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  1. Valerie Gray Hardcastle, The Binding Problem.
    It is important to separate the question of binding from the problem of consciousness. Undoubtedly, there are some close connections between the two: my conscious experience is of a bound unity. But my unconscious experiences -- subliminal impressions, masked primings, etc. -- might be bound too for all I know. Hence, some of the recent commentators speak too loosely when they talk of 40 Hz oscillations solving some problem of conscious perception.
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  2. Valerie Gray Hardcastle (forthcoming). Changing Perspectives of Motherhood: Images From the Aliens Trilogy. Film and Philosophy.
     
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  3. Valerie Gray Hardcastle (2014). Pleasure Gone Awry? A New Conceptualization of Chronic Pain and Addiction. Review of Philosophy and Psychology 5 (1):71-85.
    I examine what happens in the brain when patients experience chronic pain and when subjects are addicted to alcohol. We can find important parallels between these two cases, and these parallels can perhaps point us toward new ways of treating (or at least understanding) both issues. Interestingly, we can understand both cases as our pleasure system gone awry. In brief, I argue that chronic pain and alcohol addiction both stem from a dysregulation in our brain’s reward structure. This dysregulation in (...)
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  4. Valerie Gray Hardcastle (2014). The Rationality of Suicide Bombers: There is a Little Bit of Crazy in All of Us. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 37 (4):371-372.
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  5. Valerie Gray Hardcastle (2009). BetWeen Psychology anD neURoscIence. In John Symons Paco Calvo (ed.), The Routledge Companion to Philosophy of Psychology. Routledge.
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  6. Valerie Gray Hardcastle (2008). Ignorance and Imagination: The Epistemic Origin of the Problem of Consciousness - by Daniel Stoljar. [REVIEW] Philosophical Books 49 (3):274-275.
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  7. Valerie Gray Hardcastle (2008). Neither Necessary nor Sufficient for Addiction. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (4):447-448.
    Although Redish et al. have pulled together a large number of approaches to understanding decision-making and common errors in cognition, they have outlined neither the necessary nor the sufficient attributes of addiction. They are correct in claiming that addiction is multifaceted and probably more akin to a syndrome than a genuine disease. But grasping what that multifaceted syndrome is still eludes us.
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  8. Valerie Gray Hardcastle (2008). Review of Carl F. Craver, Explaining the Brain: Mechanisms and the Mosaic Unity of Neuroscience. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2008 (1).
  9. Valerie Gray Hardcastle & Rosalyn W. Stewart (2008). Reduction and Embodied Cognition : Perspectives From Medicine and Psychiatry. In Jakob Hohwy & Jesper Kallestrup (eds.), Being Reduced: New Essays on Reduction, Explanation, and Causation. Oxford University Press.
     
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  10. Andrew Garner & Valerie Hardcastle (2007). Neurobiological. In Jennifer Radden (ed.), The Philosophy of Psychiatry: A Companion. Oup Usa.
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  11. Valerie Gray Hardcastle (2007). Neurobiology. In David L. Hull & Michael Ruse (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to the Philosophy of Biology. Cambridge University Press.
  12. Valerie Gray Hardcastle & C. Matthew Stewart (2005). Localization in the Brain and Other Illusions. In Andrew Brook (ed.), Cognition and the Brain. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
     
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  13. Eric Dietrich & Valerie Gray Hardcastle (2004). Sisyphus's Boulder: Consciousness and the Limits of the Knowable. John Benjamins.
    In Sisyphus's Boulder, Eric Dietrich and Valerie Hardcastle argue that we will never get such a theory because consciousness has an essential property that...
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  14. Andrew Garnar & Valerie Gray Hardcastle (2004). Neurobiological Models: An Unnecessary Divide--Neural Models in Psychiatry. In Jennifer Radden (ed.), The Philosophy of Psychiatry: A Companion. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
     
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  15. Andrew Garnar & Valerie Gray Hardcastle (2004). The Philosophy of Psychiatry: A Companion. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
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  16. Valerie Gray Hardcastle (2004). Andrew Garnar Valerie Gray Hardcastle. In Jennifer Radden (ed.), The Philosophy of Psychiatry: A Companion. Oxford University Press.
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  17. Valerie Gray Hardcastle (2004). Getting to Grips with the Brain Problem. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 8 (8):339-340.
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  18. Valerie Gray Hardcastle (2004). HOT Theories of Consciousness: More Sad Tales of Philosophical Intuitions Gone Astray. In Rocco J. Gennaro (ed.), Higher-Order Theories of Consciousness: An Anthology. John Benjamins. 277.
  19. Valerie Gray Hardcastle (2004). Peer Commentary on Are There Neural Correlates of Consciousness: Situated Reductionism, or How to Be an Internalist and an Externalist at the Same Time. Journal of Consciousness Studies 11 (1):39-42.
  20. Valerie Gray Hardcastle (2004). Schizophrenia: A Benign Trait. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (6):859-860.
    While schizophrenia may be genetically determined up to a point, neither it nor its nearest relatives offer any sort of reproductive advantage to its sufferers. Instead, from an evolutionary point of view, schizophrenia is benign – it neither promotes nor inhibits survival to reproduction. Because it is benign, its rate of occurrence should remain fairly constant over time.
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  21. Valerie Gray Hardcastle (2004). Situated Reductionism, or How To Be an Internalist and an Externalist at the Same Time. Journal of Consciousness Studies 11 (1):39-41.
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  22. Valerie Gray Hardcastle (2004). The Elusive Illusion of Sensation. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (5):662-663.
    The sensation of will is not the same thing as the will itself any more than the sensation of hunger is the same thing as being devoid of nutrients. This is not a really surprising claim, but it is the only claim to which Wegner is entitled in his book.
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  23. Valerie Gray Hardcastle (2004). Thinking About Consciousness. [REVIEW] Philosophical Books 45 (3):223-227.
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  24. Valerie Gray Hardcastle & C. Matthew Stewart (2004). Neuroscience and the Art of Single-Cell Recordings. Biology and Philosophy 18 (1):195-208.
    This article examines how scientists move from physical measurementsto actual observation of single-cell recordings in the brain. We highlight how easy it is to change the fundamental nature of ourobservations using accepted methodological techniques for manipulatingraw data. Collecting single-cell data is thoroughly pragmatic. Weconclude that there is no deep or interesting difference betweenaccounting for observations by measurements and accounting forobservations by theories.
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  25. Valerie Gray Hardcastle (2003). Attention Versus Consciousness: A Distinction with a Difference. In Naoyuki Osaka (ed.), Neural Basis of Consciousness. John Benjamins. 105.
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  26. Valerie Gray Hardcastle (2003). Emotions and Narrative Selves. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 10 (4):353-356.
  27. Valerie Gray Hardcastle (2003). The Development of the Self. In Gary D. Fireman, T. E. McVay & Owen J. Flanagan (eds.), Narrative and Consciousness. Oxford University Press.
  28. Eric Dietrich & Valerie Gray Hardcastle (2002). A Connecticut Yalie in King Descartes' Court. Newsletter of Cognitive Science Society (Now Defunct).
    What is consciousness? Of course, each of us knows, privately, what consciousness is. And we each think, for basically irresistible reasons, that all other conscious humans by and large have experiences like ours. So we conclude that we all know what consciousness is. It's the felt experiences of our lives. But that is not the answer we, as cognitive scientists, seek in asking our question. We all want to know what physical process consciousness is and why it produces this very (...)
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  29. Valerie Gray Hardcastle (2002). On the Normativity of Functions. In Andre Ariew (ed.), Functions. Oxford University Press.
  30. Valerie Gray Hardcastle (2002). Science and the Riddle of Consciousness: A Solution Jeffrey Foss Boston, MA: Kluwer Academic Publishers, 2000, Xiii + 225 Pp., $99.50. [REVIEW] Dialogue 41 (01):206-.
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  31. Valerie Gray Hardcastle (2002). Science and the Riddle of Consciousness. Dialogue 41 (1):206-207.
     
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  32. Valerie Gray Hardcastle (2002). Top-Down Versus Bottom-Up is Not the Same Thing as Psychological Versus Biological. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (5):585-586.
    While there may be interesting theoretical differences between cortical and subcortical malfunctions, it is not a difference that is going to separate the psychological from the biological. For, the distinctions we draw between the “psychological” and “biological” turn on our assessments of others' conscious experiences, and not on anything deeper or more profound.
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  33. Valerie Gray Hardcastle & C. Matthew Stewart (2002). What Do Brain Data Really Show? Philosophy of Science 69 (3):572-582.
  34. Valerie Gray Hardcastle & Rosalyn Walker Stewart (2002). Supporting Irrational Suicide. Bioethics 16 (5):425–438.
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  35. Kelly A. Forrest, Craig Kunimoto, Jeff Miller, Harold Pashler, J. G. Taylor & Valerie Hardcastle (2001). Tomoka Takeuchi, Robert D. Ogilvie, Anthony V. Ferrelli, Timothy I. Murphy, and Kathy Belicki. Consciousness and Cognition 10:158.
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  36. Valerie Hardcastle (2001). The Nature of Pain. In William P. Bechtel, Pete Mandik, Jennifer Mundale & Robert S. Stufflebeam (eds.), Philosophy and the Neurosciences: A Reader. Blackwell. 295--311.
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  37. Valerie Gray Hardcastle (2001). Consciousness: Chili of the Brain. Consciousness and Cognition 10 (3):418-420.
  38. Valerie Gray Hardcastle (2001). Not Guilty as Charged. A Reply to Garfield. Metascience 10 (2):189-192.
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  39. Valerie Gray Hardcastle (2001). One Conciousness, Different Contents. Communication and Cognition. Monographies 34 (1-2):61-73.
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  40. Valerie Gray Hardcastle (2001). Visual Perception is Not Visual Awareness. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (5):985-985.
    O'Regan & Noë mistakenly identify visual processing with visual experience. I outline some reasons why this is a mistake, taking my data and arguments mainly from the literature on subliminal processing.
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  41. Valerie Gray Hardcastle & Eric Dietrich (2001). Toward a Book of Counter-Examples for Cognitive Science: Dynamic Systems Theory, Emotion, and Aardvarks. Danish Yearbook of Philosophy 36:35-48.
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  42. Valerie Gray Hardcastle & C. Matthew Stewart (2001). Theory Structure in Neuroscience. In Peter K. Machamer, Peter McLaughlin & Rick Grush (eds.), Theory and Method in the Neurosciences. University of Pittsburgh Press.
     
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  43. ValerieGray Hardcastle (2001). A View From Within. Critical Review of John Horgan's the Undiscovered Mind: How the Human Mind Defies Replication, Medication, and Explanation. [REVIEW] Brain and Mind 2 (2):239-242.
  44. John Bickle, Gillian Einstein & Valerie Hardcastle (2000). Editors' Introduction. Brain and Mind 1 (1):1-6.
  45. David J. Buller & Valerie Gray Hardcastle (2000). C. Richard Chapman, Yoshio Nakamura and Chris-Topher N. Chapman/Pain and Folk Theory 209–222 Don Gustafson/on the Supposed Utility of a Folk Theory of Pain 223–228 Kenneth J. Sufka/Searching for a Common Ground: A Commentary on Resnik's Folk Psychology of Pain 229–231. [REVIEW] Brain and Mind 1:409-411.
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  46. David J. Buller & Valerie Gray Hardcastle (2000). Evolutionary Psychology, Meet Developmental Neurobiology: Against Promiscuous Modularity. [REVIEW] Brain and Mind 1 (3):307-25.
    Evolutionary psychologists claim that the mind contains “hundreds or thousands” of “genetically specified” modules, which are evolutionary adaptations for their cognitive functions. We argue that, while the adult human mind/brain typically contains a degree of modularization, its “modules” are neither genetically specified nor evolutionary adaptations. Rather, they result from the brain’s developmental plasticity, which allows environmental task demands a large role in shaping the brain’s information-processing structures. The brain’s developmental plasticity is our fundamental psychological adaptation, and the “modules” that result (...)
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  47. Guven Guzeldere, Owen J. Flanagan & Valerie Gray Hardcastle (2000). The Nature and Function of Consciousness: Lessons From Blindsight. In Michael S. Gazzaniga (ed.), The New Cognitive Neurosciences: 2nd Edition. Mit Press.
  48. Valerie Gray Hardcastle (2000). Hard Things Made Hard. Journal of Consciousness Studies 7 (4):51-53.
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  49. Valerie Gray Hardcastle (2000). How to Understand the N in NCC. In Thomas Metzinger (ed.), Neural Correlates of Consciousness. MIT Press.
  50. Valerie Gray Hardcastle (2000). Interpreting Minds. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 60 (3):737-739.
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