Search results for 'Vaughan Radcliffe' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  17
    Clinton Free & Vaughan Radcliffe (2009). Accountability in Crisis: The Sponsorship Scandal and the Office of the Comptroller General in Canada. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 84 (2):189 - 208.
    For much of the last 50 years, a key platform animating public sector reform in Canada and elsewhere has been that efficiency and effectiveness can be achieved by adapting private sector financial management methods and practices. We argue that the recent re-establishment of the Office of the Comptroller General (OCG) of Canada represents a key element of a program of strengthening financial accountability that has emerged within the Canadian Federal Government. Although this program is longstanding and is associated Canada’s implementation (...)
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  2.  3
    Clinton Free, Vaughan S. Radcliffe & Brent White (2013). Crisis, Committees and Consultants: The Rise of Value-For-Money Auditing in the Federal Public Sector in Canada. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 113 (3):441-459.
    This paper investigates the key drivers behind the origins of value-for-money (VFM) audit in Canada and the aims, intents, and logics ascribed by the original proponents. Drawing on insights from governmentality and New Public Management, the paper utilizes analysis methods adapted from case study research to review a wide range of primary documentation (e.g., Hansards from the Public Accounts Committee, House of Commons debates, the so-called Wilson report and the FMCS study) and secondary documentation (newspaper articles, Office of the Auditor (...)
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  3. Clinton Free & Vaughan Radcliffe (2009). Accountability in Crisis: The Sponsorship Scandal and the Office of the Comptroller General in Canada. Journal of Business Ethics 84 (2):189-208.
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  4.  3
    NicolÁs Vaughan (2006). Ángela Uribe B.: Oil, Economics and Cultire: The U Wa S Case (Nicolás Vaughan). Ideas Y Valores 55 (130):102-105.
  5.  3
    Charles Edwyn Vaughan (1925/1972). Studies in the History of Political Philosophy Before and After Rousseau. New York,B. Franklin.
    From Hobbes to Hume, with portrait and memoir.--v. 2. From Burke to Mazzini, with A list of the writings of Professor Vaughan, by H. B. Charlton (p. v-xvii).
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  6.  2
    Geoffrey M. Vaughan (2007). Behemoth Teaches Leviathan: Thomas Hobbes on Political Education. Lexington Books.
    Did Hobbes's political philosophy have practical intentions? There exists no "Hobbist" school of thought; no new political order was inspired by Hobbesian precepts. Yet in Behemoth Teaches Leviathan Geoffrey M. Vaughan revisits Behemoth to reveal hitherto unexplored pedagogic purpose to Hobbes's political philosophy.
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  7. Geoffrey M. Vaughan (2002). Behemoth Teaches Leviathan: Thomas Hobbes on Political Education. Lexington Books.
    Did Hobbes's political philosophy have practical intentions? There exists no 'Hobbist' school of thought; no new political order was inspired by Hobbesian precepts. Yet in Behemoth Teaches Leviathan Geoffrey M. Vaughan revisits Behemoth to reveal hitherto unexplored pedagogic purpose to Hobbes's political philosophy.
     
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  8.  4
    Hunter Vaughan (2013). Where Film Meets Philosophy: Godard, Resnais, and Experiments in Cinematic Thinking. Columbia University Press.
    Closely reading the films of Jean-Luc Godard and Alain Resnais, Hunter Vaughan establishes a connection between phenomenology and image-philosophy to analyze the moving image and its challenge to conventional modes of thought.
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  9. Connor Diemand-Yauman, Daniel M. Oppenheimer & Erikka B. Vaughan (2011). Fortune Favors the (): Effects of Disfluency on Educational Outcomes. Cognition 118 (1):111-115.
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  10.  71
    Frank Tong, K. Nakayama, J. T. Vaughan & Nancy Kanwisher (1998). Binocular Rivalry and Visual Awareness in Human Extrastriate Cortex. Neuron 21:753-59.
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  11.  22
    Sharon K. Vaughan (2015). Rousseau’s Social Contract: An Introduction by David Lay Williams. [REVIEW] Review of Metaphysics 69 (1):159-160.
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  12. Dana Radcliffe (1997). Scott-Kakures on Believing at Will. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 57 (1):145-151.
    Many philosophers hold that it is conceptually impossible to form a belief simply by willing it. Noting the failure of previous attempts to locate the presumed incoherence, Dion Scott-Kakures offers a version of the general line that voluntary believing is conceptually impossible becuse it could not qualify as a basic intentional actions. This discussion analyzes his central argument, explaining how it turns on the assumption that a prospective voluntary believer must regard the desired belief as not justified, given her other (...)
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  13. Elizabeth S. Radcliffe (2006). Moral Internalism and Moral Cognitivism in Hume's Metaethics. Synthese 152 (3):353 - 370.
    Most naturalists think that the belief/desire model from Hume is the best framework for making sense of motivation. As Smith has argued, given that the cognitive state (belief) and the conative state (desire) are separate on this model, if a moral judgment is cognitive, it could not also be motivating by itself. So, it looks as though Hume and Humeans cannot hold that moral judgments are states of belief (moral cognitivism) and internally motivating (moral internalism). My chief claim is that (...)
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  14.  29
    Elizabeth S. Radcliffe (2015). The Inertness of Reason and Hume's Legacy (On-Line Publication 2015, Issue Backdated to 2012). Canadian Journal of Philosophy 42 (S1):117-33.
    Hume argues against the seventeenth-century rationalists that reason is impotent to motivate action and to originate morality. Hume's arguments have standardly been considered the foundation for the Humean theory of motivation in contemporary philosophy. The Humean theory alleges that beliefs require independent desires to motivate action. Recently, however, new commentaries allege that Hume's argument concerning the inertness of reason has no bearing on whether beliefs can motivate. These commentaries maintain that for Hume, beliefs about future pleasurable and painful objects on (...)
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  15.  18
    Elizabeth S. Radcliffe (2015). Strength of Mind and the Calm and Violent Passions. Res Philosophica 92 (3):1-21.
    Hume’s distinction between the calm and violent passions is one whose boundaries are not entirely clear. However, it is crucial to understanding his motivational theory and to identifying an unusual virtue he calls “strength of mind,” the motivational prevalence of the calm passions over the violent. In this paper, I investigate the boundaries of the calm passions and consider the constitution of strength of mind and why Hume regards it as an admirable trait. These are provocative issues for two reasons. (...)
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  16. Barry Vaughan (2012). Review: Pierpaolo Donati, Relational Sociology: A New Paradigm for the Social Sciences London and New York: Routledge, 2010. 254 Pp. ISBN 978-0-415-56748-0, Hardback £85.00/$140.00. [REVIEW] Journal of Critical Realism 11 (2):255-261.
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  17.  40
    Elizabeth S. Radcliffe (1994). Hume on Motivating Sentiments, the General Point of View, and the Inculcation of "Morality". Hume Studies 20 (1):37-58.
    That Hume 's theory can be interpreted in two widely divergent ways-as a version of sentimentalism and as an ideal observer theory-is symptomatic of a puzzle ensconced in Hume 's theory. How can the ground of morality be internal and motivating when an inference to the feelings of a spectator in "the general point of view" is typically necessary to get to genuine moral distinctions? This paper considers and rejects the suggestion that in moral education, for Hume, the inculcation of (...)
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  18.  78
    Elizabeth S. Radcliffe (1999). Hume on the Generation of Motives: Why Beliefs Alone Never Motivate. Hume Studies 25 (1-2):101-122.
    Hume’s thesis that reason alone does not motivate is taken as the ground for this theory: Reason produces beliefs only, and beliefs are mere representations of fact, which, without passions for the objects the beliefs concern, cannot move anyone at all. Discussions of the Humean theory of motivation usually begin with the motivating passions in place without asking about their genesis. This emphasis, I think, overlooks a good deal of what Hume’s thesis concerning the motivational impotence of reason is about: (...)
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  19.  9
    Dana Radcliffe (1997). Scott-Kakures on Believing at Will. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 57 (1):145 - 151.
    Many philosophers hold that it is conceptually impossible to form a belief simply by willing it. Noting the failure of previous attempts to locate the presumed incoherence, Dion Scott-Kakures offers a version of the general line that voluntary believing is conceptually impossible becuse it could not qualify as a basic intentional actions. This discussion analyzes his central argument, explaining how it turns on the assumption that a prospective voluntary believer must regard the desired belief as not justified, given her other (...)
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  20.  2
    William Vaughan (1981). Reinforcement or Maximization? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 4 (3):405.
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  21.  7
    Elizabeth S. Radcliffe (2015). Hume's Psychology of the Passions: The Literature and Future Directions. Journal of the History of Philosophy 53 (4):565-605.
    in a recent article entitled “Hume on the Passions,” Stephen Buckle opens with the claim that Hume’s theory of the passions has largely been neglected. “Apart from a couple of famous sections in the Treatise concerning the sources of action,” he writes, “the subject matter has rarely excited interest.”1 His analysis of why the subject of the passions in Hume has been uninspiring points to the fact that readers have largely misunderstood the point of Hume’s theory. They usually regard the (...)
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  22. Elizabeth S. Radcliffe (2008). The Humean Theory of Motivation and its Critics. In A Companion to Hume. Wiley-Blackwell
  23.  66
    Elizabeth S. Radcliffe (1996). How Does the Humean Sense of Duty Motivate? Journal of the History of Philosophy 34 (3):383-407.
    On Hume's account, when we lack virtues that would typically prompt moral action, we can instead be motivated by the "sense of duty." Surprisingly, Hume seems to maintain that, in such cases, we are motivated by a desire to avoid the unpleasantness of "self-hatred" evoked in us when we realize we lack certain traits others possess. This account has led commentators to argue that Hume is not a moral internalist, since motivation by duty is motivation by a self-interested desire. This (...)
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  24.  34
    Elizabeth S. Radcliffe (1997). Kantian Tunes on a Humean Instrument: Why Hume Is Not Really a Skeptic About Practical Reasoning. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 27 (2):247 -.
  25.  5
    Barry E. Stein, Terrance R. Stanford, Mark T. Wallace, J. William Vaughan & Wan Jiang (2004). Crossmodal Spatial Interactions in Subcortical and Cortical Circuits. In Charles Spence & Jon Driver (eds.), Crossmodal Space and Crossmodal Attention. OUP Oxford
  26.  9
    Diane Vaughan (2008). Bourdieu and Organizations: The Empirical Challenge. [REVIEW] Theory and Society 37 (1):65-81.
  27.  69
    Elizabeth S. Radcliffe (2008). Reason, Morality, and Hume's "Active Principles" : Comments on Rachel Cohon's Hume's Morality: Feeling and Fabrication. Hume Studies 34 (2):267-276.
    Rachel Cohon's Hume is a moral sensing theorist, who holds both that moral qualities are mind-dependent and that there is such a thing as moral knowledge. He is an anti-rationalist about motivation, arguing that reason alone does not motivate, but allows that both beliefs and passions are motivating. And he is both a descriptive and a normative moral theorist who, despite having resources for putting checks on our sentimentally-based moral evaluations, does end up with a kind of a relativistic account (...)
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  28.  37
    Elizabeth S. Radcliffe (2004). Love and Benevolence in Hutcheson's and Hume's Theories of the Passions. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 12 (4):631 – 653.
  29.  6
    Nancy Eisenberg, Claire Hofer & Julie Vaughan (2007). Effortful Control and its Socioemotional Consequences. In James J. Gross (ed.), Handbook of Emotion Regulation. Guilford Press 287--306.
  30.  11
    James Vaughan (1935). Race and Culture Contact. Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 10 (3):507-510.
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  31.  11
    Donna Vaughan (2011). The Importance of Capabilities in the Sustainability of Information and Communications Technology Programs: The Case of Remote Indigenous Australian Communities. [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 13 (2):131-150.
    The use of the capability approach as an evaluative tool for Information and Communication Technology (ICT) policy and programs in developing countries, in particular at a grass-roots community level, is an emerging field of application. However, one of the difficulties with ICT for development (ICT4D) evaluations is in linking what is often no more than a resource, for example basic access, to actual outcomes, or means to end. This article argues that the capability approach provides a framework for evaluating the (...)
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  32.  3
    Steven Vaughan, Linden Thomas & Alastair Young (2015). Symbolism Over Substance? Large Law Firms and Corporate Social Responsibility. Legal Ethics 18 (2):138-163.
    ABSTRACTAt its core, corporate social responsibility concerns the impacts of businesses on their surroundings. Despite their significant economic and geographic presence, and despite the varied disciplinary and conceptual lenses used to study CSR, there is very little existing work looking at law firms and their own CSR policies. This paper fills part of that gap. In August 2014, we reviewed the websites of the top 100 English law firms, as ranked by the trade publication The Lawyer. We were interested in (...)
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  33. David A. Rosenbaum, Jonathan Vaughan, Ruud Gj Meulenbroek, Steven Jax & Rajal G. Cohen (2009). Smart Moves: The Psychology of Everyday Perceptual-Motor Acts. In Ezequiel Morsella, John A. Bargh & Peter M. Gollwitzer (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Human Action. Oxford University Press
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  34.  2
    Aloysius Martinich, S. Vaughan & D. L. Williams (2008). Hobbes's Religion and Political Philosophy: A Reply to Greg Forster. History of Political Thought 29 (1):49-64.
    A.P. Martinich's interpretation that in Leviathan Thomas Hobbes believed that the laws of nature are the commands of God and that he did not rely on the Bible to prove this has been criticized by Greg Forster in this journal (2003). Forster uses these criticisms to develop his own view that Hobbes was insincere when he professed religious beliefs. We argue that Forster misrepresents Martinich's view, is mistaken about what evidence is relevant to interpreting whether Hobbes was sincere or not, (...)
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  35.  2
    Michael Vaughan (2007). Introduction: Henri Bergson's Creative Evolution. Substance 36 (3):7-24.
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  36.  31
    Elizabeth S. Radcliffe (2012). Reasons From The Humean Perspective. Philosophical Quarterly 62 (249):777-796.
    Humeans about practical reasoning have tried to explain how some of our desires are reason‐giving and some are not. On one account, we act from reasons only when we act on desires that cohere in a consistent set. On another account, we act on reasons only when we act on desires that do not undermine our values. Both accounts are problematic. First, the notion of a consistent set of desires is vague and introduces a criterion not necessarily rooted in the (...)
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  37.  35
    Elizabeth S. Radcliffe (2011). Ruling Passions. The Philosophers' Magazine 54 (54):85-89.
    A radical implication of Hume’s theory of motivation is that it makes no sense, strictly speaking, to call actions rational or irrational. So, he claims, it is not contrary to reason for me to prefer the destruction of the world to getting a scratch on my finger.
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  38.  3
    Matthew Goode, Charles W. Radcliffe, Karen Estep, Andrew Odum & David Chiszar (1990). Field Observations on Feeding Behavior in an Aruba Island Rattlesnake : Strike-Induced Chemosensory Searching and Trail Following. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 28 (4):312-314.
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  39. Elizabeth S. Radcliffe (2007). Moral Naturalism and the Possibility of Making Ourselves Better. In Brad Wilburn (ed.), Moral Cultivation. Lexington Books
  40.  9
    William Radcliffe (1921). Fishing From the Earliest Times. Journal of Hellenic Studies 41:286.
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  41.  29
    Rachel Vaughan (1992). John Searle and His Critics. Philosophical Studies 33:256-260.
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  42.  12
    Elizabeth S. Radcliffe (2013). Moral Sentimentalism and the Reasonableness of Being Good. Revue Internationale de Philosophie 2013 (no. 263):9-27.
    In this paper, I discuss the implications of Hutcheson’s and Hume’s sentimentalist theories for the question of whether and how we can offer reasons to be moral. Hutcheson and Hume agree that reason does not give us ultimate ends. Because of this, on Hutcheson’s line, the possession of affections and of a moral sense makes practical reasons possible. On Hume’s view, that reason does not give us ultimate ends means that reason does not motivate on its own, and this makes (...)
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  43.  12
    E. E. Klimoff, W. E. Butler, Artist Keith Vaughan & R. McKitterick (2012). Recent Periodicals. Common Knowledge 18 (1):1.
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  44.  2
    David Duvall, David Chiszar, Jeanne Trupiano & Charles W. Radcliffe (1978). Preference for Envenomated Rodent Prey by Rattlesnakes. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 11 (1):7-8.
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  45. B. F. Skinner & M. E. Vaughan (1997). Enjoy Old Age a Practical Guide.
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  46. Megan Vaughan (2011). The History of Romantic Love in Sub-Saharan Africa: Between Interest and Emotion. Proceedings of the British Academy 167:1.
     
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  47.  10
    Hunter Vaughan (2010). The Paradox of Film: An Industry of Sex, a Form of Seduction (Notes on Jean Baudrillard's Seduction and the Cinema). Film-Philosophy 14 (2):41-61.
    Jean Baudrillard, the misfit. Jean Baudrillard, who told us that the Gulf Warnever happened, who drew our attention to the perils of a civilization thatchoses to lead a virtual existence in an arena of images and simulacra - this isthe Baudrillard we are mostly familiar with. But Jean Baudrillard, thechampion of appearances? Baudrillard, more-feminist-than-the-feminists?This Baudrillard remains buried in the stacks of a prolific career spanningover forty years and involving some of the most radical systematicdeconstructions of Western culture, society and politics. (...)
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  48.  22
    Rachel Vaughan (1992). The Structure of Emotions. Philosophical Studies 33:358-362.
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  49.  13
    Dana M. Radcliffe (1995). Nondoxastic Faith: Audi on Religious Commitment. [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 37 (2):73 - 86.
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  50.  1
    Karen Estep, Thomas Poole, Charles W. Radcliffe, Barbara O’Connell & David Chiszar (1981). Distance Traveled by Mice After Envenomation by a Rattlesnake. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 18 (3):108-110.
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