Search results for 'Vanessa Sage' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Vanessa Sage (2009). Encountering the Wilderness, Encountering the Mist: Nature, Romanticism, and Contemporary Paganism. Anthropology of Consciousness 20 (1):27-52.score: 240.0
    This article asks how ideas about nature in the 18th and 19th century Romantic movement have traveled in and been translated by the various religious groups that constitute contemporary Paganism. Drawing on the work of poets, philosophers, historians, social scientists, and contemporary Pagans themselves, the article argues that contemporary Paganism borrows freely from Romantic notions of inspiration and imagination to craft a vision of nature, that, for them, responds to the emotional and political needs of their own time and place. (...)
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  2. Matzkin Alexandre & Nurock Vanessa (2007). Classical and Bohmian Trajectories in Semiclassical Systems: Mismatch in Dynamics, Mismatch in Reality? Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B.score: 30.0
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  3. William M. Sage (2010). Will Embryonic Stem Cells Change Health Policy? Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 38 (2):342-351.score: 30.0
    Embryonic stem cells are actively debated in political and public policy arenas. However, the connections between stem cell innovation and overall health care policy are seldom elucidated. As with many controversial aspects of medical care, the stem cell debate bridges to a variety of social conversations beyond abortion. Some issues, such as translational medicine, commercialization, patient and public safety, health care spending, physician practice, and access to insurance and health care services, are core health policy concerns. Other issues, such as (...)
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  4. James Sage (2004). Truth-Reliability and the Evolution of Human Cognitive Faculties. Philosophical Studies 117 (1-2):95-106.score: 30.0
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  5. William M. Sage (2012). How Many Justices Does It Take to Change the US Health System? Hastings Center Report 42 (5):27-33.score: 30.0
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  6. Cliff Karchmer, Pam Tully, Leah Devlin, Frank Whitney & Michael Sage (2003). New Pressures/New Partnerships: Public Health and Law Enforcement. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 31 (s4):52-53.score: 30.0
  7. Michael M. Sage (2008). Dillon (S.), Welch (K.E.) (Edd.) Representations of War in Ancient Rome. Pp. Xiv + 365, Ills, Map. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2006. Cased, £55, US$90. ISBN: 978-0-521-84817-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 58 (01).score: 30.0
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  8. Michael M. Sage (2003). Military Religion in the East O. Stoll: Zwischen Integration and Abgrenzung. Die Religion Des Römischen Heeres Im Nahen Osten . Pp. 703. St Katharinen: Scripta Mercaturae Verlag, 2001. Cased, €57.50. Isbn: 3-89590-116-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 53 (02):429-.score: 30.0
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  9. William M. Sage (forthcoming). Solidarity: Unfashionable, but Still American. Hastings Center Report.score: 30.0
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  10. Brian Z. Tamanaha, Caroline Mary Sage & Michael J. V. Woolcock (eds.) (2012). Legal Pluralism and Development: Scholars and Practitioners in Dialogue. Cambridge University Press.score: 30.0
    Machine generated contents note: Part I. Origins and Contours: 1. Historical perspectives on legal pluralism Lauren Benton; 2. The rule of law and legal pluralism in development Brian Z. Tamanaha; 3. Bendable rules: the development implications of human rights pluralism David Kinley; 4. Legal pluralism and legal culture: mapping the terrain Sally Engle Merry; 5. Towards equity in development when the law is not the law: reflections on legal pluralism in practice Daniel Adler and So Sokbunthouen; Part II. Theoretical Foundations (...)
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  11. Dan Sage, Andy Dainty & Naomi Brookes (2011). Blank Figures' and the Material Organisation of Knowledge: Experiences of a 'Project File. International Journal of Management Concepts and Philosophy 5 (1):40.score: 30.0
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  12. Evan T. Sage (1933). Correspondence. The Classical Review 47 (01):45-.score: 30.0
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  13. P. Sage (1979). Quelques aspects de l'expression narrative dans les XII Césars de Suétone. Revue Belge de Philologie Et D'Histoire 57 (1):18-50.score: 30.0
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  14. M. M. Sage (2003). Review: Zwischen Integration and Abgrenzung. Die Religion des romischen Heeres im Nahen Osten. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 53 (2):429-431.score: 30.0
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  15. William M. Sage (2010). Some Principles Require Principals : Why Banning 'Conflicts of Interest' Won't Solve Incentive Problems in Biomedical Research. In Thomas H. Murray & Josephine Johnston (eds.), Trust and Integrity in Biomedical Research: The Case of Financial Conflicts of Interest. Johns Hopkins University Press.score: 30.0
     
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  16. Jonathan Sage (2003). The Future is Past: The Ultimate Paradox. Book Guild.score: 30.0
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  17. Jonathan Sage (2001). The Supreme Paradox: A Book for the Third Millennium. Book Guild.score: 30.0
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  18. Paula Winsor Sage (forthcoming). Vatic Admonition in Horace Odes 4.9. American Journal of Philology.score: 30.0
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  19. [deleted]Siffredi Vanessa, McIlroy Alissandra, Anderson Vicki, Leventer Richard, Wood Amanda & Spencer-Smith Megan (2013). Language and Communication in Children with Agenesis of the Corpus Callosum. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 30.0
  20. Finch Vanessa (1997). The Measures of Insolvency Law. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 17 (2).score: 30.0
     
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  21. Anne Carol (2011). Sage-femme ou gynécologue ? M.-A. Boivin (1773-1841). Clio 1:237-260.score: 22.0
    Marie-Anne Boivin a été en son temps une des sages-femmes françaises les plus célèbres. Son parcours professionnel et scientifique est présenté ici, illustrant l’espace laissé aux femmes dans les professions médicales. Reconnue d’abord pour ses ouvrages techniques concernant l’obstétrique, elle sort de son champ traditionnel de compétence pour aborder de façon novatrice la gynécologie naissante, à l’instar des médecins, avec son Traité pratique des maladies de l’utérus (1833), devenu un classique. Cette œuvre scientifique lui vaut un succès d’estime, mais ne (...)
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  22. Maria Lúcia Mott (2004). Une sage-femme franco-brésilienne à Rio de Janeiro au XIXe siècle. Clio 19.score: 21.0
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  23. Robert E. Allinson (1994). Moral Values and the Taoist Sage in the Tao de Ching. Asian Philosophy 4 (2):127 – 136.score: 18.0
    Abstract The theme of this paper is that while there are four seemingly contradictory classes of statements in the Tao de Ching regarding moral values and the Taoist sage, these statements can be interpreted to be consistent with each other. There are statements which seemingly state or imply that nothing at all can be said about the Tao; there are statements which seemingly state or imply that all value judgements are relative; there are statements which appear to attribute moral (...)
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  24. Gail M. Presbey (2008). Secularism and Rationality in Odera Oruka's Sage Philosophy Project. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 28:121-128.score: 18.0
    Prof. H. Odera Oruka started the sage philosophy project, in which he interviewed wise elders in Kenyan rural areas to show that Africans could philosophize. He intended to create a “national culture” by drawing upon sages from different ethnic groups and he downplayed religious differences, as did Kwame Nkrumah, who had a similar goal of building “national culture” in Ghana. Both projects were secular insofar as they preferred to emphasize rationality and downplay religious belief or “superstition” as backward and (...)
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  25. Robert Elliot Allinson (2011). The Butterfly, the Mole and the Sage. Asian Philosophy 19 (3):213-223.score: 18.0
    Zhuangzi chooses a butterfly as a metaphor for transformation, a sighted creature whose inherent nature contains, and symbolizes, the potential for transformation from a less valued state to a more valued state. If transformation is not to be valued; if, according to a recent article by Jung Lee, 'there is no implication that it is either possible or desirable for the living to awake from their dream', why not tell a story of a mole awakening from a dream? This would (...)
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  26. Dan Heilbrunn (2009). Hermann Hesse and the Daodejing on the Wu 無 and You 有 of Sage-Leaders. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 8 (1):79-93.score: 18.0
    Hermann Hesse (1877–1962), the poet, novelist, man of letters, and painter, created characters who, like the Daoist sages, had many paradoxical characteristics. Some of Hesse’s characters manage their paradoxical natures well and, like the balanced sages, are able to be simultaneously changing yet stable, full of life but also empty, in unison with nature and the social world. Centered between interchanging extremes, these balanced individuals are carefree yet self-controlled, efficacious in their work yet seemingly inactive, and successful in sustaining leadership (...)
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  27. Amy Olberding (2007). Sorrow and the Sage: Grief in the Zhuangzi. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 6 (4):339-359.score: 18.0
    The Zhuangzi offers two apparently incompatible models of bereavement. Zhuangzi sometimes suggests that the sage will greet loss with unfractured equanimity and even aplomb. However, upon the death of his own wife, Zhuangzi evinces a sorrow that, albeit brief, fits ill with this suggestion. In this essay, I contend that the grief that Zhuangzi displays at his wife’s death better honors wider values averred elsewhere in the text and, more generally, that a sage who retains a capacity for (...)
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  28. Kristian Petersen (2011). Understanding the Sources of the Sino-Islamic Intellectual Tradition: A Review Essay on the Sage Learning of Liu Zhi: Islamic Thought in Confucian Terms, by Sachiko Murata, William C. Chittick, and Tu Weiming, and Recent Chinese Literary Treasuries. Philosophy East and West 61 (3):546-559.score: 18.0
    An oft-quoted Hadith purports that it is incumbent upon every Muslim to seek knowledge, even if it is to be found as far away as China.1 However, the plethora of knowledge that was discovered there generally has yet to be unraveled by Western academics. If the intellectual tradition of Chinese Muslims may appear to be of minor consequence to the larger field of Islamic studies, this is in part because of our failure to assess their influence. The abundant resources for (...)
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  29. Peter Allen, Steve Maguire & Bill McKelvey (eds.) (2011). The Sage Handbook of Complexity and Management. Sage.score: 18.0
    The SAGE Handbook of Complexity and Management will be the first substantive scholarly work to provide a map of the state of art research in the growing field ...
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  30. Robert C. Roberts (1994). Review: The Philosopher as Sage: A Review Essay. [REVIEW] Journal of Religious Ethics 22 (2):407 - 431.score: 18.0
    Recent books by Paul Johnston, D. Z. Phillips, Philip Shields, and B. R. Tilghman all depict Wittgenstein as centrally concerned with ethics, but they range from representing his main works as expressing and advocating a particular religious-ethical outlook (Shields) to arguing that his work has no ethical content but aims primarily to clarify such logical distinctions as that between ethical and empirical judgments (Johnston). All four books raise the question about the moral philosopher's proper role, and each suggests a rather (...)
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  31. Lai Chen (2007). “After-Sage” Life Pursuits: The Ethical Meaning of Feng Youlan's Xin Shixun. [REVIEW] Frontiers of Philosophy in China 2 (3):363-378.score: 18.0
    Feng Youlan’s Xin Shixun 新世训 (New Treatise on the Way of Life) written in the late 1930s differed from traditional moral teachings because it focused on nonmoral life lessons and how to virtuously pursue success. It advanced an interpretation of traditional virtues as life lessons for young people, so that these virtues could transform an individual life in modern society. Thereby the morals of ancient sages could transfer to the modern, individual, and morality. The problem is just how the ideals (...)
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  32. Danielle Lories (2013). La phronesis du sage stoicien. Areté. Revista de Filosofía 11 (1-2):219 - 244.score: 18.0
    The traditional image of the stoic sage, retired and solitary, indifferent to all that does not "rely" on him, and thus to the most part of events that mark the course of the world and of human lives, is a simplistic view that ought to be reconsidered. To do so, we try to show that the virtue borrowed from the sophos by the texts of ancient stoicism has indeed the traits of the Aristotelian phronesis, political excellence and thus virtue (...)
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  33. Steve Maguire, Peter Allen & Bill McKelvey (2011). Complexity and Management: Introducing the SAGE Handbook. In Peter Allen, Steve Maguire & Bill McKelvey (eds.), The Sage Handbook of Complexity and Management. Sage. 1--26.score: 18.0
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  34. Eduardo Molina (2013). Kant and the ideal of the Sage. Ideas Y Valores 62:171-183.score: 18.0
    En este artículo se analiza la posible influencia del estoicismo en algunos aspectos precisos de la ética kantiana. Se intenta defender la tesis de que, aunque Kant critica muchas veces la ética estoica y en especial su eudemonismo, también adopta en su ética algunas de las posiciones estoicas y las incorpora en ciertos aspectos clave de su propia Doctrina de la virtud. En especial, se intenta mostrar cómo adopta Kant el ideal del sabio estoico y una de sus características más (...)
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  35. Lauren F. Pfister (2013). Sublating Reverence to Parents: A Kierkegaardian Interpretation of the Sage‐King Shun's Piety. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 40 (1):50-66.score: 18.0
    In the Mengzi there is a hypothetical situation relating how the ancient sage-king Shun 舜 would respond if his father had committed murder. This has recently become a source of debate among Chinese philosophers. Here we will apply arguments made by Johannes de silentio (Kierkegaard's pseudonym) about the “teleological suspension of the ethical” related to the action of the biblical Abraham, and link them up to alternative interpretations of the actions of Shun. This challenges the current and traditional interpretations (...)
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  36. Gail M. Presbey (2002). African Sage Philosophy and Socrates. International Philosophical Quarterly 42 (2):177-192.score: 18.0
    The paper explores the methodology and goals of H. Odera Oruka’s sage philosophy project. Oruka interviewed wise persons who were mostly illiterate and from the rural areas of Kenya to show that a long tradition of critical thinking and philosophizing exists in Africa, even if there is no written record. His descriptions of the role of the academic philosopher turned interviewer varied, emphasizing their refraining from imposition of their own views (the social science model), their adding their own ideas (...)
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  37. Gail M. Presbey, African Sage Philosophy. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 18.0
    African Sage Philosophy The Sage Philosophy Project began in the mid-1970s at the Department of Philosophy of the University of Nairobi Kenya. At the University, Henry Odera Oruka (1944-1995) popularized the term “Sage Philosophy Project,” and closely related terms such as “philosophic sagacity,” both by initiating a project of interviewing African sages, and by naming […].
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  38. Vanessa Lemm (2011). Vanessa Lemm (Editora). Michel Foucault: Neoliberalismo y Biopolítica. Revista de Filosofia 67:303-305.score: 18.0
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  39. Griet Vankeerberghen (1995). Emotions and the Actions of the Sage: Recommendations for an Orderly Heart in the "Huainanzi". Philosophy East and West 45 (4):527-544.score: 16.0
    Various passages of the "Huainanzi" (ca. 139 B.C.) that bear upon the topic of emotions are brought together and the connections among these are demonstrated. There is a special focus on anger and desire. Emotions are analyzed as motions of qi that arise almost inevitably from a person's interactions with his environment. The "Huainanzi" adopts two models to describe the sagely way of dealing with these "motions": an active model in which the heart is seen as the faculty in control, (...)
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  40. David Forman (2008). Free Will and the Freedom of the Sage in Leibniz and the Stoics. History of Philosophy Quarterly 25 (3):203-219.score: 15.0
  41. Michel Janssen, Einstein: The Old Sage and the Young Turk.score: 15.0
    There is a striking difference between the methodology of the young Einstein and that of the old. I argue that Einstein’s switch in the late 1910s from a moderate empiricism to an extreme rationalism should at least in part be understood against the background of his crushing personal and political experiences during the war years in Berlin. As a result of these experiences, Einstein started to put into practice what, drawing on Schopenhauer, he had preached for years, namely to use (...)
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  42. Charles Huenemann (2004). The Sage Meets the Zombie: Spinoza's Wise Man and Chalmers' The Conscious Mind. Studia Spinozana: An International and Interdisciplinary Series 14:21-33.score: 15.0
  43. Miranda Brown & Uffe Bergeton (2008). "Seeing" Like a Sage: Three Takes on Identity and Perception in Early China. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 35 (4):641-662.score: 15.0
  44. Lara Denis (2000). Kant's Cold Sage and the Sublimity of Apathy. Kantian Review 4:48-73.score: 15.0
    Some Kantian ethicists, myself included, have been trying to show how, contrary to popular belief, Kant makes an important place in his moral theory for emotions–especially love and sympathy. This paper confronts claims of Kant that seem to endorse an absence of sympathetic emotions. I analyze Kant’s accounts of different sorts of emotions (“affects,” “passions,” and “feelings”), and different sorts of emotional coolness (“apathy,” “self-mastery,” and “cold-bloodedness”). I focus on the particular way that Kant praises apathy, as “sublime,” in order (...)
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  45. Dydia DeLyser (ed.) (2010). The Sage Handbook of Qualitative Geography. Sage.score: 15.0
    The process of learning qualitative research has altered dramatically and this Handbook explores the growth, change, and complexity within the topic and looks ...
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  46. Jeffrey Rubenstein (1998). Elisha Ben Abuya: Torah and the Sinful Sage. Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 7 (2):139-225.score: 15.0
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  47. D. Murphy (2001). Folk Psychology Meets the Frame Problem - W. F. G. Haselager, Cognitive Science and Folk Psychology (London: Sage Publications, 1997), X + 165 Pp. ISBN 0-761-95425-2 Hardback £55.00; ISBN 0-761-95426-0 Paperback £17.99. [REVIEW] Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 32 (3):565-573.score: 15.0
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  48. Aletta J. Norval (1998). Review Essay : The New Democracy: Feminism Between Multiculturalism and Anti-Essentialism: Jodi Dean (Ed.) Feminism and the New Democracy: Resiting the Political (London: Sage Publications, 1997). Pp. 274. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Social Criticism 24 (6):127-132.score: 15.0
  49. Daniel M. Hausman (2004). Trust and Trustworthiness, by Russell Hardin. Russell Sage Foundation, 2002, XXI + 234 Pages. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 20 (1):240-246.score: 15.0
  50. David Schweickart, Democratic Socialism Encyclopedia of Activism and Social Justice Sage Reference Project (Forthcoming).score: 15.0
    Democratic Socialism -- The relationship between democracy and socialism is a curious one. Both traditions are rooted philosophically in the concept of equality, but different aspects of equality are emphasized. Democracy appeals to political equality, the right of all individuals to participate in setting the rules to which all will be subject. Socialism emphasizes material equality--not strict equality, but an end to the vast disparities of income and wealth traceable to the inequalities of ownership of means of production.
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