Francis X. Clooney, Carl Olson, Constantina Rhodes Bailly, Alex Wayman, Herman Tull, Sheila McDonough, Robert Zydenbos, Cynthia Ann Humes, Sarah Caldwell, Deepak Sharma, Robin Rinehart, Robert N. Minor, Frank J. Korom, Janice D. Willis, Peter Flügel, Vijay Prashad, Muhammad Usman Erdosy, Muhammad Usman Erdosy, Antony Copley, Steve Derné, Swarna Rajagopalan, Gavin Flood, Rebecca J. Manring, Michael York, David Gordon White, John Grimes, Melissa Kerin, Steven J. Rosen, Anna B. Bigelow, Carl Olson & Will Sweetman (1997). Book Reviews and Notices. [REVIEW] International Journal of Hindu Studies 1 (3):596-643.score: 30.0
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  44. Arvind Sharma (1991). Karma and Rebirth in Alberuni's India. Asian Philosophy 1 (1):77 – 91.score: 30.0
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  45. George W. Shields, Patrick M. Foster, Renuka Sharma, Carl Vadivella Belle & Elizabeth Fuller Collins (2001). Book Reviews. [REVIEW] Sophia 40 (2):67-89.score: 30.0
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  46. Suresh Chandra (2003). Nature of the Subject That Owns States of Consciousness. Indian Philosophical Quarterly 30 (3):357-370.score: 30.0
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  47. Ramesh Kumar Sharma (2001). Dreamless Sleep and Some Related Philosophical Issues. Philosophy East and West 51 (2):210 - 231.score: 30.0
    The phenomenon of dreamless sleep and its philosophical consequences, particularly deep sleep's relevance to such issues as Self, Consciousness, Personal Identity, Unity of Subject, and Disembodied Life, are explored through a discussion, in varying detail, of certain noted doctrines and views--for example of Advaita Vedānta, Hegel, and H. D. Lewis. Finally, with a cue from Leibniz and McTaggart, the suggestion is made that at no stage during sleep is the self without some perceptions, however indeterminate. Support for this hypothesis is (...)
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  48. Arvind Sharma, Philip H. Wiebe, Gregory E. Ganssle & Patrick Hutchings (2006). Book Reviews. [REVIEW] Sophia 45 (1):121-127.score: 30.0
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  49. Arvind Sharma (1979). Fate and Free Will in the Bhagavadgītā. Religious Studies 15 (4):531 - 537.score: 30.0
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