Search results for 'Urban Forsum' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  3
    Per-Erik Liss, Olle Aspevall, Daniel Karlsson & Urban Forsum (2004). Interpreting Definitions: The Problem of Interpreting Definitions of Medical Concepts. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 7 (2):137-141.
    During the last hundred years medical language has been influenced by scientific and technological progress. As a result uncertainty in medical communication is increasing. This may have serious consequences not only for health care delivery but also for medical science. Disease classification, assessment of the validity of epidemiological investigations and comparison of the results of various investigations are examples of what will become less secure. The purpose of the article is to emphasise a main source of uncertainty — the problem (...)
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  2.  7
    Wilbur M. Urban (1917). The Knowledge of Other Minds and the Problem of Meaning and Value. Philosophical Review 26 (3):274-296.
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  3.  19
    Kathrin Specht, Rosemarie Siebert, Ina Hartmann, Ulf B. Freisinger, Magdalena Sawicka, Armin Werner, Susanne Thomaier, Dietrich Henckel, Heike Walk & Axel Dierich (2014). Urban Agriculture of the Future: An Overview of Sustainability Aspects of Food Production in and on Buildings. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 31 (1):33-51.
    Innovative forms of green urban architecture aim to combine food, production, and design to produce food on a larger scale in and on buildings in urban areas. It includes rooftop gardens, rooftop greenhouses, indoor farms, and other building-related forms. This study uses the framework of sustainability to understand the role of ZFarming in future urban food production and to review the major benefits and limitations. The results are based on an analysis of 96 documents published in accessible (...)
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  4.  26
    Miguel A. Altieri, Nelso Companioni, Kristina Cañizares, Catherine Murphy, Peter Rosset, Martin Bourque & Clara I. Nicholls (1999). The Greening of the “Barrios”: Urban Agriculture for Food Security in Cuba. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 16 (2):131-140.
    Urban agriculture in Cuba has rapidly become a significant source of fresh produce for the urban and suburban populations. A large number of urban gardens in Havana and other major cities have emerged as a grassroots movement in response to the crisis brought about by the loss of trade, with the collapse of the socialist bloc in 1989. These gardens are helping to stabilize the supply of fresh produce to Cuba's urban centers. During 1996, Havana's (...) farms provided the city's urban population with 8,500 tons of agricultural produce, 4 million dozens of flowers, 7.5 million eggs, and 3,650 tons of meat. This system of urban agriculture, composed of about 8,000 gardens nationwide has been developed and managed along agroecological principles, which eliminate the use of synthetic chemical pesticides and fertilizers, emphasizing diversification, recycling, and the use of local resources. This article explores the systems utilized by Cuba's urban farmers, and the impact that this movement has had on Cuban food security. (shrink)
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  5.  19
    Erik Bryld (2003). Potentials, Problems, and Policy Implications for Urban Agriculture in Developing Countries. Agriculture and Human Values 20 (1):79-86.
    Urban agriculture has, forcenturies, served as a vital input in thelivelihood strategies of urban households inthe developing countries. As a response to theeconomic crises exacerbated by the structuraladjustment programs and increasing migration,urban agriculture has expanded rapidly withinthe last 20 years. An examination of thegeneral trends in urban agriculture reveals anumber of issues policy-makers in developingcountries should address to provide services toensure a sustainable behavior towards urbancultivation. Most important is the legalizationof urban agriculture as a step (...)
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  6.  26
    Kameshwari Pothukuchi & Jerome L. Kaufman (1999). Placing the Food System on the Urban Agenda: The Role of Municipal Institutions in Food Systems Planning. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 16 (2):213-224.
    Food issues are generally regarded as agricultural and rural issues. The urban food system is less visible than such other systems as transportation, housing, employment, or even the environment. The reasons for its low visibility include the historic process by which issues and policies came to be defined as urban; the spread of processing, refrigeration, and transportation technology together with cheap, abundant energy that rendered invisible the loss of farmland around older cities; and the continuing institutional separation of (...)
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  7.  11
    Courtney M. Gallaher, John M. Kerr, Mary Njenga, Nancy K. Karanja & Antoinette M. G. A. WinklerPrins (2013). Urban Agriculture, Social Capital, and Food Security in the Kibera Slums of Nairobi, Kenya. Agriculture and Human Values 30 (3):389-404.
    Much of the developing world, including Kenya, is rapidly urbanizing. Rising food and fuel prices in recent years have put the food security of the urban poor in a precarious position. In cities worldwide, urban agriculture helps some poor people gain access to food, but urban agriculture is less common in densely populated slums that lack space. In the Kibera slums of Nairobi, Kenya, households have recently begun a new form of urban agriculture called sack gardening (...)
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  8.  13
    Elisabete Xavier Gomes (2012). The (Un) Bearable Educational Lightness of Common Practices: On the Use of Urban Spaces by Schoolchildren. Studies in Philosophy and Education 31 (3):289-302.
    The present paper is about the author’s current research on children’s education in urban contexts. It departs from the rising offer of programmes for school children in out-of-school contexts (e.g. museums, libraries, science centres). It asks what makes these practices educational (and not just interesting, entertaining and/or audience building). Based on Biesta (2006a, 2010) theory of education, the author frames and analyses the educational characteristics of, and possibilities of articulating, in and out-of-school educational practices. This paper aims at understanding (...)
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  9.  23
    Elisabete Xavier Gomes (2012). The (Un)Bearable Educational Lightness of Common Practices: On the Use of Urban Spaces by Schoolchildren. Studies in Philosophy and Education 31 (3):289-302.
    The present paper is about the author’s current research on children’s education in urban contexts. It departs from the rising offer of programmes for school children in out-of-school contexts (e.g. museums, libraries, science centres). It asks what makes these practices educational (and not just interesting, entertaining and/or audience building). Based on Biesta ( 2006a , 2010 ) theory of education, the author frames and analyses the educational characteristics of, and possibilities of articulating, in and out-of-school educational practices. This paper (...)
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  10.  7
    Peter J. Taylor, Michael Hoyler & David M. Evans (2008). A Geohistorical Study of 'The Rise of Modern Science': Mapping Scientific Practice Through Urban Networks, 1500–1900. [REVIEW] Minerva 46 (4):391-410.
    Using data on the ‘career’ paths of one thousand ‘leading scientists’ from 1450 to 1900, what is conventionally called the ‘rise of modern science’ is mapped as a changing geography of scientific practice in urban networks. Four distinctive networks of scientific practice are identified. A primate network centred on Padua and central and northern Italy in the sixteenth century expands across the Alps to become a polycentric network in the seventeenth century, which in turn dissipates into a weak polycentric (...)
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  11.  19
    Shane Epting (2016). An Applied Mereology of the City: Unifying Science and Philosophy for Urban Planning. Science and Engineering Ethics 22 (5):1361-1374.
    Based on their research showing that growing cities follow basic principles, two theoretical physicists, Luis Bettencourt and Geoffrey West, call for researchers and professionals to contribute to a grand theory of urban sustainability. In their research, they develop a ‘science of the city’ to help urban planners address problems that arise from population increases. Although they provide valuable insights for understanding urban sustainability issues, they do not give planners a manageable way to approach such problems. I argue (...)
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  12.  6
    Mindy Thompson Fullilove & Michel Cantal-Dupart (2016). Medicine for the City: Perspective and Solidarity as Tools for Making Urban Health. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 13 (2):215-221.
    The United States has pursued policies of urban upheaval that have undermined social organization, dispersed people, particularly African Americans, and increased rates of disease and disorder. Healthcare institutions have been, and can be, a part of this problem or a part of the solution. This essay addresses two tools that healthcare providers can use to repair the urban ecosystem—perspective and solidarity. Perspective addresses both our ability to envision solutions and our ability to see in the space in which (...)
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  13.  23
    Marcus Foth (2010). Participation, Animation, Design: A Tripartite Approach to Urban Community Networking. [REVIEW] AI and Society 25 (3):335-343.
    Theories of networked individualism and forms of urban alienation challenge the continued purpose and relevance of conventional community tools in urban neighbourhood. However, the majority of urban residents surveyed in this research still believe that there are people living in their immediate neighbourhood who may share their interests or who are at least personally compatible, but they do not know them. Web-based community networking systems have the potential to facilitate intra-neighbourhood interaction and support community-building efforts. Community networking (...)
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  14.  30
    David Fleming (1998). The Space of Argumentation: Urban Design, Civic Discourse, and the Dream of the Good City. [REVIEW] Argumentation 12 (2):147-166.
    In this paper, I explore connections between two disciplines not typically linked: argumentation theory and urban design. I first trace historical ties between the art of reasoned discourse and the idea of civic virtue. I next analyze discourse norms implicit in three theories of urban design: Jane Jacobs' The Death and Life of Great American Cities (1961), Christopher Alexander's A Pattern Language: Towns, Buildings, Construction (1977), and Peter Katz's The New Urbanism: Toward an Architecture of Community (1994). I (...)
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  15.  9
    Jorge Curiel-Esparza, Julian Canto-Perello & Maria A. Calvo (2004). Establishing Sustainable Strategies in Urban Underground Engineering. Science and Engineering Ethics 10 (3):523-530.
    Growth of urban areas, the corresponding increased demand for utility services and the possibility of new types of utility systems are overcrowding near surface underground space with urban utilities. Available subsurface space will continue to diminish to the point where utilidors (utility tunnels) may become inevitable. Establishing future sustainable strategies in urban underground engineering consists of the ability to lessen the use of traditional trenching. There is an increasing interest in utility tunnels for urban areas as (...)
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  16.  17
    Samantha Noll (2015). History Lessons: What Urban Environmental Ethics Can Learn From Nineteenth Century Cities. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 28 (1):143-159.
    In this paper, I outline valuable insights that current theorists working in urban environmental ethics can gain from the analysis of nineteenth century urban contexts. Specifically, I argue that an analysis of urban areas during this time reveals two sets of competing metaphysical commitments that, when accepted, shift both the design of urban environments and our relationship with the natural world in these contexts. While one set of metaphysical commitments could help inform current projects in (...) environmental ethics, the second “de-animalized” or “cleansed” commitments that influenced the structure of post-nineteenth century urban areas could potentially harm projects in urban environmental ethics. Thus we need to be particularly careful when choosing a metaphysical base for our current urban environmental ethics, as, depending on your specific project, implicitly accepting certain commitments could inadvertently work against the overall goals of the project. (shrink)
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  17.  11
    Hans Kjetil Lysgård & Oddgeir Tveiten (2005). Cultural Economy at Work in the City of Kristiansand: Cultural Policy as Incentive for Urban Innovation. [REVIEW] AI and Society 19 (4):485-499.
    In 2002, as part of its urban policy, the city of Kristiansand set up a giant foundation, for the purpose of soliciting projects, talents and strategies for growth in the city’s cultural economy. There was conflict over core values in the promotion of culture and heritage, and discussion on the transformation of power and democracy. The article assesses the challenges facing the foundation “Cultiva”, including institutional ramifications related to régimes of public planning and governance. Cultiva introduces new discourses of (...)
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  18.  12
    Christoph Brunner (2011). Nice-Looking Obstacles: Parkour as Urban Practice of Deterritorialization. [REVIEW] AI and Society 26 (2):143-152.
    Most academic publications refer to Parkour as a subversive and embodied tactic that challenges hegemonic discourses of discipline and control. Architecture becomes the playful ground where new ways to move take form. These approaches rarely address the material and embodied relations that occur in these practices and remain on the discursive plane of cultural signifiers. A theory of movement between bodies as the founding aspect of Parkour unfolds alternative concepts of body, space, time and movement beyond the discursive. Movement becomes (...)
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  19.  12
    Anne Wagner (2014). Game of Power Within the French Urban Landscape: A Socio-Legal Semiotic Analysis of Communication, Vision and Space. [REVIEW] International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 27 (1):161-182.
    This paper explores the role and impact of advertising in the French urban planning on citizens’ perception with a close examination of the implications and connections between citizens and outdoor advertising. Significant changes in quantity and form of outdoor advertising have been defined under French regulations. Our knowledge is now mass mediated in public spaces. More and more visible and gargantuan advertising signs surround and even invade our environment for strict commercial benefits. The ‘invasion’ of commercial signs can be (...)
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  20.  6
    Christopher Mayes (2014). An Agrarian Imaginary in Urban Life: Cultivating Virtues and Vices Through a Conflicted History. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 27 (2):265-286.
    This paper explores the influence and use of agrarian thought on collective understandings of food practices as sources of ethical and communal value in urban contexts. A primary proponent of agrarian thought that this paper engages is Paul Thompson and his exceptional book, The Agrarian Vision. Thompson aims to use agrarian ideals of agriculture and communal life to rethink current issues of sustainability and environmental ethics. However, Thompson perceives the current cultural mood as hostile to agrarian virtue. There are (...)
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  21.  3
    Daniel Tumminelli O'Brien (2012). Managing the Urban Commons. Human Nature 23 (4):467-489.
    All communities have common resources that are vulnerable to selfish motives. The current paper explores this challenge in the specific case of the urban commons, defined as the public spaces and scenery of city neighborhoods. A theoretical model differentiates between individual incentives and social incentives for caring for the commons. The quality of a commons is defined as the level of physical (e.g., loose garbage) and social (e.g., public disturbances) disorder. A first study compared levels of disorder across the (...)
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  22. A. Berleant (1986). Cultivating an Urban Aesthetic. Diogenes 34 (136):1-18.
  23. Joshua Anderson (2012). Huey P. Newton and the Radicalization of the Urban Poor. In Leonard R. Koos (ed.), Hidden Cities: Understanding Urban Popcultures. Inter-Disciplinary Press
    Huey P. Newton, founder of the Black Panther Party, is perhaps one of the most interesting and intriguing American intellectuals from the last half of the 20th century. Newton’s genius rested in his ability to amalgamate and synthesize others’ thinking, and then reinterpreting and making it relevant to the situation that existed in the United States in his time, particularly for African-Americans in the densely populated urban centers in the North and West. Newton saw himself continuing the Marxist-Leninist tradition (...)
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  24.  12
    John R. Taylor & Sarah Taylor Lovell (2014). Urban Home Food Gardens in the Global North: Research Traditions and Future Directions. Agriculture and Human Values 31 (2):285-305.
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  25.  38
    Stefan Kipfer & Kanishka Goonewardena (2013). Urban Marxism and the Post-Colonial Question: Henri Lefebvre and 'Colonisation'. Historical Materialism 21 (2):76-116.
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  26.  28
    Clare Palmer (2003). Placing Animals in Urban Environmental Ethics. Journal of Social Philosophy 34 (1):64–78.
  27.  8
    Greg Sharzer (2012). A Critique of Localist Political Economy and Urban Agriculture. Historical Materialism 20 (4):75-114.
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  28.  4
    Peter Allingham (2008). Cars, Aesthetics and Urban Development. Knowledge, Technology and Policy 21 (3):115-123.
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  29.  4
    Harri Veivo (2008). Authors on the Outskirts: Writing Projects and Urban Space in Contemporary French Literature. Knowledge, Technology and Policy 21 (3):131-141.
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  30.  3
    Pierre Dagenais, Alain Vanasse, Josiane Courteau, Maria Gabriela Orzanco & Shabnam Asghari (2010). Disparities Between Rural and Urban Areas for Osteoporosis Management in the Province of Quebec Following the Canadian 2002 Guidelines Publication. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 16 (3):438-444.
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  31.  2
    Hanne Cecilie Geirbo (2011). The Community Power Concept: Mitigating Urban-Rural Digital Divide with Renewable Energy Mini Grids. Iris 34.
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  32.  2
    Christian Jantzen & Mikael Vetner (2008). Designing Urban Experiences. The Case of Zuidas, Amsterdam. Knowledge, Technology and Policy 21 (4):149-162.
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  33.  1
    M. A. Min, Jiang Jin, Wang di, Joseph W. Esherick & L. U. Hanchao (2008). The Symposium on Urban Popular Culture in Modern China. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 3 (4):499-532.
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  34. Matthew Crippen (forthcoming). Intuitive Cities: Pre-Reflective, Aesthetic and Political Aspects of Urban Design. Journal of Aesthetics and Phenomenology.
    Evidence affirms that aesthetic engagement patterns our movements, often with us barely aware. This invites an examination of pre-reflective engagement within cities and also aesthetic experience as a form of the pre-reflective. The invitation is amplified because design has political implications. For instance, it can draw people in or exclude them by establishing implicitly recognized public-private boundaries. The Value Sensitive Design school, which holds that artifacts embody ethical and political values, stresses some of this. But while emphasizing that design embodies (...)
     
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  35. Dick Allen Rader (1991). Christian Ethics in an African Context: A Focus on Urban Zambia. P. Lang.
  36.  22
    Daniel R. Block, Noel Chávez, Erika Allen & Dinah Ramirez (2012). Food Sovereignty, Urban Food Access, and Food Activism: Contemplating the Connections Through Examples From Chicago. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 29 (2):203-215.
    The idea of food sovereignty has its roots primarily in the response of small producers in developing countries to decreasing levels of control over land, production practices, and food access. While the concerns of urban Chicagoans struggling with low food access may seem far from these issues, the authors believe that the ideas associated with food sovereignty will lead to the construction of solutions to what is often called the “food desert” issue that serve and empower communities in ways (...)
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  37. Elsa M. Lankford (2009). Urban Soundscapes as Indicators of Urban Health. Environment, Space, Place 1 (2):27-50.
    Cities of the past enjoyed rich soundscapes full of organic sounds. Such sounds can be hard to hear, even for those that are listening, in many of today’s cities and neighborhoods. Evaluating the sounds of life in urban neighborhoods can be one method of determining the health and vibrancy of an area. A silent neighborhood, one not devoid of sound or noise, but rather missing the sounds of human and animal life, can be detrimental to the community and its (...)
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  38. Scott Tate (2012). Everyday Life, Tinkering, and Full Participation in the Urban Cultural Imaginary. Environment, Space, Place 4 (2):104-129.
    Cities around the globe are immersed in transnational projects of place reconfiguration and attraction. Urban places, intent on competing in the globalized experience-based economy, undertake identity projects—on-going, dynamic processes through which places are produced and reproduced by conscious strategies of place making and identity building (see, for example, Nyseth and Viken 2009). In this article, I employ Henri Lefebvre’s conceptions of a “right to the city” in order to explore the right to full participation in imagining and shaping (...) futures. Spatial practices, such as those I term civic tinkering, may offer one way to help enable such imagining.My discussion draws from scholarship on imaginaries and place identity, as well as on my own qualitative field studies conducted in Roanoke, Virginia, in the United States, and Belfast, Northern Ireland in the United Kingdom. While my precise research questions differed in these two sites, I explored, in each instance, the processes of place identification and development centered on arts and culture, and the extent to which marginal groups and their concerns were engaged or considered in such processes. I also explore “tinkering” as a set of activities that hold potential for residents to more fully participate in the urban project byconstructing, altering, and disrupting spatial meanings. Tinkering may be any impermanent, unsanctioned, and informal activity endeavoring to positively alter a city’s identity. Henri Lefebvre described the relevance of such practices in his vision of the city as oeuvre, or ongoing project. (shrink)
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  39.  22
    Benard Marianne & de Cock Buning Tjard (2013). Exploring the Potential of Dutch Pig Farmers and Urban-Citizens to Learn Through Frame Reflection. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 26 (5):1015-1036.
    The Dutch pig husbandry has become a topic of public debate. One underlying cause is that pig farmers and urban-citizens have different perspectives and underlying norms, values and truths on pig husbandry and animal welfare. One way of dealing with such conflicts involves a learning process in which a shared vision is developed. A prerequisite for this process is that both parties become aware of their own fixed patterns of thoughts, actions, and blind spots. Therefore, we conducted five homogeneous (...)
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  40. Evert Vandeweghe (2011). Staging Urban History. Environment, Space, Place 3 (2):122-159.
    Parades were an intrinsic part of urban life in Belgium between the middle of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Scholars have used these festivities time and again to probe into nationalism and the growing political tensions of the time. However, much less attention has been paid to the relation between these parades and the townscape itself. This article tries to fill this gap by exploring how urban festivities can reveal the differing ways in which small-town populations coped with (...)
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  41.  20
    Lois Wright Morton, Ella Annette Bitto, Mary Jane Oakland & Mary Sand (2008). Accessing Food Resources: Rural and Urban Patterns of Giving and Getting Food. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 25 (1):107-119.
    Reciprocity and redistribution economies are often used by low-income households to increase access to food, adequate diets, and food security. A United States study of two high poverty rural counties and two low-income urban neighborhoods reveal poor urban households are more likely to access food through the redistribution economy than poor rural households. Reciprocal nonmarket food exchanges occur more frequently in low-income rural households studied compared to low-income urban ones. The rural low-income purposeful sample was significantly more (...)
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  42. Jean Anyon (2005). Radical Possibilities: Public Policy, Urban Education, and a New Social Movement. Routledge.
    Jean Anyon's groundbreaking new book reveals the influence of federal and metropolitan policies and practices on the poverty that plagues schools and communities in American cities and segregated, low-income suburbs. Public policies...such as those regulating the minimum wage, job availability, tax rates, federal transit, and affordable housing...all create conditions in urban areas that no education policy as currently conceived can transcend. In this first book since her best-selling _Ghetto Schooling_, Jean Anyon argues that we must replace these federal and (...)
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  43.  13
    Roberto Colom, Carmen E. Flores-Mendoza & Francisco J. Abad (2007). Generational Changes on the Draw-a-Man Test: A Comparison of Brazilian Urban and Rural Children Tested in 1930, 2002 and 2004. [REVIEW] Journal of Biosocial Science 39 (1):79-89.
    Although gains in generational intelligence test scores have been widely demonstrated around the world, researchers still do not know what has caused them. The cognitive stimulation and nutritional hypotheses summarize the several diverse potential causes that have been considered. This article analyses data for a sample of 499 children tested in 1930 and one equivalent sample of 710 children tested 72 years later, the largest gap ever considered. Both samples comprised children aged between 7 and 11 who were assessed by (...)
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  44.  22
    Anita Cava & Don Mayer (2007). Integrative Social Contract Theory and Urban Prosperity Initiatives. Journal of Business Ethics 72 (3):263-278.
    Urban communities in 21st century America are facing severe economic challenges, ones that suggest a mandate to contemplate serious changes in the way America does business. The middle class is diminishing in many parts of the country, with consequences for the economy as a whole. When faced with the loss of its economic base, any business community must make some difficult decisions about its proper role and responsibilities. Decisions to support the community must be balanced alongside and against responsibilities (...)
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  45.  35
    Jane Jacobs & Urban Visionary (2007). The Death and Life of a Reluctant Urban Icon. Journal of Libertarian Studies 21 (3):115-36.
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  46.  3
    Anne Wagner (2011). French Urban Space Management: A Visual Semiotic Approach Behind Power and Control. [REVIEW] International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 24 (2):227-241.
    The paper will discuss the role of the visual in French urban space. It will reveal the close connections between visual and semiotics where the visual dimension is central rather than marginal. We will evaluate altogether the psychological, legal and social impacts of the new shapes of our own environment. Rethinking our public space shapes our identities, unveils the ‘hidden’ powerful discourse behind these new urban models.
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  47.  60
    Abraham Akkerman (2001). Urban Planning in the Founding of Cartesian Thought. Philosophy and Geography 4 (2):141 – 167.
    It is a matter of tacit consensus that rationalist adeptness in urban planning traces its foundations to the philosophy of the Renaissance thinker and mathematician Ren Descartes. This study suggests, in turn, that the planned urban environment of the Renaissance may have also led Descartes, and his intellectual peers, to tenets that became the foundations of modern philosophy and science. The geometric street pattern of the late middle ages and the Renaissance, the planned townscapes, street views and the (...)
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  48.  8
    Rob Stephenson, Zoe Matthews & J. W. Mcdonald (2003). The Impact of Rural–Urban Migration on Under-Two Mortality in India. Journal of Biosocial Science 35 (1):15-31.
    This paper examines the impact of ruralurban migrant and non-migrant groups. The selectivity of ruralurban migrants and rural non-migrants. Problems faced by migrants in assimilating into urban societies create mortality differentials between ruralchild mortality. Further research is needed to understand the health care needs of rural–urban migrants in order to inform the provision of appropriate health care.
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  49.  1
    Carlo Raffo (2011). Educational Equity in Poor Urban Contexts - Exploring Issues of Place/Space and Young People's Identity and Agency. British Journal of Educational Studies 59 (1):1 - 19.
    An enduring concern for educational policy in many affluent countries is the endemic nature of educational inequalities that are predominately located in poor urban contexts. Given the inabilities of school reform per se to deal with these inequalities, the paper focuses on issues of scarcity and spatial processes that are implicated in the formation of young people's educational identities - identities that then mediate the conversion of educational resources into educational attainments or achievements.
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  50.  29
    Andrew Light (2003). Urban Ecological Citizenship. Journal of Social Philosophy 34 (1):44–63.
    There are many ways to describe cities. As a physical environment, more so than many other environments, they are at least an extension of our present intentions. But cities are not confined to the moment. Built spaces are also in conversation with the past and oriented toward the future as physical manifestations of our values and priorities. But even with all of the ways we have to describe cities we do not normally think of them as in any way akin (...)
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