Search results for 'Vacuum' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Benni Reznik (2003). Entanglement From the Vacuum. Foundations of Physics 33 (1):167-176.score: 18.0
    We explore the entanglement of the vacuum of a relativistic field by letting a pair of causally disconnected probes interact with the field. We find that, even when the probes are initially non-entangled, they can wind up to a final entangled state. This shows that entanglement persists between disconnected regions in the vacuum. However the probe entanglement, unlike correlations, vanishes once the regions become sufficiently separated. The relation between entropy, correlations and entanglement is discussed.
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  2. L. Boi (2011). The Quantum Vacuum: A Scientific and Philosophical Concept, From Electrodynamics to String Theory and the Geometry of the Microscopic World. Johns Hopkins University Press.score: 18.0
    Acclaimed mathematical physicist and natural philosopher Luciano Boi expounds the quantum vacuum, exploring the meaning of nothingness and its relationship with ...
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  3. Simon Saunders & Harvey R. Brown (eds.) (1991). The Philosophy of Vacuum. Oxford University Press.score: 18.0
    The vacuum is fast emerging as the central structure of modern physics. This collection brings together philosophically-minded specialists who engage these issues in the context of classical gravity, quantum electrodynamics, and the grand unification program. The vacuum emerges as the synthesis of concepts of space, time, and matter; in the context of relativity and the quantum this new synthesis represents a structure of the most intricate and novel complexity. This book is a work in modern metaphysics, in which (...)
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  4. Mario Bacelar Valente (2011). A Case for an Empirically Demonstrable Notion of the Vacuum in Quantum Electrodynamics Independent of Dynamical Fluctuations. Journal for General Philosophy of Science 42 (2):241-261.score: 18.0
    A re-evaluation of the notion of vacuum in quantum electrodynamics is presented, focusing on the vacuum of the quantized electromagnetic field. In contrast to the ‘nothingness’ associated to the idea of classical vacuum, subtle aspects are found in relation to the vacuum of the quantized electromagnetic field both at theoretical and experimental levels. These are not the usually called vacuum effects. The view defended here is that the so-called vacuum effects are not due to (...)
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  5. H. E. Puthoff (2002). Polarizable-Vacuum (PV) Approach to General Relativity. Foundations of Physics 32 (6):927-943.score: 18.0
    Standard pedagogy treats topics in general relativity (GR) in terms of tensor formulations in curved space-time. An alternative approach based on treating the vacuum as a polarizable medium is presented here. The polarizable vacuum (PV) approach to GR, derived from a model by Dicke and related to the “THεμ” formalism used in comparative studies of gravitational theories, provides additional insight into what is meant by a curved metric. While reproducing the results predicted by GR for standard (weak-field) astrophysical (...)
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  6. Durmuş A. Demir (2009). Vacuum Energy as the Origin of the Gravitational Constant. Foundations of Physics 39 (12):1407-1425.score: 18.0
    We develop a geometro-dynamical approach to the cosmological constant problem (CCP) by invoking a geometry induced by the energy-momentum tensor of vacuum, matter and radiation. The construction, which utilizes the dual role of the metric tensor that it structures both the spacetime manifold and energy-momentum tensor of the vacuum, gives rise to a framework in which the vacuum energy induced by matter and radiation, instead of gravitating, facilitates the generation of the gravitational constant. The non-vacuum sources (...)
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  7. Jan M. Greben (2010). The Role of Energy Conservation and Vacuum Energy in the Evolution of the Universe. Foundations of Science 15 (2):153-176.score: 18.0
    We discuss a new theory of the universe in which the vacuum energy is of classical origin and dominates the energy content of the universe. As usual, the Einstein equations determine the metric of the universe. However, the scale factor is controlled by total energy conservation in contrast to the practice in the Robertson–Walker formulation. This theory naturally leads to an explanation for the Big Bang and is not plagued by the horizon and cosmological constant problem. It naturally accommodates (...)
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  8. Jean E. Burns (2007). Vacuum Radiation, Entropy, and Molecular Chaos. Foundations of Physics 37 (12):1727-1737.score: 18.0
    Vacuum radiation causes a particle to make a random walk about its dynamical trajectory. In this random walk the root mean square change in spatial coordinate is proportional to t 1/2, and the fractional changes in momentum and energy are proportional to t −1/2, where t is time. Thus the exchange of energy and momentum between a particle and the vacuum tends to zero over time. At the end of a mean free path the fractional change in momentum (...)
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  9. G. Jordan Maclay & Robert L. Forward (2004). A Gedanken Spacecraft That Operates Using the Quantum Vacuum (Dynamic Casimir Effect). Foundations of Physics 34 (3):477-500.score: 18.0
    Conventional rockets are not a suitable technology for interstellar missions. Chemical rockets require a very large weight of propellant, travel very slowly compared to light speed, and require significant energy to maintain operation over periods of years. For example, the 722 kg Voyager spacecraft required 13,600 kg of propellant to launch and would take about 80,000 years to reach the nearest star, Proxima Centauri, about 4.3 light years away. There have been various attempts at developing ideas on which one might (...)
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  10. Carlos Castro (2010). On Nonlinear Quantum Mechanics, Noncommutative Phase Spaces, Fractal-Scale Calculus and Vacuum Energy. Foundations of Physics 40 (11):1712-1730.score: 18.0
    A (to our knowledge) novel Generalized Nonlinear Schrödinger equation based on the modifications of Nottale-Cresson’s fractal-scale calculus and resulting from the noncommutativity of the phase space coordinates is explicitly derived. The modifications to the ground state energy of a harmonic oscillator yields the observed value of the vacuum energy density. In the concluding remarks we discuss how nonlinear and nonlocal QM wave equations arise naturally from this fractal-scale calculus formalism which may have a key role in the final formulation (...)
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  11. G. E. Volovik (2003). What Can the Quantum Liquid Say on the Brane Black Hole, the Entropy of an Extremal Black Hole, and the Vacuum Energy? Foundations of Physics 33 (2):349-368.score: 18.0
    Using quantum liquids one can simulate the behavior of the quantum vacuum in the presence of the event horizon. The condensed matter analogs demonstrate that in most cases the quantum vacuum resists formation of the horizon, and even if the horizon is formed different types of the vacuum instability develop, which are faster than the process of Hawking radiation. Nevertheless, it is possible to create the horizon on the quantum-liquid analog of the brane, where the vacuum (...)
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  12. Edward Grant (1981). Much Ado About Nothing: Theories of Space and Vacuum From the Middle Ages to the Scientific Revolution. Cambridge University Press.score: 15.0
    The primary objective of this study is to provide a description of the major ideas about void space within and beyond the world that were formulated between the fourteenth and early eighteenth centuries. The second part of the book - on infinite, extracosmic void space - is of special significance. The significance of Professor Grant's account is twofold: it provides the first comprehensive and detailed description of the scholastic Aristotelian arguments for and against the existence of void space; and it (...)
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  13. W. R. Miles (1939). Performance of the Einthoven Galvanometer with Input Through a Vacuum Tube Microvoltmeter. Journal of Experimental Psychology 25 (1):76.score: 15.0
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  14. Michael Redhead (1994). The Vacuum in Relativistic Quantum Field Theory. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1994:77 - 87.score: 12.0
    The status of the vacuum in relativistic quantum field theory is examined. A sharp distinction arises between the global vacuum and the local vacuum. The concept of local number density is critically assessed. The global vacuum state implies fluctuations for all local observables. Correlations between such fluctuations in space-like separated regions of space-time are discussed and the existence of correlations which are maximal in a certain sense is remarked on, independently of how far apart those regions (...)
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  15. Richard Healey (2010). Gauge Symmetry and the Theta Vacuum. In Mauricio Suarez, Mauro Dorato & Miklos Redei (eds.), EPSA Philosophical Issues in the Sciences. Springer. 105--116.score: 12.0
    According to conventional wisdom, local gauge symmetry is not a symmetry of nature, but an artifact of how our theories represent nature. But a study of the so-called theta-vacuum appears to refute this view. The ground state of a quantized non-Abelian Yang-Mills gauge theory is characterized by a real-valued, dimensionless parameter theta—a fundamental new constant of nature. The structure of this vacuum state is often said to arise from a degeneracy of the vacuum of the corresponding classical (...)
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  16. York Dobyns, Alfonso Rueda & Bernard Haisch (2000). The Case for Inertia as a Vacuum Effect: A Reply to Woodward and Mahood. [REVIEW] Foundations of Physics 30 (1):59-80.score: 12.0
    The possibility of an extrinsic origin for inertial reaction forces has recently seen increased attention in the physical literature. Among theories of extrinsic inertia, the two considered by the current work are (1) the hypothesis that inertia is a result of gravitational interactions and (2) the hypothesis that inertial reaction forces arise from the interaction of material particles with local fluctuations of the quantum vacuum. A recent article supporting the former and criticizing the latter is shown to contain substantial (...)
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  17. Jean E. Burns (1998). Entropy and Vacuum Radiation. Foundations of Physics 28 (7):1191-1207.score: 12.0
    It is shown that entropy increase in thermodynamic systems can plausibly be accounted for by the random action of vacuum radiation. A recent calculation by Rueda using stochastic electrodynamics (SED) shows that vacuum radiation causes a particle to undergo a rapid Brownian motion about its average dynamical trajectory. It is shown that the magnitude of spatial drift calculated by Rueda can also be predicted by assuming that the average magnitudes of random shifts in position and momentum of a (...)
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  18. K. P. Sinha, C. Sivaram & E. C. G. Sudarshan (1976). The Superfluid Vacuum State, Time-Varying Cosmological Constant, and Nonsingular Cosmological Models. Foundations of Physics 6 (6):717-726.score: 12.0
    Some cosmological consequences of the superfluid vacuum state developed previously by the authors are discussed, particularly with regard to the initial stages of the universe. The transition temperature of the hadronic superfluid (superfluid during the hadron era) is estimated to be 10 13 K, which is the same as the Hagedorn temperature, giving a physical basis of the thermodynamic bootstrap model.
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  19. Stephan Hartmann (2001). Vacuum. In H. Gründer (ed.), Historisches Wörterbuch der Philosophie. Schwabe.score: 12.0
    Vacuum (leer, frei) bezeichnete bis zum 19. Jahrhundert allein den körperlosen Raum. Unter dem Einfluss physikalischer (Feld-) Theorien meint der Terminus inzwischen diejenige residuale physische Entiät, die einen vorgegebenen Raum ausfüllt bzw. im Prinzip ausfüllen würde, nachdem alles, was mit physikalischen Mitteln entfernt werden kann, aus dem Raum entfernt wurde. Theorien über das V. sind daher eng mit Theorien über die Struktur des Raumes, die Bewegung, die physikalischen Gegenstände und deren Wechselwirkungen verbunden. In der Quantentheorie bezeichnet V. den Zustand (...)
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  20. I. Açikgöz & N. Ünal (1998). Vacuum Polarization in Self-Field Quantum Electrodynamics. Foundations of Physics 28 (5):815-828.score: 12.0
    We have evaluated analytically the vacuum polarization in a Coulomb field using the relativistic Dirac-Coulomb wave functions by a new method. The result is made finite by an appropriate choice of contour integrations and gives the standard result in the lowest order of iteration. We used the formalism of self-field quantum electrodynamics in the evaluation of the vacuum polarization which needs neither field quantization nor renormalization. There are no infrared or ultraviolet divergences.
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  21. Timothy H. Boyer (2013). Contrasting Classical and Quantum Vacuum States in Non-Inertial Frames. Foundations of Physics 43 (8):923-947.score: 12.0
    Classical electron theory with classical electromagnetic zero-point radiation (stochastic electrodynamics) is the classical theory which most closely approximates quantum electrodynamics. Indeed, in inertial frames, there is a general connection between classical field theories with classical zero-point radiation and quantum field theories. However, this connection does not extend to noninertial frames where the time parameter is not a geodesic coordinate. Quantum field theory applies the canonical quantization procedure (depending on the local time coordinate) to a mirror-walled box, and, in general, each (...)
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  22. H. Heintzmann (1989). Third Quantization: The Problem of the Cosmic Vacuum, Spontaneous Symmetry Breaking, and the Possibility of an Eternal Universe. [REVIEW] Foundations of Physics 19 (9):1113-1120.score: 12.0
    The existence of a fundamental length in general relativity, the Planck length, may lead to a breakdown of Lorentz invariance of the vacuum. The third quantization introduces renormalization fields of negative energy which do not interact with matter however. This revision leads to a measurable modification of the Casimir effect and can, at least in principle, lead to an eternal universe.
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  23. Carlos Castro (2007). On Dark Energy, Weyl's Geometry, Different Derivations of the Vacuum Energy Density and the Pioneer Anomaly. Foundations of Physics 37 (3):366-409.score: 12.0
    Two different derivations of the observed vacuum energy density are presented. One is based on a class of proper and novel generalizations of the (Anti) de Sitter solutions in terms of a family of radial functions R(r) that provides an explicit formula for the cosmological constant along with a natural explanation of the ultraviolet/infrared (UV/IR) entanglement required to solve this problem. A nonvanishing value of the vacuum energy density of the order of ${10^{- 123} M_{\rm Planck}^4}$ is derived (...)
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  24. Paul Davies, Quantum Vacuum Noise in Physics and Cosmology.score: 12.0
    The concept of the vacuum in quantum field theory is a subtle one. Vacuum states have a rich and complex set of properties that produce distinctive, though usually exceedingly small, physical effects. Quantum vacuum noise is familiar in optical and electronic devices, but in this paper I wish to consider extending the discussion to systems in which gravitation, or large accelerations, are important. This leads to the prediction of vacuum friction: The quantum vacuum can act (...)
     
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  25. M. Barone (2004). The Vacuum as Ether in the Last Century. Foundations of Physics 34 (12):1973-1982.score: 12.0
    In this paper we review the evolution of the concept of “vacuum” according to different theories formulated in the last century, like Quantum Mechanics, Quantum Electrodynamics, Quantum Chromodynamics in Particle Physics and Cosmology. In all these theories a metastable vacuum state is considered which transforms from one state to another according to the energy taken into consideration. It is a “fluid” made up by matter and radiation present in the whole Universe, which may be identified with a modern (...)
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  26. Paul Davies, Detecting the Rotating Quantum Vacuum.score: 12.0
    We derive conditions for rotating particle detectors to respond in a variety of bounded spacetimes and compare the results with the folklore that particle detectors do not respond in the vacuum state appropriate to their motion. Applications involving possible violations of the second law of thermodynamics are briefly addressed.
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  27. Victor Elias, Kevin B. Sprague & Ying Xue (2000). Vacuum Condensates and the Anomalous Magnetic Moment of a Dirac Fermion. Foundations of Physics 30 (3):439-461.score: 12.0
    We address anticipated fermion–antifermion and dimension-4 gauge-field vacuum-condensate contributions to the magnetic portion of the fermion–photon vertex function in the presence of a vacuum with nonperturbative content, such as that of QCD. We discuss how inclusion of such condensate contributions may lead to a vanishing anomalous magnetic moment, in which case vacuum condensates may account for the apparent consistency between constituent quark masses characterizing baryon magnetic moments and those characterizing baryon spectroscopy.
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  28. E. S. & H. Zinkernagel (2002). The Quantum Vacuum and the Cosmological Constant Problem. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 33 (4):663-705.score: 12.0
    The cosmological constant problem arises at the intersection between general relativity and quantum field theory, and is regarded as a fundamental problem in modern physics. In this paper, we describe the historical and conceptual origin of the cosmological constant problem which is intimately connected to the vacuum concept in quantum field theory. We critically discuss how the problem rests on the notion of physically real vacuum energy, and which relations between general relativity and quantum field theory are assumed (...)
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  29. David Z. Albert (1988). On the Possibility That the Present Quantum State of the Universe is the Vacuum. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1988:127 - 133.score: 12.0
    It is inquired how much an observer can ascertain of the quantum state of a system of which he and his measuring apparatus form a part; how much, for example, observers like ourselves can ascertain of the quantum state of the Universe. It turns out that no practicable experiment (and: perhaps, no experiment whatever) can establish that that state is not the vacuum. Some of the implications of this curious result are discussed.
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  30. Alfonso Rueda & Bernhard Haisch (1998). Contribution to Inertial Mass by Reaction of the Vacuum to Accelerated Motion. Foundations of Physics 28 (7):1057-1108.score: 12.0
    We present an approach to understanding the origin of inertia involving the electromagnetic component of the quantum vacuum and propose this as a step toward an alternative to Mach's principle. Preliminary analysis of the momentum flux of the classical electromagnetic zero-point radiation impinging on accelerated objects as viewed by an inertial observer suggests that the resistance to acceleration attributed to inertia may be at least in part a force of opposition originating in the vacuum. This analysis avoids the (...)
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  31. Carl E. Carlson & Ian J. Swanson (2000). Casimir Energy in Astrophysics: Gamma-Ray Bursts From QED Vacuum Transitions. [REVIEW] Foundations of Physics 30 (5):775-783.score: 12.0
    Motivated by analogous applications to sonoluminescence, neutron stars mergers are examined in the context of Schwinger's dynamical Casimir effect. When the dielectric properties of the QED vacuum are altered through the introduction of dense matter, energy shifts in the zero-point fluctuations can appear as photon bursts at gamma-ray frequencies. The amount of radiation depends upon the properties and amount of matter in motion and the suddenness of the transition. It is shown that the dynamical Casimir effect can convert sufficient (...)
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  32. Paul Davies, Quantum Vacuum Friction.score: 12.0
    The quantum vacuum may in certain circumstances be regarded as a type of fluid medium, or aether, exhibiting energy density, pressure, stress and friction. Vacuum friction may be thought of as being responsible for the spontaneous creation of particles from the vacuum state when the system is non-stationary. Examples include the expanding universe, rotating black holes, moving mirrors, atoms passing close to surfaces, and the activities of sub-cellular biosystems. The concept of vacuum friction will be reviewed (...)
     
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  33. Stefan Lukits (2011). Narrativity and the Symbolic Vacuum. Philosophy and Theology 23 (1):167-183.score: 12.0
    “Narrativity and the Symbolic Vacuum” examines the descriptive and the prescriptive narrativity claim in the context of a claim that there are narratives in the biblical literature that resist both. The descriptive narrativity claim maintains that it is not an option for a person to conceive of their life without narrative coherence. The prescriptive claim holds that narrativity is a necessary condition for a good and successful human life. Phenomenological thought and Aristotelian virtue ethics, expressing a critical stance towards (...)
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  34. F. Antonuccio, S. Pinsky & S. Tsujimaru (2000). A Comment on the Light-Cone Vacuum in 1+1 Dimensional Super-Yang–Mills Theory. Foundations of Physics 30 (3):475-486.score: 12.0
    The discrete light-cone quantization (DLCQ) of a supersymmetric gauge theory in 1+1 dimensions is discussed, with particular attention given to the inclusion of the gauge zero mode. Interestingly, the notorious “zero-mode” problem is now tractable because of special supersymmetric cancellations. In particular, we show that anomalous zero-mode contributions to the currents are absent, in contrast to what is observed in the nonsupersymmetric case. An analysis of the vacuum structure is provided by deriving the effective quantum mechanical Hamiltonian of the (...)
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  35. Andreas Blank (2008). Julius Caesar Scaliger on Corpuscles and the Vacuum. Perspectives on Science 16 (2):pp. 137-159.score: 12.0
    This paper investigates the relationship between some corpuscularian and Aristotelian strands that run through the thought of the sixteenth-century philosopher and physician Julius Caesar Scaliger. Scaliger often uses the concepts of corpuscles, pores, and vacuum. At the same time, he also describes mixture as involving the fusion of particles into a continuous body. The paper explores how Scaliger’s combination of corpuscularian and non-corpuscularian views is shaped, in substantial aspects, by his response to the views on corpuscles and the (...) in the work of his contemporary, Girolamo Fracastoro. Fracastoro frequently appears in Scaliger’s work as an opponent against whom numerous objections are directed. However, if one follows up Scaliger’s references, it soon becomes clear that Scaliger also shares some of Fracastoro’s views. Like Scaliger, Fracastoro suggests corpuscularian explanations of phenomena such as water rising in lime while at the same time ascribing some non-corpuscularian properties to his natural minima. Like Scaliger, Fracastoro maintains that there is no vacuum devoid of bodies since places cannot exist independently of bodies (although their opinions diverge regarding how exactly the relevant dependency relation might be explicated). Finally, like Scaliger, Fracastoro connects a continuum view of mixture with a theory of natural minima. (shrink)
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  36. E. S., H. Zinkernagel & Y. T. (1999). The Casimir Effect and the Interpretation of the Vacuum. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 30 (1):111-139.score: 12.0
    The Casimir force between two neutral metallic plates is often considered conclusive evidence for the reality of electromagnetic zero-point fluctuations in 'empty space' (i.e. in absence of any boundaries). However, it is not well known that the Casimir force can be derived from many different points of view. The purpose of this note is to supply a conceptually oriented introduction to a representative set of these different interpretations. The different accounts suggest that the Casimir effect reveals nothing conclusive about the (...)
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  37. M. D. Pollock (2012). On Vacuum Fluctuations and Particle Masses. Foundations of Physics 42 (10):1300-1328.score: 12.0
    The idea that the mass m of an elementary particle is explained in the semi-classical approximation by quantum-mechanical zero-point vacuum fluctuations has been applied previously to spin-1/2 fermions to yield a real and positive constant value for m, expressed through the spinorial connection Γ i in the curved-space Dirac equation for the wave function ψ due to Fock. This conjecture is extended here to bosonic particles of spin 0 and spin 1, starting from the basic assumption that all fundamental (...)
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  38. Miren Boehm (2012). Filling the Gaps in Hume's Vacuums. Hume Studies 38 (1):79-99.score: 12.0
    The paper addresses two difficulties that arise in Treatise 1.2.5. First, Hume appears to be inconsistent when he denies that we have an idea of a vacuum or empty space yet allows for the idea of an “invisible and intangible distance.” My solution to this difficulty is to develop the overlooked possibility that Hume does not take the invisible and intangible distance to be a distance at all. Second, although Hume denies that we have an idea of a (...), some texts in Treatise 1.2.5 are taken by interpreters to suggest that Hume nonetheless believes that there are vacuums in nature. I discuss the relevant texts and defend the view that Hume does not in fact countenance belief in vacuums. I conclude by outlining an interpretation of Hume’s intention in the Treatise that allows us to understand his discussion of ideas as having implications for the sciences. (shrink)
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  39. M. W. Evans (1995). The Charge Quantization Condition inO(3) Vacuum Electrodynamics. Foundations of Physics 25 (1):175-181.score: 12.0
    The existence of the longitudinal field B (3) in the vacuum implies that the gauge group of electrodynamics is O(3),and not U(1) [or O(2)].This results directly in the charge quantization condition e=h(ϰ/A (0)).This condition is derived independently in this paper from the relativistic motion of one electron in the field and is shown to he that in which the electron travels infinitesimally close to the speed of light.
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  40. A. J. Faria, H. M. França, G. G. Gomes & R. C. Sponchiado (2007). The Vacuum Electromagnetic Fields and the Schrödinger Equation. Foundations of Physics 37 (8):1296-1305.score: 12.0
    We consider the simple case of a nonrelativistic charged harmonic oscillator in one dimension, to investigate how to take into account the radiation reaction and vacuum fluctuation forces within the Schrödinger equation. The effects of both zero-point and thermal classical electromagnetic vacuum fields, characteristic of stochastic electrodynamics, are separately considered. Our study confirms that the zero-point electromagnetic fluctuations are dynamically related to the momentum operator p=−i ℏ ∂/∂ x used in the Schrödinger equation.
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  41. Jean-Yves Grandpeix & François Lurçat (2002). Particle Description of Zero-Energy Vacuum I: Virtual Particles. [REVIEW] Foundations of Physics 32 (1):109-131.score: 12.0
    First the “frame problem” is sketched: The motion of an isolated particle obeys a simple law in Galilean frames, but how does the Galilean character of the frame manifest itself at the place of the particle? A description of vacuum as a system of virtual particles will help to answer this question. For future application to such a description, the notion of global particle is defined and studied. To this end, a systematic use of the Fourier transformation on the (...)
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  42. V. A. De Lorenci & N. F. Svaiter (1999). A Rotating Quantum Vacuum. Foundations of Physics 29 (8):1233-1264.score: 12.0
    We investigate how a uniformly rotating frame is defined as the rest frame of an observer rotating with constant angular velocity Ω around the z axis of an inertial frame. Assuming this frame to be a Lorentz one, we second quantize a free massless scalar field in the rotating frame and obtain that creation-annihilation operators of the field are not the same as those of an inertial frame. This leads to a new vacuum state—a rotating vacuum. After this, (...)
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  43. Kunio Fujiwara (1980). Is the Light Velocity in Vacuum Really a Constant? Possible Breakdown of the Linear Ω-K Relation at Extremely High Frequencies. Foundations of Physics 10 (3-4):309-331.score: 12.0
    We investigate the novel problem of what happens in special relativity and in relativistic field theories whenthree-dimensional space is quantized. First we examine the equation for elastic waves on a linear chain, the simplest example of a quantized medium, and propose, on its analogy, a nonlinearp-k relationp=ħk(sinhkl)/kl for light and material waves. Here,kl is a new variable which represents the space-quantization effect on the plane wave of wave numberk=|k|. (Note thatkl=0 givesp=ħk.) This relation makes the light velocity in vacuum (...)
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  44. Gilad Gour & L. Sriramkumar (1999). Will Small Particles Exhibit Brownian Motion in the Quantum Vacuum? Foundations of Physics 29 (12):1917-1949.score: 12.0
    The Brownian motion of small particles interacting with a field at a finite temperature is a well-known and well-understood phenomenon. At zero temperature, even though the thermal fluctuations are absent, quantum fields still possess vacuum fluctuations. It is then interesting to ask whether a small particle that is interacting with a quantum field will exhibit Brownian motion when the quantum field is assumed to be in the vacuum state. In this paper, we study the cases of a small (...)
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  45. F. Coester & W. Polyzou (1994). Vacuum Structures in Hamiltonian Light-Front Dynamics. Foundations of Physics 24 (3):387-400.score: 12.0
    Hamiltonian light-front dynamics of quantum fields may provide a useful approach to systematic nonperturbative approximations to quantum field theories. We investigate inequivalent Hilbert-space representations of the light-front field algebra in which the stability group of the light front is implemented by unitary transformations. The Hilbert space representation of states is generated by the operator algebra from the vacuum state. There is a large class of vacuum states besides the Fock vacuum which meet all the invariance requirements. The (...)
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  46. Jean-Yves Grandpeix & François Lurçat (2002). Particle Description of Zero-Energy Vacuum II: Basic Vacuum Systems. [REVIEW] Foundations of Physics 32 (1):133-158.score: 12.0
    We describe vacuum as a system of virtual particles, some of which have negative energies. Any system of vacuum particles is a part of a keneme, i.e., of a system of n particles which can, without violating the conservation laws, annihilate in the strict sense of the word (transform into nothing). A keneme is a homogeneous system, i.e., its state is invariant by all transformations of the invariance group. But a homogeneous system is not necessarily a keneme. In (...)
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  47. Vicente Sanfélix Vidarte (1995). Reductio Ad Vacuum. Anuario Filosófico 28 (2):311-334.score: 12.0
    Cartesianism was always a subject to Wittgenstein's criticism. In his case against it, he employed a general strategy that I have called "Reductio ad vacuum". There is something right in Cartesianism but without a hidden confusing premise, the truth of Cartesianism is empty. According to the early Wittgenstein, Cartesianism was right be-cause Solipsism is true: the Self is the center of the world. But without confusing this metaphysical Self with the psychological one, Solipsism becomes empty and no different from (...)
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  48. James F. Woodward (2001). Gravity, Inertia, and Quantum Vacuum Zero Point Fields. Foundations of Physics 31 (5):819-835.score: 12.0
    Over the past several years Haisch, Rueda, and others have made the claim that the origin of inertial reaction forces can be explained as the interaction of electrically charged elementary particles with the vacuum electromagnetic zero-point field expected on the basis of quantum field theory. After pointing out that this claim, in light of the fact that the inertial masses of the hadrons reside in the electrically chargeless, photon-like gluons that bind their constituent quarks, is untenable, the question of (...)
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  49. H. D. Zeh (1975). Symmetry-Breaking Vacuum and State Vector Reduction. Foundations of Physics 5 (2):371-373.score: 12.0
    It is argued by means of analogy with certain irreversible processes that a symmetry-violating vacuum need not necessarily be explained by a special cosmic initial condition.
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  50. I. J. R. Aitchison (1991). The Vacuum and Unification. In Simon Saunders & Harvey R. Brown (eds.), The Philosophy of Vacuum. Oxford University Press. 159--196.score: 12.0
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