Search results for 'Unavoidability' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Thomas P. Flint (1987). Compatibilism and the Argument From Unavoidability. Journal of Philosophy 84 (August):423-40.score: 15.0
  2. Philip A. Meyer (1970). Role of an Unavoidability Procedure in Eliminating Avoidance Behavior with Humans. Journal of Experimental Psychology 86 (2):337.score: 15.0
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  3. Kristja´N. Kristja´Nsson (2003). The Development of Justice Conceptions and the Unavoidability of the Normative. Journal of Moral Education 32 (2):183-194.score: 10.0
    This article spells out the way in which normative concerns unavoidably enter into the design and interpretation of empirical research on children's development of justice conceptions, with special emphasis on Damon's well-known stage theory of such development. Normative considerations provide assumptions not only about what counts as a conception of justice in the first place but also what counts as a better or a worse conception. Damon, for one, relies on the questionable normative premise that all distributive choices are choices (...)
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  4. Matthew H. Kramer (2001). On the Unavoidability of Actions: Quentin Skinner, Thomas Hobbes, and the Modern Doctrine of Negative Liberty. Inquiry 44 (3):315 – 330.score: 9.0
    During the past few decades, Quentin Skinner has been one of the most prominent critics of the ideas about negative liberty that have developed out of the writings of Isaiah Berlin. Among Skinner?s principal charges against the contemporary doctrine of negative liberty is the claim that the proponents of that doctrine have overlooked the putative fact that people can be made unfree to refrain from undertaking particular actions. In connection with this matter, Skinner contrasts the present-day theories with the prototypical (...)
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  5. Naomi Scheman (1990). The Unavoidability of Gender. Journal of Social Philosophy 21 (2-3):34-39.score: 9.0
  6. Gianfranco Pellegrino (2012). Introductory Note. Population Ethics: The Unavoidability of the Quality of Life and the Ensuing Paradoxes. Iride 25 (1):27-34.score: 9.0
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  7. Juha Oikkonen (1989). Review: Stig Kanger, Unavoidability. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 54 (2):631-631.score: 9.0
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  8. Juha Oikkonen (1989). Ranger Stig, Unavoidability, Logic and Abstraction, Essays Dedicated to Per Lindström on His Fiftieth Birthday, Edited by Furberg Mats, Wetterström Thomas, and Åberg Claes, Acta Philosophica Gothoburgensia, No. 1, Acta Universitatis Gothobargensis, Göteborg 1986, Pp. 227–236. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 54 (2):631-631.score: 9.0
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  9. Paul Smeyers (1995). On the Unavoidability of Power in Child-Rearing: Is the Language of Rights Educationally Appropriate? Studies in Philosophy and Education 14 (1):9-21.score: 9.0
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  10. Joan Rand Moschovakis (2010). Unavoidable Sequences in Constructive Analysis. Mathematical Logic Quarterly 56 (2):205-215.score: 5.0
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  11. Samuel Alexander (2013). Biologically Unavoidable Sequences. Electronic Journal of Combinatorics 20 (1):1-13.score: 4.0
    A biologically unavoidable sequence is an infinite gender sequence which occurs in every gendered, infinite genealogical network satisfying certain tame conditions. We show that every eventually periodic sequence is biologically unavoidable (this generalizes König's Lemma), and we exhibit some biologically avoidable sequences. Finally we give an application of unavoidable sequences to cellular automata.
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  12. Bryan G. Wiebe (2000). Unavoidable Blameworthiness. Journal of Philosophical Research 25:275-283.score: 4.0
    The Kantian ethical position, especially as represented in Alan Donagan, rejects the possibility of unavoidable blameworthiness. Donagan also holds that morality is learned by participation. But consider: there must be some first instance of an agent’s being held blameworthy. To hold the agent blameworthy in that instance supposes that the agent could have known what morality required so as to be able to avoid blameworthiness. But before experiencing blameworthiness the agent can have no real understanding of the significance of morality’s (...)
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  13. Debashis Guha (2008). Is Structuralism Unavoidable in the Application of Ethics? Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 3:31-38.score: 4.0
    Serious thinking about the models of application of ethics has enabled us to move away from ethical engineering and adopting a social-scientific vocation that is an aid to moral-engineering. Time is ripe to rethink about the charge of “structuralism” on the non-engineering model of applied ethics. If we fail to resolve this issue, a structuralist application of ethics will be unavoidable, leading way to the old engineering. The paper argues why “structuralism” is undesirable and how it is avoided in a (...)
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  14. David P. Hunt (2000). Moral Responsibility and Unavoidable Action. Philosophical Studies 97 (2):195-227.score: 3.0
    The principle of alternate possibilities (PAP), making the ability to do otherwise a necessary condition for moral responsibility, is supposed by Harry Frankfurt, John Fischer, and others to succumb to a peculiar kind of counterexample. The paper reviews the main problems with the counterexample that have surfaced over the years, and shows how most can be addressed within the terms of the current debate. But one problem seems ineliminable: because Frankfurt''s example relies on a counterfactual intervener to preclude alternatives to (...)
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  15. David Widerker (2009). A Defense of Frankfurt-Friendly Libertarianism. Philosophical Explorations 12 (2):87 – 108.score: 3.0
    Elsewhere, I proposed a libertarian-based account of freedom and moral blameworthiness which like Harry Frankfurt's 1969 account rejects the principle of alternative possibilities (which I call, Frankfurt-friendly libertarianism). In this paper I develop this account further (a) by responding to an important objection to it raised by Carlos Moya; (b) by exploring the question why, if unavoidability per se does not exonerate from blame, the Frankfurt-friendly libertarian is justified in exculpating an agent under determinism; (c) by arguing that some (...)
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  16. Tomis Kapitan (2002). A Master Argument for Incompatibilism? In Robert H. Kane (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Free Will. Oxford University Press. 127--157.score: 3.0
    The past 25 years have witnessed a vigorous discussion of an argument directed against the compatibilist approach to free will and responsibility. This reasoning, variously called the “consequence argument,” the “incompatibility argument,” and the “unavoidability argument,” may be expressed informally as follows: If determinism is true then whatever happens is a consequence of past events and laws over which we have no control and which we are unable to prevent. But whatever is a consequence of what’s beyond our control (...)
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  17. Lisa Tessman (2010). Idealizing Morality. Hypatia 25 (4):797 - 824.score: 3.0
    Implicit in feminist and other critiques of ideal theorizing is a particular view of what normative theory should be like. Although I agree with the rejection of ideal theorizing that oppression theorists (and other theorists of justice) have advocated, the proposed alternative of nonideal theorizing is also problematic. Nonideal theorizing permits one to address oppression by first describing (nonideal) oppressive conditions, and then prescribing the best action that is possible or feasible given the conditions. Borrowing an insight from the "moral (...)
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  18. Tomis Kapitan (1991). Ability and Cognition: A Defense of Compatibilism. Philosophical Studies 63 (August):231-43.score: 3.0
    The use of predicate and sentential operators to express the practical modalities -- ability, control, openness, etc. -- has given new life to a fatalistic argument against determinist theories of responsible agency. A familiar version employs the following principle: the consequences of what is unavoidable (beyond one's control) are themselves unavoidable. Accordingly, if determinism is true, whatever happens is the consequence of events in the remote past, or, of such events together with the laws of nature. But laws and the (...)
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  19. Paul A. Nelson (1999). Is "Intelligent Design" Unavoidable-Even by Howard Van Till? A Response. Zygon 34 (4):677-682.score: 3.0
  20. Elspeth Tilley (2005). The Ethics Pyramid: Making Ethics Unavoidable in the Public Relations Process. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 20 (4):305 – 320.score: 3.0
    To move from the realm of good intent to verifiable practice, ethics needs to be approached in the same way as any other desired outcome of the public relations process: that is, operationalized and evaluated at each stage of a public relations campaign. A pyramid model - the "ethics pyramid" - is useful for incorporating ethical reflection and evaluation processes into the standard structure of a typical public relations plan. Practitioners can use it to integrate and manage ethical intent, means, (...)
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  21. Rik Peels (2013). Does Doxastic Responsibility Entail the Ability to Believe Otherwise? Synthese 190 (17):3651-3669.score: 3.0
    Whether responsibility for actions and omissions requires the ability to do otherwise is an important issue in contemporary philosophy. However, a closely related but distinct issue, namely whether doxastic responsibility requires the ability to believe otherwise, has been largely neglected. This paper fills this remarkable lacuna by providing a defence of the thesis that doxastic responsibility entails the ability to believe otherwise. On the one hand, it is argued that the fact that unavoidability is normally an excuse counts in (...)
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  22. Tomis Kapitan (1996). Modal Principles in the Metaphysics of Free Will. Philosophical Perspectives 10:419-45.score: 3.0
    Discussions of free will have frequently centered on principles concerning ability, control, unavoidability and other practical modalities. Some assert the closure of the latter over various propositional operations and relations, for example, that the consequences of what is beyond one's control are themselves beyond one's control.1 This principle has been featured in the unavoidability argument for incompatibilism: if everything we do is determined by factors which are not under our control, then, by the principle, we are unable to (...)
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  23. Bert Lambeir & Paul Smeyers (2003). Nihilism: Beyond Optimism and Pessimism. Studies in Philosophy and Education 22 (3/4):183-194.score: 3.0
    Is the youth culture, or more precisely aparticular kind of it, to be characterized as nihilistic ? And is this a threat or ablessing for education? To deal with this nihilism is first characterized generally andfollowing particular attention is paid toNietzsche's own version and revaluation ofvalues. Then Foucault's concept of life as awork of art is brought to the forefront as aparticular manner to give shape to one's life.It is argued that some of the more popularforms of pleasure nowadays may (...)
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  24. Shaun Young (2007). Avoiding the Unavoidable? Judith Shklar's Unwilling Search for an Overlapping Consensus. Res Publica 13 (3):231-253.score: 3.0
    No less an authority than John Rawls identified Judith Shklar as a ‘political’ liberal. However, though their respective conceptions of political liberalism are similar in a number of important respects, Shklar emphasizes that her vision differs notably from that of Rawls. In particular, she explicitly eschews Rawls’s focus on establishing and sustaining an overlapping consensus, arguing that his belief in the possibility of securing such a consensus is naïve and, indeed, dangerous insofar as it embodies an obvious disregard for the (...)
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  25. Michael J. Coughlan (1990). Essential Aims and Unavoidable Responsibilities: A Response to Anscombe. Bioethics 4 (1):63–65.score: 3.0
  26. Howard Brody & Franklin G. Miller (2003). The Clinician-Investigator: Unavoidable but Manageable Tension. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 13 (4):329-346.score: 3.0
    : The "difference position" holds that clinical research and therapeutic medical practice are sufficiently distinct activities to require different ethical rules and principles. The "similarity position" holds instead that clinical investigators ought to be bound by the same fundamental principles that govern therapeutic medicine—specifically, a duty to provide the optimal therapeutic benefit to each patient or subject. Some defenders of the similarity position defend it because of the overlap between the role of attending physician and the role of investigator in (...)
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  27. Ernst von Glasersfeld (2010). Why People Dislike Radical Constructivism. Constructivist Foundations 6 (1):19-21.score: 3.0
    Problem: Radical constructivism, although having a very successful base in research on mathematics and science education, has not become a generally accepted theory of knowledge. Purpose: This paper discusses possible sources of aversion. Results: The first section makes explicit the unavoidability of accepting the responsibility for one’s thinking and acting, a responsibility that under stressful circumstances one would rather avoid. Another section suggests the origin of the human quest for certain knowledge. The third section introduces the notion of “stickiness (...)
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  28. Matthias Koßler (1999). Der Transzendentale Schein in den Paralogismen der Reinen Vernunft Nach der Ersten Auflage der Kritik der Reinen Vernunft. Kant-Studien 90 (1):1-22.score: 3.0
    At the end of the chapter on paralogisms in the first edition of his _Critique of Pure Reason, Kant treats the problem of the transcendental illusion in a very detailed way which is not exceeded in the second edition. The essay gives an exhaustive commentary to this passage leading to the result that the unavoidability of transcendental illusion has to be taken seriously in that sense that human reason in his theoretical use cannot conceived other than liable to illusion.
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  29. Lennart Nordenfelt (2007). Rationality and Compulsion: Applying Action Theory to Psychiatry. OUP Oxford.score: 3.0
    Rationality and Compulsion presents a unique examination of mental illness - derived from philosophical action theory. Delusion is common to many mental disorders, resulting in actions that, though perhaps rational to the individual, might seem entirely inappropriate or harmful to others. So what is it that causes these actions, and why do they continue? The theory expounded in this book shows how the key to this problem might be compulsion. -/- This book presents a new analysis of the notion of (...)
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  30. Carlos Thiebaut (2006). A Metaphilosophical Dialogue. Topoi 25 (1-2):109-115.score: 3.0
    Three philosophical attitudes in dialogue are suggested in answering the question posed by the Journal. An inviting, First Inner Voice undeerstands philosophy as a shareable theoretical task that can be explained and understood even across distant philosophical paradigms. A Second Inner Voice, sometimes termed in the dialogue as sceptic, distrusts any metaphilosophical definition of what philosophy is and what it should do, but would, nevertheless, aspire to retain a certain universalistic understanding of its own work, though it cannot be strongly (...)
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  31. J. K. Alexander (2006). Economic Instability and the Unfortunate, and Unavoidable, Consequences of Acting Ethically. Journal of Business Ethics 66 (2-3):147 - 155.score: 3.0
    In this paper I describe and analyze an economic situation involving two competitive organizations. I put forth the argument that because of the systemic nature of decision making relative to managing the requirements of utilizing a descriptive equation that determines how many people an economic system can support, that even if all the players in the situation act ethically, the results will still be harmful, and necessarily so, to the system and to many innocent people. I will demonstrate that harming (...)
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  32. Katrina Hui (2014). Moral Anthropocentrism Is Unavoidable. American Journal of Bioethics 14 (2):25-25.score: 3.0
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  33. Neil Mcdonell (1983). Are Pictures Unavoidably Specific? Synthese 57 (1):83 - 98.score: 3.0
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  34. Seth Shabo (2013). It Wasn't Up to Jones: Unavoidable Actions and Intensional Contexts in Frankfurt Examples. Philosophical Studies:1-21.score: 3.0
    In saying that it was up to someone whether or not she acted as she did, we are attributing a distinctive sort of power to her. Understanding such power attributions is of broad importance for contemporary discussions of free will. Yet the ‘is up to…whether’ locution and its cognates have largely escaped close examination. This article aims to elucidate one of its unnoticed features, namely that such power attributions introduce intensional contexts, something that is easily overlooked because the sentences that (...)
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  35. Stephen Coleman (2005). Conflict of Interest and Police: An Unavoidable Problem. Criminal Justice Ethics 24 (2):3-11.score: 3.0
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  36. Thyge Tegtmejer (2013). Rousseau I 2012: De-Konstrueret Og Re-Konstrueret. Studier I Pædagogisk Filosofi 2 (1):70-84.score: 3.0
    What will become of Rousseau when read in a non-transcendent way, as a line of some of the most prominent contemporary theorists of the philosophy of education would suggest as inevitable? To answer this question, the position and analytical tools of Jacques Derrida are clarified, and Rousseau’s “Émile ou De l’éducation” is read non-transcendentally, which implies a challenge and a deconstruction of the way Rousseau has built the argument for his educational project. The article concludes with a critical discussion of (...)
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  37. J. H. Woodger (1931). Some Apparently Unavoidable Characteristics of Natural Scientific Theory. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 32:95 - 120.score: 3.0
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  38. Ken Levy (2005). Why It Is Sometimes Fair to Blame Agents for Unavoidable Actions and Omissions. American Philosophical Quarterly 42 (2):93 - 104.score: 3.0
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  39. Karen Wendling (1997). Unavoidable Inequalities. Social Theory and Practice 23 (2):161-179.score: 3.0
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  40. Elizabeth F. Cohen (2010). It Might Thus Seem That We Are Back to Square One Where QoD is Unavoidably a Complex Multidimensional Concept That, Because of its Nature, is Intractable in Comparative Research. After Reading The Quality of Democracy in Eastern Europe, However, We Are Not. The Author Deserves Applause. Inquiry 80:241-60.score: 3.0
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  41. Paul Robinson (2005). Justification Defenses in Situations of Unavoidable Uncertainty: A Reply to Professor Ferzan. [REVIEW] Law and Philosophy 24 (6):775-784.score: 3.0
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  42. Brian E. Butler (2001). Is All Judicial Decision-Making Unavoidably Interpretive? Legal Studies Forum (3&4):315-329.score: 3.0
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  43. Frederick Doepke (2002). Philosophy: Confronting the Unavoidable. Wadsworth.score: 3.0
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  44. Bridget Fowler (2013). Simon Susen's “Bourdieusian Reflections on Language: Unavoidable Conditions of the Real Speech Situation”—A Rejoinder. Social Epistemology 27 (3-4):250-260.score: 3.0
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  45. M. Haverland (1995). Classical Anglican Moral Theology: Unavoidably Non-Ecumenical. Christian Bioethics 1 (2):200-212.score: 3.0
    In its specific moral conclusions ecclesiastical Anglican theology shares much with traditional Protestantism, Roman Catholicism, and Eastern Orthodoxy. In its understanding of the method and purpose of moral theology classical Anglicanism sometimes diverges from earlier Roman Catholicism — and anticipates the most positive developments in contemporary Roman Catholic moral theology — while sharing a common theological heritage with Rome in its understanding of natural law , the moral agent, and the moral act. Anglicans situate moral reasoning within the Church of (...)
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  46. Jennifer Judkins (1999). Ossi Naukkarinen, Aesthetics of the Unavoidable: Aesthetic Variations in Human Appearance Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 19 (5):361-362.score: 3.0
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  47. Wendling Karen (1997). Unavoidable Inequalities: Some Implications for Participatory Democratic Theory. Social Theory and Practice 23 (2).score: 3.0
     
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  48. Hans-Herbert Kögler (2013). Unavoidable Idealizations and the Reality of Symbolic Power. Social Epistemology 27 (3-4):302-314.score: 3.0
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  49. J. Lauwereyns (2006). Voluntary Control of Unavoidable Action. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 10 (2):47-49.score: 3.0
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  50. Xb Liu (1994). 'Unavoidable Reflection, Contemplating Stories on Intellectuals+ Translated From the Chinese with Notes by Lu, Brian. Chinese Studies in Philosophy 25 (4):76-93.score: 3.0
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