Search results for 'Utterance' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  31
    Dan López De Sa (2009). Relativizing Utterance-Truth? Synthese 170 (1):1 - 5.
    In recent years, some people have held that a radical relativist position is defensible in some philosophically interesting cases, including future contingents, predicates of personal taste, evaluative predicates in general, epistemic modals, and knowledge attributions. The position is frequently characterized as denying that utterance-truth is absolute. I argue that this characterization is inappropriate, as it requires a metaphysical substantive contention with which moderate views as such need not be committed. Before this, I also offer a more basic, admittedly less (...)
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  2.  30
    Riccardo Strobino (2011). Contexts of Utterance and Evaluation in Peter of Mantua's Obligationes. Vivarium 49 (1-3):275-299.
    In this paper I will examine the relation between the theory of obligations and its use in sophismatic contexts through the lens of certain pragmatic concerns. In order to do this, I will take a sophism discussed by Peter of Mantua in his treatise on obligations as a case-study. I will first provide a brief outline of the structure of the treatise and then examine a concrete case that shows how the relationship between background assumptions (casus and context of (...)) and criteria of response seems to suggest a way to qualify the application of general rules (especially for irrelevant sentences) in certain limit-cases. By discussing Peter's presentation of the sophism, I will also argue for a connection between Peter of Mantua's text and Mesino de Codronchi's Questiones on the De Interpretatione. (shrink)
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  3.  7
    Fred J. Kauffeld (2009). Grice's Analysis of Utterance-Meaning and Cicero's Catilinarian Apostrophe. Argumentation 23 (2):239-257.
    The pragmatics underlying Paul Grice’s analysis of utterance-meaning provide a powerful framework for investigating the commitments arguers undertake. Unfortunately, the complexity of Grice’s analysis has frustrated appropriate reliance on this important facet of his work. By explicating Cicero’s use of apostrophe in his famous “First Catilinarian” this essay attempts to show that a full complex of reflexive gricean speaker intentions in essentially to seriously saying and meaning something.
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  4.  5
    Osamu Sawada (2014). An Utterance Situation-Based Comparison. Linguistics and Philosophy 37 (3):205-248.
    The Japanese comparative adverb motto has two different uses. In the degree use, motto compares two individuals and denotes that there is a large gap between the target and a given standard with a norm-related presupposition. On the other hand, in the so-called ‘negative use’ it conveys the speaker’s attitude toward the utterance situation. I argue that similarly to the degree motto, the negative motto is a comparative morpheme, but unlike the degree motto it compares a current situation and (...)
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  5.  78
    B. A. Maher (2003). Schizophrenia, Aberrant Utterance and Delusions of Control: The Disconnection of Speech and Thought, and the Connection of Experience and Belief. Mind and Language 18 (1):1-22.
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  6.  23
    Athanassios Tzouvaras (1998). Logic of Knowledge and Utterance and the Liar. Journal of Philosophical Logic 27 (1):85-108.
    We extend the ordinary logic of knowledge based on the operator K and the system of axioms S₅ by adding a new operator Uφ, standing for "the agent utters φ", and certain axioms and a rule for U, forming thus a new system KU. The main advantage of KU is that we can express in it intentions of the speaker concerning the truth or falsehood of the claims he utters and analyze them logically. Specifically we can express in the new (...)
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  7. Dylan Dodd & Paula Sweeney (2010). Indexicals and Utterance Production. Philosophical Studies 150 (3):331-348.
    We distinguish, among other things, between the agent of the context, the speaker of the agent's utterance, the mechanism the agent uses to produce her utterance, and the tokening of the sentence uttered. Armed with these distinctions, we tackle the the ‘answer-machine’, ‘post-it note’ and other allegedly problematic cases, arguing that they can be handled without departing significantly from Kaplan's semantical framework for indexicals. In particular, we argue that these cases don't require adopting Stefano Predelli's intentionalism.
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  8.  41
    Marco Mazzone (2013). Attention to the Speaker. The Conscious Assessment of Utterance Interpretations in Working Memory. Language and Communication 33:106-114.
    The role of conscious attention in language processing has been scarcely considered, despite the wide-spread assumption that verbal utterances manage to attract and manipulate the addressee’s attention. Here I claim that this assumption is to be understood not as a figure of speech but instead in terms of attentional processes proper. This hypothesis can explain a fact that has been noticed by supporters of Relevance Theory in pragmatics: the special role played by speaker-related information in utterance interpretation. I argue (...)
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  9. Christopher Gauker (1998). What is a Context of Utterance? Philosophical Studies 91 (2):149-172.
    For many purposes in pragmatics one needs to appeal to a context of utterance conceived as a set of sentences or propositions. The context of utterance in this sense is often defined as the set of assumptions that the speaker supposes he or she shares with the hearer. I argue by stages that this is a mistake. First, if contexts must be defined in terms of shared assumptions, then it would be preferable to define the context as the (...)
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  10.  32
    Kathleen Stock (2011). Fictive Utterance and Imagining. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 85 (1):145-161.
    A popular approach to defining fictive utterance says that, necessarily, it is intended to produce imagining. I shall argue that this is not falsified by the fact that some fictive utterances are intended to be believed, or are non-accidentally true. That this is so becomes apparent given a proper understanding of the relation of what one imagines to one's belief set. In light of this understanding, I shall then argue that being intended to produce imagining is sufficient for fictive (...)
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  11.  55
    Graham Stevens (2009). Utterance at a Distance. Philosophical Studies 143 (2):213 - 221.
    In this paper I defend Kaplan’s claim that the sentence “I am here now” is logically true. A number of counter-examples to the claim have been proposed, including occurrences of the sentence in answerphone messages, written notes left for later decoding, etc. These counter-examples are only convincing if they can be shown to be cases where the correct context with respect to which the utterance should be evaluated is the context in which it is decoded rather than encoded. I (...)
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  12.  27
    Ian Munday (2009). Passionate Utterance and Moral Education. Journal of Philosophy of Education 43 (1):57-74.
    This paper explores Stanley Cavell's notion of 'passionate utterance', which acts as an extension of/departure from (we might read it as both) J. L. Austin's theory of the performative. Cavell argues that Austin having made the revolutionary discovery that truth claims in language are bound up with how words perform, then gets bogged by convention when discussing what is done 'by' words. In failing to account for the less predictable, unconventional aspects of language, the latter therefore washes his hands (...)
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  13.  49
    Claudia Bianchi (2001). Context of Utterance and Intended Context. Lecture Notes in Computer Science 2116:73-86.
    In this paper I expose and criticise the distinction between pure indexicals and demonstratives, held by David Kaplan and John Perry. I oppose the context of material production of the utterance to the “intended context” (the context of interpretation, i.e. the context the speaker indicates as semantically relevant): this opposition introduces an intentional feature into the interpretation of pure indexicals. As far as the indexical I is concerned, I maintain that we must distinguish between the material producer of the (...)
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  14.  27
    Dan López de Sa (2009). Relativizing Utterance-Truth? Synthese 170 (1):1-5.
    In recent years, some people have held that a radical relativist position is defensible in some philosophically interesting cases, including future contingents, predicates of personal taste, evaluative predicates in general, epistemic modals, and knowledge attributions. The position is frequently characterized as denying that utterance-truth is absolute. I argue that this characterization is inappropriate, as it requires a metaphysical substantive contention with which moderate views as such need not be committed. Before this, I also offer a more basic, admittedly less (...)
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  15.  28
    Robert J. Stainton (1997). Utterance Meaning and Syntactic Ellipsis. Pragmatics and Cognition 5 (1):51-78.
    Speakers often use ordinary words and phrases, unembedded in any sentence, to perform speech acts—or so it appears. In some cases appearances are deceptive: The seemingly lexical/phrasal utterance may really be an utterance of a syntactically eplliptical sentence. I argue however that, at least sometimes, plain old words and phrases are used on their own. The use of both words/phrases and elliptical sentences leads to two consequences: 1. Context must contribute more to utterance meaning than is often (...)
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  16.  35
    M. de Gaynesford (2013). Geoffrey Hill and Performative Utterance. British Journal of Aesthetics 53 (3):359-364.
    Utterance of a sentence in poetry can be performative, and explicitly so. The best-known of Geoffrey Hill’s critical essays denies this, but his own poetry demonstrates it. I clarify these claims and explain why they matter. What Hill denies illuminates anxieties about responsibility and commitment that poets and critics share with philosophers. What Hill demonstrates affords opportunities for mutual benefit between philosophy and criticism.
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  17.  18
    Jonathan Ginzburg & Shalom Lappin, Using Machine Learning for Non-Sentential Utterance Classification.
    In this paper we investigate the use of machine learning techniques to classify a wide range of non-sentential utterance types in dialogue, a necessary first step in the interpretation of such fragments. We train different learners on a set of contextual features that can be extracted from PoS information. Our results achieve an 87% weighted f-score—a 25% improvement over a simple rule-based algorithm baseline.
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  18.  9
    Petr Kot'átko (1998). Two Notions of Utterance Meaning. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 98 (3):225–239.
    Two alternatives are considered: (1) the notion of utterance meaning as constituted by the match between the communicative intention and interpretation, (2) the notion of utterance meaning as a set of the utterance's normative consequences. (1) is criticised for its being based on a notion of communicative success limited to a certain type of discourse. On the contrary, (2) allows for a variety of types of discourse governed by different principles of the determination of utterance meanings: (...)
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  19.  4
    A. Denkel (1983). The Meaning of an Utterance. Journal of Semantics 2 (1):29-40.
    The first target of the paper is to demonstrate that the Gricean explanation of the concept of an utterance's occasion meaning by proposing an equivalence between what a speaker means by X on an occasion and what X means on the same occasion cannot be correct. An outlineaccount of utterance meaning that carefully avoids explaining this concept purely in terms of the speaker's intentions or purely in terms of the hearer's understanding is then developed. It is concluded that (...)
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  20.  8
    Petr Kot'?Tko (1998). Two Notions of Utterance Meaning. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 98:225 - 239.
    Two alternatives are considered: (1) the notion of utterance meaning as constituted by the match between the communicative intention and interpretation, (2) the notion of utterance meaning as a set of the utterance's normative consequences. (1) is criticised for its being based on a notion of communicative success limited to a certain type of discourse. On the contrary, (2) allows for a variety of types of discourse governed by different principles of the determination of utterance meanings: (...)
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  21.  1
    Stefan Riegelnik, "Having Identified an Utterance..." - Predication and Interpretation.
    What is it for predicates to mean what they do and what is their contribution to the meaning of an utterance? It is exactly this question to which Davidson dedicates his book "Truth and Predication". Most commentators focus on Davidson's discussion of failed accounts, in particular of Frege's account. In contrast to this tendency, I focus here on Davidson's own account. The structure is as follows. First, I sketch the problem of predication and I glance at Davidson's discussion of (...)
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  22. Petr Kot’átko (1998). Two Notions of Utterance Meaning. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 98 (3):225-239.
    Two alternatives are considered: the notion of utterance meaning as constituted by the match between the communicative intention and interpretation, the notion of utterance meaning as a set of the utterance's normative consequences. is criticised for its being based on a notion of communicative success limited to a certain type of discourse. On the contrary, allows for a variety of types of discourse governed by different principles of the determination of utterance meanings: they differ in particular (...)
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  23.  71
    Andrew Peet (forthcoming). Epistemic Injustice in Utterance Interpretation. Synthese:1-23.
    This paper argues that underlying social biases are able to affect the processes underlying linguistic interpretation. The result is a series of harms systematically inflicted on marginalised speakers. It is also argued that the role of biases and stereotypes in interpretation complicates Miranda Fricker's proposed solution to epistemic injustice.
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  24.  72
    Stefano Predelli (1998). Utterance, Interpretation and the Logic of Indexicals. Mind and Language 13 (3):400–414.
  25.  2
    Pia Knoeferle & Matthew W. Crocker (2006). The Coordinated Interplay of Scene, Utterance, and World Knowledge: Evidence From Eye Tracking. Cognitive Science 30 (3):481-529.
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  26. Judith Butler (1997). Sovereign Performatives in the Contemporary Scene of Utterance. Critical Inquiry 23 (2):350.
  27.  52
    Philippe Schlenker (2004). Context of Thought and Context of Utterance: A Note on Free Indirect Discourse and the Historical Present. Mind and Language 19 (3):279–304.
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  28. Stacie Friend (2011). Fictive Utterance and Imagining II. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 85 (1):163-180.
    The currently standard approach to fiction is to define it in terms of imagination. I have argued elsewhere (Friend 2008) that no conception of imagining is sufficient to distinguish a response appropriate to fiction as opposed to non-fiction. In her contribution Kathleen Stock seeks to refute this objection by providing a more sophisticated account of the kind of propositional imagining prescribed by so-called ‘fictive utterances’. I argue that although Stock's proposal improves on other theories, it too fails to provide an (...)
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  29.  23
    David Davies (2015). Fictive Utterance and the Fictionality of Narratives and Works. British Journal of Aesthetics 55 (1):39-55.
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  30. Richard B. Arnaud (1976). Sentence, Utterance, and Samesayer. Noûs 10 (3):283-304.
  31.  3
    Ann Bunger, John C. Trueswell & Anna Papafragou (2012). The Relation Between Event Apprehension and Utterance Formulation in Children: Evidence From Linguistic Omissions. Cognition 122 (2):135-149.
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  32. David Spurrett & Stephen Cowley (2010). The Extended Infant: Utterance Activity and Distributed Cognition. In Richard Menary (ed.), The Extended Mind. MIT Press
  33.  3
    Robert E. Sanders (2015). A Tale of Two Intentions: Intending What an Utterance Means and Intending What an Utterance Achieves. Pragmatics and Society 6 (4):475-501.
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  34.  27
    Robert Grant (2001). Fiction, Meaning, and Utterance. Inquiry 44 (4):389 – 403.
    A Gricean preamble concludes that though utterances have unintended meanings, those cannot be considered apart from their intended meanings. Intention distinguishes artworks from natural phenomena. To allocate an artwork to a genre, to accept its normal authorial boundaries and that its content is not random but chosen, is to concede intention's centrality. Wimsatt and Beardsley were right that meaning is public. But they think 'intention' is 'private' or 'unavailable'. However, it too is public, in the work. Fictions are utterances of (...)
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  35. Stanley Cavell (2005). Passionate and Performative Utterance: Morals of an Encounter. In Stanley Cavell & Russell B. Goodman (eds.), Contending with Stanley Cavell. Oxford University Press 177--198.
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  36.  1
    Roy Turner (1976). Utterance Positioning as an Interactional Resource. Semiotica 17 (3).
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  37.  2
    Daniele Lorenzini (2015). Performative, Passionate, and Parrhesiastic Utterance: On Cavell, Foucault, and Truth as an Ethical Force. Critical Inquiry 41 (2):254-268.
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  38.  21
    Edward Karshner (2011). Thought, Utterance, Power: Toward a Rhetoric of Magic. Philosophy and Rhetoric 44 (1):52-71.
    Going back as far as the Old Kingdom, ancient Egyptian speculative thinkers had already developed a complex understanding of the relationship between personal agency, power, and the role of magic. What is more, these early philosophers saw that this world and the other operated according to the same principles. The rules by which one secured power were the same whether one was a peasant or a god. Through perception, the heart/mind would design an idea, the mouth would speak it and, (...)
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  39.  4
    Rosana Novaes Pinto (2013). The Aphasic Utterance: A Significal Perspective. Semiotica 2013 (196):457-472.
    Journal Name: Semiotica - Journal of the International Association for Semiotic Studies / Revue de l'Association Internationale de Sémiotique Volume: 2013 Issue: 196 Pages: 457-472.
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  40.  18
    Peter Harder (2003). The Status of Linguistic Facts: Rethinking the Relation Between Cognition, Social Institution and Utterance From a Functional Point of View. Mind and Language 18 (1):52–76.
  41.  21
    Vincent Colapietro (2003). Bebop as Historical Actuality, Urban Aesthetic, and Critical Utterance. Philosophy and Geography 6 (2):153 – 165.
    This paper focuses upon "bebop" as a distinctively urban movement for the purpose of contributing to the articulation of a distinctively urban aesthetics. The author examines both how the music was taken up in such cities as New York, Los Angeles, Kansas City, St. Louis, and Chicago, and in turn how an urban sensibility was expressed in this particular movement.
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  42.  6
    Miguel Ruiz Stull (2011). Formula. A Bergsonian approach to utterance's conditions. Trans/Form/Ação 34 (1):131-148.
    Tomada desde Artaud por Deleuze ya desde la redacción de Lógica del sentido (1969), la expresión de cuerpo sin órganos (CsO) no deja de causar al menos perplejidad. En su enunciación se traman puntos cruciales de la filosofía de Deleuze desde su teoría del acontecimiento y de la diferencia, pasando por una definición y una analítica del deseo, hasta una determinada noción de vida que articularía el proceso de su generación. Sin desestimar lo anterior y los profusos usos y determinaciones (...)
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  43. Adam Gonya (2011). Assertion and Receptivity: Schopenhauer, Nietzsche, and the Poet's Redemptive Utterance. Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 41 (2):193-209.
  44.  3
    Uνο Hölscher (1994). 10. Paradox, Simile, and Gnomic Utterance in Heraclitus. In Alexander P. D. Mourelatos (ed.), The Pre-Socratics: A Collection of Critical Essays. Princeton University Press 229-238.
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  45.  3
    Roger Gallie (1977). My Last Utterance. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 78:19 - 29.
  46.  12
    Geling Shang (2002). Embracing Differences and Many: The Signification of One in Zhuangzi's Utterance of Dao. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 1 (2):229-250.
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  47.  15
    Keiji Nishitani (1981). Ontology and Utterance. Philosophy East and West 31 (1):29-43.
  48.  14
    Stephen J. Cowley (2004). Early Hominins, Utterance-Activity, and Niche Construction. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (4):509-510.
    Falk's argument takes for granted that “protolanguage” used a genetic propensity for producing word-forms. Using developmental evidence, I dispute this assumption and, instead, reframe the argument in terms of behavioral ecology. Viewed as niche-construction, putting the baby down can help clarify not only the origins of talk but also the capacity to modify what we are saying as we speak.
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  49.  2
    Gilberto de Castro (2012). Toward a History of Forms of Utterance in Language Constructions (Study in the Applications of the Sociological Method to Problems of Syntax); Discourse in Life and Discourse in Art-Concerning Sociological Poetics. Bakhtiniana 7 (1):270 - 275.
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  50.  1
    Rosana Novaes Pinto (2013). The Aphasic Utterance: A Significal Perspective. Semiotica 2013 (196):457-472.
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