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Profile: Ursula Coope (Oxford University)
  1. Ursula Coope (2013). Aquinas on Judgment and the Active Power of Reason. Philosophers' Imprint 13 (20).
    This paper examines Aquinas’ account of a certain kind of rational control: the control one exercises in using one’s reason to make a judgment. Though this control is not itself a kind of voluntary control, it is a precondition for voluntariness. Aquinas claims that one’s voluntary actions must spring from judgments that are subject to one’s rational control and that, because of this, only rational animals can act voluntarily. This rational kind of control depends on a certain distinctive feature of (...)
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  2. Ursula Coope (2012). ‘Aristotle’s Physics VII.3. 246a10-246b3’. In S. Maso & C. Natali (eds.), Reading Aristotle Physics VII.3: ‘What is alteration?’.
     
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  3. Ursula Coope (2012). &Quot;aristotle on the Infinite&Quot;. In Christopher Shields (ed.), Oxford Handbook of Aristotle. Oxford University Press. 267.
  4. Ursula Coope (2012). Why Does Aristotle Think That Ethical Virtue is Required for Practical Wisdom? Phronesis 57 (2):142-163.
    Abstract In this paper, I ask why Aristotle thinks that ethical virtue (rather than mere self-control) is required for practical wisdom. I argue that a satisfactory answer will need to explain why being prone to bad appetites implies a failing of the rational part of the soul. I go on to claim that the self-controlled person does suffer from such a rational failing: a failure to take a specifically rational kind of pleasure in fine action. However, this still leaves a (...)
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  5. Ursula Coope (2010). ‘Aristotle on Voluntariness and Choice’. In C. Sandis (ed.), Blackwell Companion to Action. Blackwell.
  6. Ursula Coope (2009). Aristotle : Time and Change. In Robin Le Poidevin (ed.), The Routledge Companion to Metaphysics. Routledge.
  7. Ursula Coope (2009). ‘Change and its Relation to Actuality and Potentiality'. In G. Anagnostopoulos (ed.), A Companion to Aristotle. Blackwells.
     
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  8. Ursula Coope (2008). Space, Time, Matter, and Form: Essays on Aristotle's Physics - by David Bostock. Philosophical Books 49 (3):250-251.
  9. Ursula Coope (2007). Aristotle on Action. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 81 (1):109–138.
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  10. Ursula Coope (2005). Colloquium 5: Aristotle's Account of Agency in Physics III 3. Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 20 (1):201-227.
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  11. Ursula Coope (2005). Review of Paolo Crivelli, Aristotle on Truth. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2005 (11).
  12. Ursula Coope (2005). Time for Aristotle: Physics Iv.10-14. Oxford University Press.
    What is the relation between time and change? Does time depend on the mind? Is the present always the same or is it always different? Aristotle tackles these questions in the Physics. In the first book in English exclusively devoted to this discussion, Ursula Coope argues that Aristotle sees time as a universal order within which all changes are related to each other. This interpretation enables her to explain two striking Aristotelian claims: that the now is like a moving thing, (...)
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  13. Ursula Coope (2005). Time for Aristotle: Physics Iv. Oxford University Press.
    What is the relation between time and change? Does time depend on the mind? Is the present always the same or is it always different? Aristotle tackles these questions in the Physics. In the first book in English exclusively devoted to this discussion, Ursula Coope argues that Aristotle sees time as a universal order within which all changes are related to each other. This interpretation enables her to explain two striking Aristotelian claims: that the now is like a moving thing, (...)
     
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  14. Ursula Coope (2004). 'Aristotle's Account of Agency in Physics III.3'. Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium in Ancient Philosophy.
     
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  15. Ursula Coope (2001). Why Does Aristotle Say That There is No Time Without Change? Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 101 (3):359–367.