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  1. Simon Palmer & Uwe Mattler (2013). Masked Stimuli Modulate Endogenous Shifts of Spatial Attention. Consciousness and Cognition 22 (2):486-503.
    Unconscious stimuli can influence participants’ motor behavior but also more complex mental processes. Recent research has gradually extended the limits of effects of unconscious stimuli. One field of research where such limits have been proposed is spatial cueing, where exogenous automatic shifts of attention have been distinguished from endogenous controlled processes which govern voluntary shifts of attention. Previous evidence suggests unconscious effects on mechanisms of exogenous shifts of attention. Here, we applied a cue-priming paradigm to a spatial cueing task with (...)
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  2. Simon Palmer & Uwe Mattler (2013). On the Source and Scope of Priming Effects of Masked Stimuli on Endogenous Shifts of Spatial Attention. Consciousness and Cognition 22 (2):528-544.
    Unconscious stimuli can influence participants’ motor behavior as well as more complex mental processes. Previous cue-priming experiments demonstrated that masked cues can modulate endogenous shifts of spatial attention as measured by choice reaction time tasks. Here, we applied a signal detection task with masked luminance targets to determine the source and the scope of effects of masked stimuli. Target-detection performance was modulated by prime-cue congruency, indicating that prime-cue congruency modulates signal enhancement at early levels of target processing. These effects, however, (...)
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  3. Thorsten Albrecht & Uwe Mattler (2012). Individual Differences in Metacontrast Masking Regarding Sensitivity and Response Bias. Consciousness and Cognition 21 (3):1222-1231.
    In metacontrast masking target visibility is modulated by the time until a masking stimulus appears. The effect of this temporal delay differs across participants in such a way that individual human observers’ performance shows distinguishable types of masking functions which remain largely unchanged for months. Here we examined whether individual differences in masking functions depend on different response criteria in addition to differences in discrimination sensitivity. To this end we reanalyzed previously published data and conducted a new experiment for further (...)
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  4. Daniel Krüger & Uwe Mattler (2012). Inverse Cue Priming is Not Limited to Masks with Relevant Features. Consciousness and Cognition 21 (3):1207-1221.
    Apart from positive priming effects, masked prime stimuli can impair responses to a subsequent target stimulus which shares response-critical features in contrast to a target assigned to the opposite response. This counterintuitive phenomenon is called inverse priming . Here we examine the generality of this phenomenon beyond priming of motor responses. We used a non-motor cue-priming paradigm to study the underlying mechanism of inverse priming for relevant features masks which include task-relevant stimulus features and for irrelevant masks which omit task-relevant (...)
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  5. Uwe Mattler & Simon Palmer (2012). Time Course of Free-Choice Priming Effects Explained by a Simple Accumulator Model. Cognition 123 (3):347-360.
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  6. Susan Klapötke, Daniel Krüger & Uwe Mattler (2011). A PRP-Study to Determine the Locus of Target Priming Effects. Consciousness and Cognition 20 (3):882-900.
    Visual stimuli that are made invisible by a following mask can nonetheless affect motor responses. To localize the origin of these target priming effects we used the psychological refractory period paradigm. Participants classified tones as high or low, and responded to the position of a visual target that was preceded by a prime. The stimulus onset asynchrony between both tasks varied. In Experiment 1 the tone task was followed by the position task and SOA dependent target priming effects were observed. (...)
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  7. Daniel Krüger, Susan Klapötke & Uwe Mattler (2011). PRP-Paradigm Provides Evidence for a Perceptual Origin of the Negative Compatibility Effect. Consciousness and Cognition 20 (3):866-881.
    Visual stimuli that are made invisible by masking can affect motor responses to a subsequent target stimulus. When a prime is followed by a mask which is followed by a target stimulus, an inverse priming effect has been found: Responses are slow and frequently incorrect when prime and target stimuli are congruent, but fast and accurate when prime and target stimuli are incongruent. To functionally localize the origins of inverse priming effects, we applied the psychological refractory period paradigm which distinguishes (...)
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  8. Thorsten Albrecht, Susan Klapötke & Uwe Mattler (2010). Individual Differences in Metacontrast Masking Are Enhanced by Perceptual Learning. Consciousness and Cognition 19 (2):656-666.
    In vision research metacontrast masking is a widely used technique to reduce the visibility of a stimulus. Typically, studies attempt to reveal general principles that apply to a large majority of participants and tend to omit possible individual differences. The neural plasticity of the visual system, however, entails the potential capability for individual differences in the way observers perform perceptual tasks. We report a case of perceptual learning in a metacontrast masking task that leads to the enhancement of two types (...)
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  9. Thorsten Albrecht & Uwe Mattler (2010). Individual Differences in Metacontrast Masking: A Call for Caution When Interpreting Group Data☆. Consciousness and Cognition 19 (2):672-673.
    In this issue of Consciousness and Cognition, Bachmann comments on our study , which revealed two groups of observers with qualitative individual differences in metacontrast masking that are enhanced by perceptual learning. We are pleased that our study receives this attention and even more about Bachmann’s extremely positive comments. In this invited reply we argue that observers seem to be similar only at the beginning of the experiment but they have no choice as to which group to join. Findings strongly (...)
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  10. Uwe Mattler & Robert Fendrich (2010). Consciousness Mediated by Neural Transition States: How Invisibly Rapid Motions Can Become Visible. Consciousness and Cognition 19 (1):172-185.
    When observers view a rapidly moving stimulus they may see only a static streak. We report that there can be a transient percept of motion if such a moving stimulus is preceded or followed by a stationary image of that stimulus. A ring of dots was rotated so rapidly observers only saw a continuous outline circle and could not report its rotation direction. When an objectively stationary ring of dots preceded or followed this rotating ring, the stationary ring appeared to (...)
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  11. Dirk Vorberg, Uwe Mattler, Armin Heinecke, Thomas Schmidt & Jens Schwarzbach (2004). Invariant Time-Course of Priming with and Without Awareness. In Christian Kaernbach, Erich Schroger & Hermann Müller (eds.), Psychophysics Beyond Sensation: Laws and Invariants of Human Cognition. Psychology Press.