Search results for 'Vatsyayana' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  6
    Mallanaga Vatsyayana (2009). Kamasutra. OUP Oxford.
    The Kamasutra is the oldest extant Hindu textbook of erotic love. About the art of living as well as about the positions in sexual intercourse, it is here newly translated into clear, vivid, sexually frank English together with three commentaries: excerpts from the earliest and most famous Sanskrit commentary , a twentieth-century Hindi commentary, and explanatory notes by the translators. The edition is enhanced by a selection of colour plates from an early edition of the work.
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  2. Matthew Kapstein, Nyayabhasya Vatsyayana, Uddyotakara, Santaraksita & Kamala Sila (1987). Self and Personal Identity in Indian Buddhist Scholasticism a Philosophical Investigation. Umi.
    The topic of this dissertation is one that has been in the forefront of contemporary metaphysics in the Anglo-American philosophical tradition, namely, the problem of personal identity through time. Although we generally believe that we remain the same persons throughout our lives, the answers to questions concerning just what it is that remains the same about us prove to be elusive. Contemporary debate on the subject has its roots in the challenges posed by Locke and Hume to theories which assert (...)
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  3. Matthew R. Dasti (forthcoming). Vatsyayana: Cognition as a Guide to Action. In Jonardon Ganeri (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Indian Philosophy.
    Pakṣilasvāmin Vātsyāyana (c. 450 CE) is the author of the Commentary on Nyāya (Nyāya-bhāṣya), the first full commentary on the Nyāya-sūtra of Gautama (c. 150 CE), which is itself the foundational text of the school of philosophy called “Nyāya.” The Nyāya tradition is home to a number of leading voices within the classical Indian philosophical scene and is celebrated in later doxographies as one of the six “orthodox” systems of Hindu thought. Given the way that sūtra texts and their first (...)
     
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  4.  3
    Ludo Rocher (1985). The Kāmasūtra: Vātsyāyana's Attitude Toward Dharma and Dharmaśāstra. Journal of the American Oriental Society 105 (3):521-529.
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  5. Gautama (1982). Nyāya: Gautama's Nyāya-Sūtra, with Vātsyāyana's Commentary. Indian Studies.
     
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  6. Gautama (1912/1984). The Nyāya-Sūṭras of Gauṭama: With the Bhāṣya of Vāṭsyāyana and the Vārṭika of Uḍḍyoṭakara. Motilal Banarsidass.
     
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  7. Krishna Del Toso (2011). Is Cognition an Attribute of the Self or It Rather Belongs to the Body? Some Dialectical Considerations on Udbhaṭabhaṭṭa’s Position Against Nyāya and Vaiśeṣika. Open Journal of Philosophy 1 (2):48-56.
    In this article an attempt is made to detect what could have been the dialectical reasons that impelled the Cārvāka thinker Udbhaṭabhaṭṭa to revise and reformulate the classical materialistic concept of cognition. If indeed according to ancient Cārvākas, cognition is an attribute entirely dependent on the physical body, for Udbhaṭabhaṭṭa cognition is an independent principle that, of course, needs the presence of a human body for manifesting itself. Therefore, he seems to describe cognition according to a double ontology: it is (...)
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  8.  4
    Payal Doctor (2015). Quotations, References, and the Re-Use of Texts in the Early Nyāya Tradition. Journal of Indian Philosophy 43 (2-3):109-135.
    In this case-study, I examine examples which fall within the five categories of the re-use of texts in the Nyāya Sūtra, Nyāya Bhāṣya, and Nyāya Vārttika and note the form of quoting and embedment. It is found that the re-use of texts is prominent and that the category and method of embedding the re-used passages varies from author to author. Gautama embeds the most interlanguage quotations without acknowledging his sources and Uddyotakara re-uses the most quotations and paraphrases while acknowledging his (...)
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  9.  57
    Parimal G. Patil (2010). History, Philology, and the Philosophical Study of Sanskrit Texts. Journal of Indian Philosophy 38 (2):163-202.
    This paper is a critical review of Jonardan Ganeri’s Philosophy in Classical India.
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  10.  16
    Alberto Todeschini (2010). Twenty-Two Ways to Lose a Debate: A Gricean Look at the Nyāyasūtra 's Points of Defeat. [REVIEW] Journal of Indian Philosophy 38 (1):49-74.
    This paper is a study of debate practices as seen in the Nyāyasūtra and a number of commentaries. It concentrates on the ‘Points of Defeat ’, i.e., those occasions that if met in debate would entail defeat. The conditions under which a debater would meet with defeat were discussed widely in India and have also attracted considerable attention from modern scholars. In order to better understand this subject, use is made of some of the intuitions about language and conversation that (...)
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  11. Wendy Doniger (2011). From Kama to Karma: The Resurgence of Puritanism in Contemporary India. Social Research: An International Quarterly 78 (1):49-74.
    Erotic religious imagery is as old as Hinduism. The earliest Hindu sacred text, the Rig Veda , revels in the language of both pleasure and fertility. In addition to this and other religious texts that incorporated eroticism, there were more worldly texts that treated the erotic tout court, of which the Kamasutra, composed in north India, probably in the third century CE, is the most famous. The two words in its title mean "desire/love/pleasure/sex" and "a treatise" . Virtually nothing is (...)
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  12.  12
    Daud Ali (2011). Padmaśrī's Nāgarasarvasva and the World of Medieval Kāmaśāstra. Journal of Indian Philosophy 39 (1):41-62.
    This essay focuses on a neglected and important text, the Nāgarasarvasva of Padmaśrī, as an index to the changing contours of kāmaśāstra in the early second millennium (1000-1500) CE. Focusing on a number of themes which linked Padmaśrī’s work with contemporary treatises, the essay argues that kāmaśāstra incorporated several new conceptions of the body and related para-technologies as well as elements of material and aesthetic culture which had become prominent in the cosmopolitan, courtly milieu. Rather than seeing this development as (...)
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  13.  6
    Toso Krishna Del (2011). Is Cognition an Attribute of the Self or It Rather Belongs to the Body? Some Dialectical Considerations on Udbhatabhatta's Position Against Nyāya and Vaisesika. Open Journal of Philosophy 1 (2):48.
    In this article an attempt is made to detect what could have been the dialectical reasons that impelled the Cār-vāka thinker Udbhatabhatta to revise and reformulate the classical materialistic concept of cognition. If indeed according to ancient Cārvākas cognition is an attribute entirely dependent on the physical body, for Udbhatabhatta cognition is an independent principle that, of course, needs the presence of a human body to manifest itself and for this very reason it is said to be a peculiarity of (...)
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  14.  7
    Krishna Del Toso (2011). Is Cognition an Attribute of the Self or It Rather Belongs to the Body? Some Dialectical Considerations on Udbhatabhatta's Position Against Nyāya and Vaisesika. Open Journal of Philosophy 1:48.
    In this article an attempt is made to detect what could have been the dialectical reasons that impelled the Cārvāka thinker Udbhaṭabhaṭṭa to revise and reformulate the classical materialistic concept of cognition. If indeed according to ancient Cārvākas, cognition is an attribute, entirely dependent on the physical body, for Udbhaṭabhaṭṭa cognition is an independent principle that, of course, needs the presence of a human body for manifesting itself. He, thus, seems to describe cognition according to a double ontology: it is (...)
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