Search results for 'Unconsciousness' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. John R. Searle (1991). Consciousness, Unconsciousness and Intentionality. Philosophical Issues 1 (1):45-66.score: 21.0
  2. George A. Mashour & Eric LaRock (2008). Inverse Zombies, Anesthesia Awareness, and the Hard Problem of Unconsciousness. Consciousness and Cognition 17 (4):1163-1168.score: 18.0
    Philosophical (p-) zombies are constructs that possess all of the behavioral features and responses of a sentient human being, yet are not conscious. P-zombies are intimately linked to the hard problem of consciousness and have been invoked as arguments against physicalist approaches. But what if we were to invert the characteristics of p-zombies? Such an inverse (i-) zombie would possess all of the behavioral features and responses of an insensate being yet would nonetheless be conscious. While p-zombies are logically possible (...)
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  3. M. T. Alkire, R. J. Haier & J. H. Fallon (2000). Toward a Unified Theory of Narcosis: Brain Imaging Evidence for a Thalamocortical Switch as the Neurophysiologic Basis of Anesthetic-Induced Unconsciousness. Consciousness and Cognition 9 (3):370-386.score: 18.0
    A unifying theory of general anesthetic-induced unconsciousness must explain the common mechanism through which various anesthetic agents produce unconsciousness. Functional-brain-imaging data obtained from 11 volunteers during general anesthesia showed specific suppression of regional thalamic and midbrain reticular formation activity across two different commonly used volatile agents. These findings are discussed in relation to findings from sleep neurophysiology and the implications of this work for consciousness research. It is hypothesized that the essential common neurophysiologic mechanism underlying anesthetic-induced unconsciousness (...)
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  4. Olivier Houdé (2002). Consciousness and Unconsciousness of Logical Reasoning Errors in the Human Brain. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (3):341-341.score: 18.0
    I challenge here the concept of SOC in regard to the question of the consciousness or unconsciousness of logical errors. My commentary offers support for the demonstration of how neuroimaging techniques might be used in the psychology of reasoning to test hypotheses about a potential hierarchy of levels of consciousness (and thus of partial unconsciousness) implemented in different brain networks.
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  5. Hans Flohr (2006). Unconsciousness. Best Practice and Research Clinical Anaesthesiology 20 (1):11-22.score: 15.0
  6. George Henry Lewes (1877). Consciousness and Unconsciousness. Mind 2 (6):156-167.score: 15.0
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  7. Carson Strong (2006). Gamete Retrieval After Death or Irreversible Unconsciousness: What Counts as Informed Consent? Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 15 (02):161-171.score: 15.0
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  8. Paula Droege (2010). The Role of Unconsciousness in Free Will. Journal of Consciousness Studies 17 (5-6):5-6.score: 15.0
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  9. Andrew Smith (1978). Unconsciousness and Quasiconsciousness in Plotinus. Phronesis 23 (3):292 - 301.score: 15.0
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  10. Susan Pockett & Mark D. Holmes (2009). Intracranial EEG Power Spectra and Phase Synchrony During Consciousness and Unconsciousness. Consciousness and Cognition 18 (4):1049-1055.score: 15.0
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  11. [deleted]Steven Laureys Athena Demertzi, Audrey Vanhaudenhuyse, Serge Brédart, Lizette Heine, Carol di Perri (2013). Looking for the Self in Pathological Unconsciousness. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 15.0
    There is an intimate relationship between consciousness and the notion of self. By studying patients with disorders of consciousness, we are offered with a unique lesion approach to tackle the neural correlates of self in the absence of subjective reports. Studies employing neuroimaging techniques point to the critical involvement of midline anterior and posterior cortices in response to the passive presentation of self-referential stimuli, such as the patient’s own name and own face. Also, resting state studies show that these midline (...)
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  12. Robert S. Corrington (1992). Peirce's Abjected Unconsciousness. Semiotics:91-103.score: 15.0
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  13. Catalin Vasile Bobb (2010). C. G. Jung, Opere complete. Arhetipurile si inconstientul colectiv/ Complete Works. Archetypes And Collective Unconsciousness. [REVIEW] Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 3 (7):204-205.score: 15.0
    C. G. Jung, Opere complete. Arhetipurile si inconstientul colectiv Ed. Trei, Bucuresti, 2003.
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  14. George Henry Lewes (1877). Consciousness and Unconsciousness. Mind 2 (6):156-167.score: 15.0
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  15. Julian Triado (1981). Book Reviews : 3 Class Unconsciousness. Thesis Eleven 3 (1):177-180.score: 15.0
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  16. [deleted]Soddu Andrea (2012). Propofol Induced Unconsciousness: fMRI Total Neuronal Activity and Resting State Networks. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 15.0
  17. Ira H. Cohen (1982). Ideology and Unconsciousness: Reich, Freud, and Marx. New York University Press.score: 15.0
  18. C. A. Richardson (1925). Time and Its Relation to Unconsciousness. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 26:87 - 96.score: 15.0
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  19. Debra C. Rosenthal (1986). Ideology and Unconsciousness. International Studies in Philosophy 18 (1):69-71.score: 15.0
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  20. P. Bercherie (1989). Unconsciousness and Knowledge of Madness, Freud in the Field of Psychiatry. Revue Internationale de Philosophie 43 (171):525-539.score: 15.0
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  21. R. Jacoby (1982). Ideology and Unconsciousness: Reich, Freud and Marx. Telos 1982 (54):191-194.score: 15.0
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  22. Russell Jacoby (1978). Political Economy and Class Unconsciousness. Theory and Society 5 (1):11-18.score: 15.0
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  23. James Grier[from old catalog] Miller (1942). Unconsciousness. London, Chapman & Hall, Limited.score: 15.0
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  24. Liangkang Ni (2005). Primary Consciousness and Unconsciousness in Husserl's Time Comprehension. Husserl Studies 21 (1).score: 15.0
     
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  25. J. Bouveresse (1995). Wittgenstein Reads Freud: The Myth of the Unconscious. Princeton University Press.score: 12.0
    Did Freud present a scientific hypothesis about the unconscious, as he always maintained and as many of his disciples keep repeating? This question has long prompted debates concerning the legitimacy and usefulness of psychoanalysis, and it is of utmost importance to Lacanian analysts, whose main project has been to stress Freud's scientific grounding. Here Jacques Bouveresse, a noted authority on Ludwig Wittgenstein, contributes to the debate by turning to this Austrian-born philosopher and contemporary of Freud for a candid assessment of (...)
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  26. Mark Bevir (2004). The Unconscious in Social Explanation. Philosophical Psychology 17 (2):181-207.score: 12.0
    The proper range and content of the unconscious in the human sciences should be established by reference to its conceptual relationship to the folk psychology that informs the standard form of explanation therein. A study of this relationship shows that human scientists should appeal to the unconscious only when the language of the conscious fails them, i.e. typically when they find a conflict between people's self-understanding and their actions. This study also shows that human scientists should adopt a broader concept (...)
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  27. Graham F. Macdonald (1999). Folk-Psychology, Psychopathology, and the Unconscious. Philosophical Explorations 2 (3):206-224.score: 12.0
    There is a 'philosophers' assumption that there is a problem with the very notion of an unconscious mental state.The paper begins by outlining how the problem is generated, and proceeds to argue that certain conditions need to be fulfilled if the unconscious is to qualify as mental. An explanation is required as to why we would ever expect these conditions to be fulfilled, and it is suggested that the Freudian concept of repression has an essential role to play in such (...)
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  28. Logi Gunnarsson (2005). Trapped in a Secret Cellar: Breaking the Spell of a Picture of Unconscious States. Philosophical Investigations 28 (3):273-288.score: 11.0
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  29. Arkady Plotnitsky (2004). The Unthinkable: Nonclassical Theory, the Unconscious Mind and the Quantum Brain. In Gordon G. Globus, Karl H. Pribram & Giuseppe Vitiello (eds.), Brain and Being. John Benjamins. 58--29.score: 11.0
  30. Ned Block (2011). The Anna Karenina Theory of the Unconscious. Neuropsychoanalysis 13 (1):34-37.score: 10.0
    The Anna Karenina Theory says: all conscious states are alike; each unconscious state is unconscious in its own way. This note argues that many components have to function properly to produce consciousness, but failure in any one of many different ones can yield an unconscious state in different ways. In that sense the Anna Karenina theory is true. But in another respect it is false: kinds of unconsciousness depend on kinds of consciousness.
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  31. M. Overgaard (forthcoming). Automaticity, Unconsciousness and Speech Production. Science and Consciousness Review.score: 10.0
     
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  32. Arthur S. Reber (1993). Implicit Learning and Tacit Knowledge: An Essay on the Cognitive Unconscious. Oxford University Press.score: 8.0
    In this new volume in the Oxford Psychology Series, the author presents a highly readable account of the cognitive unconscious, focusing in particular on the problem of implicit learning. Implicit learning is defined as the acquisition of knowledge that takes place independently of the conscious attempts to learn and largely in the absence of explicit knowledge about what was acquired. One of the core assumptions of this argument is that implicit learning is a fundamental, "root" process, one that lies at (...)
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  33. Rudolf Bernet (2002). Unconscious Consciousness in Husserl and Freud. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 1 (3):327-351.score: 8.0
    A clarification of Husserl's changing conceptions of imaginary consciousness ( phantasy ) and memory, especially at the level of auto-affective time-consciousness, suggests an interpretation of Freud's concept of the Unconscious. Phenomenology of consciousness can show how it is possible that consciousness can bring to present appearance something unconscious, that is, something foreign or absent to consciousness, without incorporating it into or subordinating it to the conscious present. This phenomenological analysis of Freud's concept of the Unconscious leads to a partial critique (...)
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  34. Alexandre Billon (2011). Have We Vindicated the Motivational Unconscious Yet? A Conceptual Review. Frontiers in Psychoanalysis and Neuropsychoanalysis 2.score: 8.0
    Motivationally unconscious (M-unconscious) states are unconscious states that can directly motivate a subject’s behavior and whose unconscious character typically results from a form of repression. The basic argument for M-unconscious states claims that they provide the best explanation to some seemingly non rational behaviors, like akrasia, impulsivity or apparent self-deception. This basic argument has been challenged on theoretical, empirical and conceptual grounds. Drawing on recent works on apparent self-deception and on the ‘cognitive unconscious’ I assess those objections. I argue that (...)
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  35. Uriah Kriegel (2011). Cognitive Phenomenology as the Basis of Unconscious Content. In T. Bayne & M. Montague (eds.), Cognitive Phenomenology. Oxford University Press. 79--102.score: 8.0
    Since the seventies, it has been customary to assume that intentionality is independent of consciousness. Recently, a number of philosophers have rejected this assumption, claiming intentionality is closely tied to consciousness, inasmuch as non- conscious intentionality in some sense depends upon conscious intentionality. Within this alternative framework, the question arises of how to account for unconscious intentionality, and different authors have offered different accounts. In this paper, I compare and contrast four possible accounts of unconscious intentionality, which I call potentialism, (...)
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  36. Lois Isenman (2013). Understanding Unconscious Intelligence and Intuition: &Quot;blink" and Beyond. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 56 (1):148-166.score: 8.0
    The importance of unconscious cognition is seeping into popular consciousness. A number of recent books bridging the academic world and the reading public stress that at least a portion of decision-making depends not on conscious reasoning, but instead on cognition that occurs below awareness. However, these books provide a limited perspective on how the unconscious mind works and the potential power of intuition. This essay is an effort to expand the picture. It is structured around the book that has garnered (...)
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  37. Frank Cioffi (2009). Making the Unconscious Conscious: Wittgenstein Versus Freud. Philosophia 37 (4):565-588.score: 8.0
    The common assimilation of Wittgenstein’s philosophical procedure to Freud’s psychoanalytic method is a mistake. The concurrence of Freudian analysands is neither a necessary nor a sufficient condition of their unconscious thoughts having been detected. There are several sources of this error. One is the equivocal role Freud assign the patient’s recognition of the correctness of his interpretation and in particular the part played by ‘paradoxical reminiscence’: another, the surreptitious banalisation of Freud’s procedure by followers—the reinvention of psychoanalysis as a phenomenological (...)
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  38. Berit Brogaard (2011). Conscious Vision for Action Versus Unconscious Vision for Action? Cognitive Science 35 (6):1076-1104.score: 8.0
    David Milner and Melvyn Goodale’s dissociation hypothesis is commonly taken to state that there are two functionally specialized cortical streams of visual processing originating in striate (V1) cortex: a dorsal, action-related “unconscious” stream and a ventral, perception-related “conscious” stream. As Milner and Goodale acknowledge, findings from blindsight studies suggest a more sophisticated picture that replaces the distinction between unconscious vision for action and conscious vision for perception with a tripartite division between unconscious vision for action, conscious vision for perception, and (...)
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  39. Timothy D. Wilson (2002). Strangers to Ourselves: Discovering the Adaptive Unconscious. Harvard University Press.score: 8.0
    This is not your psychoanalyst's unconscious.
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  40. Susan M. Andersen, Inga Reznik & Noah S. Glassman (2005). The Unconscious Relational Self. In Ran R. Hassin, James S. Uleman & John A. Bargh (eds.), The New Unconscious. Oxford Series in Social Cognition and Social Neuroscience. Oxford University Press. 421-481.score: 8.0
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  41. Michele Di Francesco & Massimo Marraffa (2013). The Unconscious, Consciousness, and the Self Illusion. Dialogues in Philosophy, Mental and Neuro Sciences 6 (1):10-22.score: 8.0
    In this article we explore the relationship between consciousness and the unconscious as it has taken shape within contemporary cognitive science - meaning by this term the mature cognitive science, which has fully incorporated the results of the neurosciences. In this framework we first compare the neurocognitive unconscious with the Freudian one, emphasizing the similarities and above all the differences between the two constructs. We then turn our attention to the implications of the centrality of unconscious processes in cognitive science (...)
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  42. M. Guy Thompson (2001). Is the Unconscious Really All That Unconscious? The Role of Being and Experience in the Psychoanalytic Encounter. Contemporary Psychoanalysis 37 (4):571-612.score: 8.0
    This paper explores the psychoanalytic conception of the unconscious and critiques it from a phenomenlogical perspective, especially Sartre and Heidegger, with a view to conceptualizing the unconscious from an ontological rather than psychological mindset.
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  43. Luis M. Augusto (2010). Unconscious Knowledge: A Survey. Advances in Cognitive Psychology 6:116-141.score: 8.0
    The concept of unconscious knowledge is fundamental for an understanding of human thought processes and mentation in general; however, the psychological community at large is not familiar with it. This paper offers a survey of the main psychological research currently being carried out into cognitive processes, and examines pathways that can be integrated into a discipline of unconscious knowledge. It shows that the field has already a defined history and discusses some of the features that all kinds of unconscious knowledge (...)
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  44. M. Guy Thompson (2004). Is the Unconscious Really All That Unconscious? In Paul Gordon & Rosalind Mayo (eds.), Between Psychotherapy and Philosophy: Essays From the Philadelphia Association. 141-178.score: 8.0
    This paper explores the psychoanalytic conception of the unconscious and critiques it from a phenomenlogical perspective, especially Sartre and Heidegger, with a view to conceptualizing the unconscious from an ontological rather than psychological mindset.
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  45. Charles E. M. Dunlop (2000). Searle's Unconscious Mind. Philosophical Psychology 13 (1):123-148.score: 8.0
    In his book The rediscovery of the mind John Searle claims that unconscious mental states (1) have first-person "aspectual shape", but (2) that their ontology is purely third-person. He attempts to eliminate the obvious inconsistency by arguing that the aspectual shape of unconscious mental states consists in their ability to cause conscious first-person states. However, I show that this attempted solution fails insofar as it covertly acknowledges that unconscious states lack the aspectual shape required for them to play a role (...)
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  46. Peter Todd (2008). Unconscious Mental Factors in Hiv Infection. Mind and Matter 6 (2):193-206.score: 8.0
    Multiple drug resistant strains of HIV and continuing difficulties with vaccine development highlight the importance of psychologi- cal interventions which aim to in uence the psychosocial and emo- tional factors empirically demonstrated to be significant predictors of immunity, illness progression and AIDS mortality in seropositive persons. Such data have profound implications for psychological interventions designed to modify psychosocial factors predictive of enhanced risk of exposure to HIV as well as the neuroendocrine and immune mechanisms mediating the impact of such factors (...)
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  47. Gerard O'Brien & Jon Jureidini (2002). Dispensing with the Dynamic Unconscious. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 9 (2):141-153.score: 8.0
    In recent years, a number of contemporary proponents of psychoanalysis have sought to derive support for their conjectures about the _dynamic_ unconscious from the empirical evidence in favor of the _cognitive_ unconscious. It is our contention, however, that far from supporting the dynamic unconscious, recent work in cognitive science suggests that the time has come to dispense with this concept altogether. In this paper we defend this claim in two ways. First, we argue that any attempt to shore up the (...)
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  48. Elisa Galgut (2005). Wishful Thinking and the Unconscious: A Reply to Gouws. South African Journal of Philosophy 24 (1):14-21.score: 8.0
    This paper argues against the view that the Freudian unconscious can be understood as an extension of ordinary belief-desire psychology. The paper argues that Freud’s picture of the mind challenges the paradigm of folk psychology, as it is understood by much contemporary philosophy of psychology and cognitive science. The dynamic unconscious postulated by psychoanalysis operates according to rules and principles which are distinct in kind from those rules that organise rational and conscious thought. Psychoanalysis offers us a radical reconception of (...)
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