Search results for 'Utopias History' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  2
    Nicole Pohl (2015). Utopias: A Brief History From Ancient Writings to Virtual Communities by Howard P. Segal. Utopian Studies 26 (2):402-404.
    Howard P. Segal is well known to the utopian scholarly community, particularly with his excellent work on technology and utopianism in publications such as Technological Utopianism in American Culture, Future Imperfect: The Mixed Blessings of Technology in America, Technology in America: A Brief History, and Recasting the Machine Age: Henry Ford’s Village Industries. His most recent book, Utopias: A Brief History from Ancient Writings to Virtual Communities, is part of the Wiley-Blackwell Brief Histories of Religion Series and (...)
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  2. S. Sousedik (1992). The Place of Comenius General Consultation in the History of Modern Utopias. Filosoficky Casopis 40 (1):51-56.
     
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  3. E. M. Cioran (1998). History and Utopia. University of Chicago Press.
     
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  4. Judith A. Little (ed.) (2007). Feminist Philosophy and Science Fiction: Utopias and Dystopias. Prometheus Books.
     
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  5.  11
    Carolina Armenteros (2012). 'True Love' and Rousseau's Philosophy of History. Journal of the Philosophy of History 6 (2):258-282.
    Rousseau, a philosopher of history? The suggestion may startle those who know him as an enemy of history, the founder of Counter-Enlightenment who rejected his century’s hope in progress and conjured quasi-utopias devoid of time. Alone, the political texts seem to justify this interpretation. Side by side with the Emile and Julie sagas, however, they disclose a new Rousseau, the weaver of a master plot that governs private and public history. This essay describes (...)
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  6. Paul Ricœur (1986). Lectures on Ideology and Utopia. Columbia University Press.
     
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  7. Daryl H. Rice (1998). A Guide to Plato's Republic. Oxford University Press.
    A Guide to Plato's Republic provides an integral interpretation of the Republic that is accessible even to readers approaching Plato's masterwork for the first time. Written at a level understandable to undergraduates, it is ideal for students and other readers who have little or no background in philosophy or political theory. Rice anticipates their inevitable reactions to the Republic and treats them seriously, opening the way to an appreciation of the complexities of the text without oversimplifying it. While many books (...)
     
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  8. T. V. Artemʹeva (2005). Ot Slavnogo Proshlogo K Svetlomu Budushchemu: Filosofii͡a Istorii I Utopii͡a V Rossii Ėpokhi Prosveshchenii͡a. Aleteĭi͡a.
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  9. Renata Aleksandrovna Galʹt͡seva (2008). Znaki Ėpokhi: Filosofskai͡a Polemika. Letniĭ Sad.
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  10. Robbin S. Johnson (1969). More's Utopia: Ideal and Illusion. New Haven, Yale University Press.
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  11. Alain Martineau (1986). Herbert Marcuse's Utopia. Harvest House.
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  12.  18
    Nickolas Pappas (1995). Routledge Philosophy Guidebook to Plato and the Republic. Routledge.
    In this second edition of the highly successfulRoutledge Philosophy GuideBook to Plato and theRepublic, Nickolas Pappas extends his exploration of the text to ...
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  13. Giuseppe Peota (2010). Ali, Derive E Naufragi: Passioni E Utopie Nell'eredità Dell'illuminismo Francese, 1750-1789. Aracne.
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  14.  1
    Carlos Ferrera & Juan Pro (2015). Introduction: Utopias and Dystopias in Modern Spain. Utopian Studies 26 (2):326-328.
    Utopianism has found expression in several ways throughout history and has reflected the peculiarities of the cultural, political, social, and economic settings in which it has come about. Spain in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries has been no exception, because while the country has not occupied a significant place in the dominant historical narrative of utopias, recent research has begun to show that it was indeed where many tracts with utopian—and, by way of correlation, dystopian—content came on the (...)
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  15. Francis Bacon, William Rawley & Thomas Cecill (1639). Sylva Sylvarvm:, or, a Naturall Historie. In ten Centvries. Printed by John Haviland, for William Lee, and Are to Be Sold at the Great Turks Head Next to the Mitre Taverne in Fleetstreet.
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  16.  19
    D. P. Chattopadhyaya (1997). Sociology, Ideology, and Utopia: Socio-Political Philosophy of East and West. Brill.
    Yet this work is a sustained plea for improvable understanding between the East and the West and the transcultural value orientation of different cultures.
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  17. Wilhelm Kamlah (1969). Utopie, Eschatologie, Geschichtsteleologie Kritische Untersuchungen Zum Ursprung Und Zum Futuristischen Denken der Neuzeit. Bibliographisches Institut.
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  18. Ruurd Veldhuis (1975). Realism Versus Utopianism?: Reinhold Niebuhr's Christian Realism and the Relevance of Utopian Thought for Social Ethics. Van Gorcum.
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  19.  13
    Philip Pomper (2005). The History and Theory of Empires. History and Theory 44 (4):1–27.
    Contemporary histories and theories of empire generally remain within boundaries inspired by varieties of liberalism, and by Marxian theory and its hybrids, in which changing modes of production determine the forms of power, including empire. Liberal theorists and historians of empire generally trace a complex process in which expanding imperial power systems led ultimately to nation-states, democracy, and market economies. For Marxists and postmodern theorists, the formal aspects of empire remain unimportant compared to the broader workings of modes of production (...)
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  20.  81
    Antonis Balasopoulos (2014). Factories, Utopias, Decoration and Upholstery: On Utopia, Modernism, and Everyday Life. Utopian Studies 25 (2):268-298.
    To the extent that the nature of the relationship between utopian and modernist fiction has preoccupied literary history at all, such reflection has tended to be overshadowed by the devastating irony with which Virginia Woolf treats the fiction of H. G. Wells, among other prominent writers of the so-called Edwardian period. In two interrelated essays originally published between 1923 and 1924—“Mr Bennett and Mrs Brown” and “ Character in Fiction”—Woolf inverts Arnold Bennett’s pejorative estimation of the modernists’ novelistic craft (...)
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  21.  12
    Timothy Chappell (2008). Utopias and the Art of the Possible. Analyse & Kritik 30 (1).
    I begin this paper by examining what MacIntyre has to tell us about radical disagreements: how they have arisen, and how to deal with them, within a polity. I conclude by radically disagreeing with Macintyre: I shall suggest that he offers no credible alternative to liberalism's account of radical disagreements and how to deal with them. To put it dilemmatically: insofar as what MacIntyre says is credible, it is not an alternative to liberalism; insofar as he presents a genuine alternative (...)
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  22.  5
    Pablo Antillano (2012). La profecía de Huxley y el siglo biotech: La sociedad posthumana nos alcanza. Apuntes Filosóficos 20 (38):105-125.
    Resumen Hace 78 años, en “Un Mundo Feliz”, el escritor Aldous Huxley, en un prodigioso tono satírico, se anticipó con asombrosa precisión a los grandes temas de la agenda científica y política del Siglo XXI: la reproducción controlada, el choque de civilizaciones y la clonación humana, entre otros. Hace unos días, a mediados de mayo de 2010, el J. Craig Venter Institute anunció que había producido la primera célula sin historia genética creada en un laboratorio a partir de un genoma (...)
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  23.  14
    Evgeny Dobrenko (2011). Utopias of Return: Notes on (Post-)Soviet Culture and its Frustrated (Post-)Modernisation. Studies in East European Thought 63 (2):159-171.
    This article discusses the role of representative strategies in twentieth-century Russian culture. Just as Russia interacted with Europe in the Marquis de Custine’s time via discourse and representation, in the twentieth century Russia re-entered European consciousness by simulating ‘socialism’. In the post-Soviet era, the nation aspired to be admitted to the ‘European house’ by simulating a ‘market economy’, ‘democracy’, and ‘postmodernism’. But in reality Russia remains the same country as before, torn between the reality of its own helplessness and poverty, (...)
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  24.  10
    Evgeny Dobrenko (2011). Erratum To: Utopias of Return: Notes on (Post-)Soviet Culture and its Frustrated (Post-)Modernization. Studies in East European Thought 63 (2):173-173.
    This article discusses the role of representative strategies in twentieth-century Russian culture. Just as Russia interacted with Europe in the Marquis de Custine’s time via discourse and representation, in the twentieth century Russia re-entered European consciousness by simulating ‘socialism’. In the post-Soviet era, the nation aspired to be admitted to the ‘European house’ by simulating a ‘market economy’, ‘democracy’, and ‘postmodernism’. But in reality Russia remains the same country as before, torn between the reality of its own helplessness and poverty, (...)
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  25.  1
    Robert Colls (1993). Labour's Utopias. Bolshevism, Fabianism, Social Democracy. History of European Ideas 17 (2-3):381-382.
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  26. Terrell Carver (1993). Peter Beilharz, "Labour's Utopias: Bolshevism, Fabianism, Social Democracy". [REVIEW] History of Political Thought 14 (2):324.
     
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  27. Timothy Chappell (2008). Radical Disagreement: Utopias and the Art of the Possible. Analyse & Kritik 30 (1):179-203.
    I begin this paper by examining what MacIntyre has to tell us about radical disagreements: how they have arisen, and how to deal with them, within a polity. I conclude by radically disagreeing with Macintyre: I shall suggest that he offers no credible alternative to liberalism’s account of radical disagreements and how to deal with them. To put it dilemmatically: insofar as what MacIntyre says is credible, it is not an alternative to liberalism; insofar as he presents a genuine alternative (...)
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  28. David Clay Large (1994). Old Dreams of a New Reich: Volkisch Utopias and National Socialism. History of European Ideas 18 (6):1016-1017.
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  29. Mary Midgley (1998). Book Notices-Utopias, Dolphins and Computers. Problems in Philosophical Plumbing. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 20 (3):378-378.
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  30. Ellis Shookman (1993). Fantasies on the Fringe: Romantic Concepts of Nationalism in Utopias Set at the Edges of Nineteenth-Century Europe. History of European Ideas 16 (4-6):647-654.
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  31. Jim Smyth (1993). Nationalist Nightmares and Postmodernist Utopias: Irish Society in Transition. History of European Ideas 16 (1-3):157-163.
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  32. María Alejandra Vanney (2013). La utopía del "retorno” de Leo Strauss frente a las utopías modernas. Giornale di Metafisica 2.
    Strauss claims that the general crisis in Western world is closely related to the crisis which political philosophy as such is undergoing. Apart from that, the latter is the result of the revolutionary changes introduced by the creators of modern political philosophy, whose conclusions insist that it is necessary to break with tradition in order to construe a new political science. The article examines the straussian’s vision of Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke and finally, Nietzsche. Based on this description, Strauss proposes that (...)
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  33.  7
    Giuseppe Veltri (2009). Renaissance Philosophy in Jewish Garb: Foundations and Challenges in Judaism on the Eve of Modernity. Brill.
    Introduction: in search of a Jewish renaissance -- Jewish philosophy: humanist roots of a contradiction in terms -- The prophetic-poetic dimension of philosophy: the ars poetica and Immanuel of Rome -- Leone Ebreo's concept of Jewish philosophy -- Conceptions of history: Azariah de Rossi -- Scientific thought and the exegetical mind, with an essay on the life and works of Rabbi Judah Loew -- Mathematical and biblical exegesis: Jewish sources of Athanasius Kircher's musical theory -- Creating geographical and political (...)
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  34.  5
    Krishan Kumar (2003). Aspects of the Western Utopian Tradition. History of the Human Sciences 16 (1):63-77.
    The western utopia has both classical and Judaeo-Christian roots. From the Greeks came the form of the ideal city, based on reason, from Jews and Christians the idea of deliverance through a messiah and the culmination of history in the millennium. The Greek conception placed utopia in an ideal space, the Christian conception in an ideal time. The modern utopia, dating from Thomas More's Utopia (1516), drew upon both these traditions but added something distinctive of its own. Following More, (...)
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  35. Maria Rosa Antognazza (2015). The Benefit to Philosophy of the Study of its History. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 23 (1):161-184.
    This paper advances the view that the history of philosophy is both a kind of history and a kind of philosophy. Through a discussion of some examples from epistemology, metaphysics, and the historiography of philosophy, it explores the benefit to philosophy of a deep and broad engagement with its history. It comes to the conclusion that doing history of philosophy is a way to think outside the box (...)
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  36.  14
    Joeri Witteveen (forthcoming). Suppressing Synonymy with a Homonym: The Emergence of the Nomenclatural Type Concept in Nineteenth Century Natural History. Journal of the History of Biology.
    ‘Type’ in biology is a polysemous term. In a landmark article, Paul Farber (Journal of the History of Biology 9(1): 93–119, 1976) argued that this deceptively plain term had acquired three different meanings in early nineteenth century natural history alone. ‘Type’ was used in relation to three distinct type concepts, each of them associated with a different set of practices. Important as Farber’s analysis has been for the historiography of natural history, his account conceals (...)
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  37.  14
    Francis Fukuyama (1992/2006). The End of History and the Last Man. Free Press ;.
    Ever since its first publication in 1992, The End of History and the Last Man has provoked controversy and debate. Francis Fukuyama's prescient analysis of religious fundamentalism, politics, scientific progress, ethical codes, and war is as essential for a world fighting fundamentalist terrorists as it was for the end of the Cold War. Now updated with a new afterword, The End of History and the Last Man is a modern classic.
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  38. Ericka Tucker (2013). The Subject of History: Historical Subjectivity and Historical Science. Journal of the Philosophy of History 7 (2):205-229.
    In this paper, I show how the phenomenological and hermeneutic traditions and method converge on their treatment of the historical subject. Thinkers from both traditions claim that subjectivity is shaped by a historical worldview. Each tradition provides an account of how these worldviews are shaped, and thus how essentially historical subjective experience is molded. I argue that both traditions, although offering helpful ways of understanding the way history shapes subjectivity, go too far in their epistemic claims for the superiority (...)
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  39.  45
    Robert A. Wilson (2015). The Role of Oral History in Surviving a Eugenic Past. In Steven High (ed.), Beyond Testimony and Trauma: Oral History in the Aftermath of Mass Violence. 119-138.
    Despite the fact that the history of eugenics in Canada is necessarily part of the larger history of eugenics, there is a special role for oral history to play in the telling of this story, a role that promises to shift us from the muddled middle of the story. Not only has the testimony of eugenics survivors already played perhaps the most important role in revealing much about the practice of eugenics in Canada, but the willingness and (...)
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  40. Paul Redding (2013). The Necessity of History for Philosophy – Even Analytic Philosophy. Journal of the Philosophy of History 7 (3):299-325.
    Analytic philosophers are often said to be indifferent or even hostile to the history of philosophy – that is, not to the idea of history of philosophy as such, but regarded as a species of the genus philosophy rather than the genus history. Here it is argued that such an attitude is actually inconsistent with approaches within the philosophies of mind that are typical within analytic philosophy. It is suggested that the common “argument rather than pedigree” claim (...)
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  41.  7
    Marianne Sommer (2008). History in the Gene: Negotiations Between Molecular and Organismal Anthropology. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 41 (3):473 - 528.
    In the advertising discourse of human genetic database projects, of genetic ancestry tracing companies, and in popular books on anthropological genetics, what I refer to as the anthropological gene and genome appear as documents of human history, by far surpassing the written record and oral history in scope and accuracy as archives of our past. How did macromolecules become "documents of human evolutionary history"? Historically, molecular anthropology, a term introduced by Emile Zuckerkandl in 1962 (...)
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  42.  20
    Gary Hatfield (2005). The History of Philosophy as Philosophy. In Tom Sorell & G. A. J. Rogers (eds.), Analytic Philosophy and History of Philosophy. Oxford University Press 82-128.
    The chapter begins with an initial survey of ups and downs of contextualist history of philosophy during the twentieth century in Britain and America, which finds that historically serious history of philosophy has been on the rise. It then considers ways in which the study of past philosophy has been used and is used in philosophy, and makes a case for the philosophical value and necessity of a contextually oriented approach. It examines some uses of past texts and (...)
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  43. Ian Hunter (2007). The History of Philosophy and the Persona of the Philosopher. Modern Intellectual History 4 (3):571-600.
    Although history is the pre-eminent part of the gallant sciences, philosophers advise against it from fear that it might completely destroy the kingdom of darkness—that is, scholastic philosophy—which previously has been wrongly held to be a necessary instrument of theology.
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  44. Pauline Kleingeld (1999). Kant, History, and the Idea of Moral Development. History of Philosophy Quarterly 16 (1):59-80.
    I examine the consistency of Kant's notion of moral progress as found in his philosophy of history. To many commentators, Kant's very idea of moral development has seemed inconsistent with basic tenets of his critical philosophy. This idea has seemed incompatible with his claims that the moral law is unconditionally and universally valid, that moral agency is noumenal and atemporal, and that all humans are equally free. Against these charges, I argue not only that Kant's notion of moral development (...)
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  45. Aaron D. Cobb (2011). History and Scientific Practice in the Construction of an Adequate Philosophy of Science: Revisiting a Whewell/Mill Debate. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 42 (1):85-93.
    William Whewell raised a series of objections concerning John Stuart Mill’s philosophy of science which suggested that Mill’s views were not properly informed by the history of science or by adequate reflection on scientific practices. The aim of this paper is to revisit and evaluate this incisive Whewellian criticism of Mill’s views by assessing Mill’s account of Michael Faraday’s discovery of electrical induction. The historical evidence demonstrates that Mill’s reconstruction is an inadequate reconstruction of this historical episode (...)
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  46.  9
    Jan Plamper (2010). The History of Emotions: An Interview with William Reddy, Barbara Rosenwein, and Peter Stearns. History and Theory 49 (2):237-265.
    The history of emotions is a burgeoning field—so much so, that some are invoking an “emotional turn.” As a way of charting this development, I have interviewed three of the leading practitioners of the history of emotions: William Reddy, Barbara Rosenwein, and Peter Stearns. The interviews retrace each historian’s intellectual-biographical path to the history of emotions, recapitulate key concepts, and critically discuss the limitations of the available analytical tools. In doing so, they touch on Reddy’s concepts (...)
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  47.  67
    Serge Grigoriev (2012). Dewey: A Pragmatist View of History. Journal of the Philosophy of History 6 (2):173-194.
    Despite the centrality of the idea of history to Dewey's overall philosophical outlook, his brief treatment of philosophical issues in history has never attracted much attention, partly because of the dearth of the available material. Nonetheless, as argued in this essay, what we do have provides for the outlines of a comprehensive pragmatist view of history distinguished by an emphasis on methodological pluralism and a principled opposition to thinking of historical knowledge in correspondence terms. The key conceptions (...)
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  48.  18
    Richard W. Burkhardt (1999). Ethology, Natural History, the Life Sciences, and the Problem of Place. Journal of the History of Biology 32 (3):489 - 508.
    Investigators of animal behavior since the eighteenth century have sought to make their work integral to the enterprises of natural history and/or the life sciences. In their efforts to do so, they have frequently based their claims of authority on the advantages offered by the special places where they have conducted their research. The zoo, the laboratory, and the field have been major settings for animal behavior studies. The issue of the relative advantages of these different sites has been (...)
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  49.  76
    Anya Plutynski (2011). Four Problems of Abduction: A Brief History. Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 1 (2):227-248.
    Debates concerning the character, scope, and warrant of abductive inference have been active since Peirce first proposed that there was a third form of inference, distinct from induction and deduction. Abductive reasoning has been dubbed weak, incoherent, and even nonexistent. Part, at least, of the problem of articulating a clear sense of abductive inference is due to difficulty in interpreting Peirce. Part of the fault must lie with his critics, however. While this article will argue that Peirce indeed left a (...)
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  50.  4
    Mary E. Sunderland (2013). Modernizing Natural History: Berkeley's Museum of Vertebrate Zoology in Transition. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 46 (3):369-400.
    Throughout the twentieth century calls to modernize natural history motivated a range of responses. It was unclear how research in natural history museums would participate in the significant technological and conceptual changes that were occurring in the life sciences. By the 1960s, the Museum of Vertebrate Zoology at the University of California, Berkeley, was among the few university-based natural history museums that were able to maintain their specimen collections and support active research. The MVZ therefore provides a (...)
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