Search results for 'Velma Newton' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Velma Newton (1982). Lawyers, Should Thou Advertise?: A Bibliography of Materials on Legal Ethics and Lawyer Advertising. Faculty of Law Library, University of the West Indies.
     
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  2.  22
    Isaac Newton (1953/2005). Newton's Philosophy of Nature: Selections From His Writings. Dover Publications.
    Aside from the Principia and occasional appearances of the Opticks , Newton' writings have remained largely inaccessible to students of philosophy, science, and literature as well as to other readers. This book provides a remedy with wide representation of the interests, problems, and diverse philosophic issues that preoccupied the greatest scientific mind of the seventeenth century. Grouped in sections corresponding to methods, principles, and theological considerations, these selections feature explanatory notes and cross-references to related essays.
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  3. Isaac Newton & H. W. Turnbull (1961). The Correspondence of Isaac Newton. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 12 (47):255-258.
     
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  4. Isaac Newton, I. Bernard Cohen & Robert E. Schofield (1959). Isaac Newton's Papers and Letters on Natural Philosophy. Science and Society 23 (3):279-282.
     
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  5.  1
    William Newman & Isaac Newton (1987). Newton's Clavis as Starkey's Key. Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 78:564-574.
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  6. D. T. Whiteside & Isaac Newton (1984). The Mathematical Papers of Isaac Newton, Volume VIII: 1697-1722. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 35 (3):303-307.
     
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  7.  2
    J. Herivel & Isaac Newton (1962). Newton on Rotating Bodies. Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 53:212-218.
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  8.  1
    J. Mcguire, Martin Tamny & Isaac Newton (1985). Newton's Astronomical Apprenticeship: Notes of 1664/5. Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 76:349-365.
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  9. A. Rupert Hall, Isaac Newton & Laura Tilling (1979). The Correspondence of Isaac Newton. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 30 (2):173-177.
     
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  10. I. Bernard Cohen, Isaac Newton & Benjamin Franklin (1956). Franklin and Newton an Inquiry Into Speculative Newtonian Experimental Science and Franklin's Work in Electricity as an Example Thereof. American Philosophical Society.
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  11. John Milton & Thomas Newton (1758). Paradise Lost, a Poem. From the Text of T. Newton.
     
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  12. John Milton & Thomas Newton (1758). Paradise Regain'd, a Poem. To Which is Added Samson Agonistes: And Poems Upon Several Occasions. From the Text of T. Newton. [REVIEW]
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  13. K. M. Newton (1981). George Eliot, Romantic Humanist a Study of the Philosophical Structure of Her Novels /K.M. Newton. --. --. Barnes & Noble Books,1981.
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  14. Einstein Y. La Noción De Newton (2001). I NTRODUCCIÓN M ucha gente tiende a pensar que con la teoría de la relatividad de Einstein, el concepto de tiempo absoluto de Isaac Newton quedó totalmente refutado. 1 En este trabajo nos proponemos explorar la idea de que, al. Signos Filosóficos 5:65-81.
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  15. Isaac Newton & Marquise du Chastellet (1968). Principes mathématiques de la philosophie naturelle, t. I, Préfaces, suivies des Livres 1 et 2 de Newton : Du Mouvement des Corps, t. II : Livre 3 de Newton : Du système du monde. [REVIEW] Revue de Métaphysique et de Morale 73 (3):378-382.
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  16. Isaac Newton & H. W. Turnbull (1963). The Correspondence of Isaac Newton. Vol. III: 1688-1694. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 13 (52):332-334.
     
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  17. Ivo Schneider, Kolumban Hutter, Isaac Newton & Friedrich Steinle (1993). Isaac Newton. Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 24 (1):169-185.
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  18. J. F. Scott & Isaac Newton (1968). The Correspondence of Isaac Newton, Vol. IV: 1694-1709. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 19 (3):268-269.
     
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  19. Marius Stan (forthcoming). Euler, Newton, and Foundations for Mechanics. In Chris Smeenk & Eric Schliesser (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Newton. Oxford University Press
    This chapter looks at Euler’s relation to Newton, and at his role in the rise of ‘Newtonian’ mechanics. It aims to give a sense of Newton’s complicated legacy for Enlightenment science, and to raise awareness that some key ‘Newtonian’ results really come from Euler.
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  20.  69
    Marius Stan (forthcoming). Newton's Concepts of Force Among the Leibnizians. In Mordechai Feingold (ed.), The Reception of Newton in Europe. Cambridge University Press
    I argue that the key dynamical concepts and laws of Newton's Principia never gained a solid foothold in Germany before Kant in the 1750s. I explain this absence as due to Leibniz. Thus I make a case for a robust Leibnizian legacy for Enlightenment science, and I solve what Jonathan Israel called “a meaningful historical problem on its own,” viz. the slow and hesitant reception of Newton in pre-Kantian Germany.
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  21.  41
    Koenraad Johan van Vlaenderen, Classical Electrodynamics in Agreement with Newton’s Third Law of Motion.
    The force law of Maxwell’s classical electrodynamics does not agree with Newton’s third law of motion (N3LM), in case of open circuit magnetostatics. Initially, a generalized magnetostatics theory is presented that includes two additional physical fields B_Φ and B_l, defined by scalar functions. The scalar magnetic field B_l mediates a longitudinal Ampère force that balances the transverse Ampère force (aka the magnetic field force), such that the sum of the two forces agrees with N3LM for all stationary current distributions. (...)
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  22. Marius Stan (2015). Absolute Space and the Riddle of Rotation: Kant’s Response to Newton. Oxford Studies in Early Modern Philosophy 7.
    Newton had a fivefold argument that true motion must be motion in absolute space, not relative to matter. Like Newton, Kant holds that bodies have true motions. Unlike him, though, Kant takes all motion to be relative to matter, not to space itself. Thus, he must respond to Newton’s argument above. I reconstruct here Kant’s answer in detail. I prove that Kant addresses just one part of Newton’s case, namely, his “argument from the effects” (...)
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  23.  57
    Hylarie Kochiras (2009). Gravity and Newton's Substance Counting Problem. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science 40 (3):267-280.
    A striking feature of Newton’s thought is the very broad reach of his empiricism, potentially extending even to immaterial substances, including God, minds, and should one exist, a non-perceiving immaterial medium. Yet Newton is also drawn to certain metaphysical principles—most notably the principle that matter cannot act where it is not—and this second, rationalist feature of his thought is most pronounced in his struggle to discover ‘gravity’s cause’. The causal problem remains vexing, for he neither invokes primary causation, (...)
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  24.  20
    Eric Schliesser (2011). Newton's Substance Monism, Distant Action, and the Nature of Newton's Empiricism: Discussion of H. Kochiras “Gravity and Newton's Substance Counting Problem”. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 42 (1):160-166.
    This paper is a critical response to Hylarie Kochiras’ “Gravity and Newton’s substance counting problem,” Studies in History and Philosophy of Science 40 267–280. First, the paper argues that Kochiras conflates substances and beings; it proceeds to show that Newton is a substance monist. The paper argues that on methodological grounds Newton has adequate resources to respond to the metaphysical problems diagnosed by Kochiras. Second, the paper argues against the claim that Newton is committed to two (...)
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  25.  15
    H. Kochiras, Newton on Matter and Space in De Gravitatione Et Aequipondio Fluidorum.
    This paper explicates the concepts of matter and space that Newton develops in De gravitatione. As I interpret Newton’s account of created substances, bodies are constructed from qualities alone, as configured by God. Although regions of space and then “determined quantities of extension” appear to replace the Aristotelian substrate by functioning as property-bearers, they actually serve only as logical subjects. An implication of the interpretation I develop is that only space is extended by having parts (...)
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  26. Joshua Anderson (2012). Huey P. Newton and the Radicalization of the Urban Poor. In Leonard R. Koos (ed.), Hidden Cities: Understanding Urban Popcultures. Inter-Disciplinary Press
    Huey P. Newton, founder of the Black Panther Party, is perhaps one of the most interesting and intriguing American intellectuals from the last half of the 20th century. Newton’s genius rested in his ability to amalgamate and synthesize others’ thinking, and then reinterpreting and making it relevant to the situation that existed in the United States in his time, particularly for African-Americans in the densely populated urban centers in the North and West. Newton saw himself continuing the (...)
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  27.  95
    Eric Schliesser (2011). Newton's Challenge to Philosophy: A Programmatic Essay. Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 1 (1):101-128.
    I identify a set of interlocking views that became (and still are) very influential within philosophy in the wake of Newton’s success. These views use the authority of natural philosophy/mechanics to settle debates within philosophy. I label these “Newton’s Challenge.”.
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  28.  64
    Edward Slowik (2013). Newton's Neo-Platonic Ontology of Space. Foundations of Science 18 (3):419-448.
    This paper investigates Newton’s ontology of space in order to determine its commitment, if any, to both Cambridge neo-Platonism, which posits an incorporeal basis for space, and substantivalism, which regards space as a form of substance or entity. A non-substantivalist interpretation of Newton’s theory has been famously championed by Howard Stein and Robert DiSalle, among others, while both Stein and the early work of J. E. McGuire have downplayed the influence of Cambridge neo-Platonism on various (...)
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  29.  12
    Raffaele Pisano & Paolo Bussotti (2014). Newton’s Philosophiae Naturalis Principia Mathematica "Jesuit" Edition: The Tenor of a Huge Work. Rendiconti Accademia Dei Lincei Matematica E Applicazioni 25 (4):413-444.
    This paper has the aim to provide a general view of the so called Jesuit Edition (hereafter JE) of Newton’s Philosophiae Naturalis Principia Mathematica (1739–1742). This edition was conceived to explain all Newton’s methods through an apparatus of notes and commentaries. Every Newton’s proposition is annotated. Because of this, the text – in four volumes – is one of the most important documents to understand Newton’s way of reasoning. This edition is well known, but systematic (...)
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  30.  11
    Raffaele Pisano & Paolo Bussotti (2014). On the Jesuit Edition of Newton’s Principia. Science and Advanced Researches in the Western Civilization. Advances in Historical Studies 3 (1):33-55.
    In this research, we present the most important characteristics of the so called and so much explored Jesuit Edition of Newton’s Philosophi? Naturalis Principia Mathematica edited by Thomas Le Seur and Fran?ois Jacquier in the 1739-1742. The edition, densely annotated by the commentators (the notes and the comments are longer than Newton’s text itself) is a very treasure concerning Newton’s ideas and his heritage, e.g., Newton’s geometry and mathematical physics. Conspicuous pieces of information as to history (...)
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  31.  59
    Edward Slowik (2009). Newton's Metaphysics of Space: A “Tertium Quid” Betwixt Substantivalism and Relationism, or Merely a “God of the Gaps”? Perspectives on Science 17 (4):pp. 429-456.
    This paper investigates the question of, and the degree to which, Newton’s theory of space constitutes a third-way between the traditional substantivalist and relationist ontologies, i.e., that Newton judged that space is neither a type of substance/entity nor purely a relation among such substances. A non-substantivalist reading of Newton has been famously defended by Howard Stein, among others; but, as will be demonstrated, these claims are problematic on various grounds, especially as regards Newton’s alleged (...)
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  32.  67
    Nicholas Maxwell (2014). Three Criticisms of Newton’s Inductive Argument in the Principia. Advances in Historical Studies 3 (1):2-11.
    In this paper, I discuss how Newton’s inductive argument of the Principia can be defended against criticisms levelled against it by Duhem, Popper and myself. I argue that Duhem’s and Popper’s criticisms can be countered, but mine cannot. It requires that we reconsider, not just Newton’s inductive argument in the Principia, but also the nature of science more generally. The methods of science, whether conceived along inductivist or hypothetico-deductivist lines, make implicit metaphysical presuppositions which rigour requires we make (...)
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    Steffen Ducheyne (2009). Understanding (in) Newton's Argument for Universal Gravitation. Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 40 (2):227 - 258.
    In this essay, I attempt to assess Henk de Regt and Dennis Dieks recent pragmatic and contextual account of scientific understanding on the basis of an important historical case-study: understanding in Newton’s theory of universal gravitation and Huygens’ reception of universal gravitation. It will be shown that de Regt and Dieks’ Criterion for the Intelligibility of a Theory (CIT), which stipulates that the appropriate combination of scientists’ skills and intelligibility-enhancing theoretical virtues is a condition for scientific understanding, is too (...)
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  34. J. E. McGuire & Edward Slowik (2012). Newton's Ontology of Omnipresence and Infinite Space. Oxford Studies in Early Modern Philosophy 6.
    This essay explores the role of God’s omnipresence in Newton’s natural philosophy, with special emphasis placed on how God is related to space. Unlike Descartes’ conception, which denies the spatiality of God, or Gassendi and Charleton’s view, which regards God as completely whole in every part of space, it is argued that Newton accepts spatial extension as a basic aspect of God’s omnipresence. The historical background to Newton’s spatial ontology assumes a large part of our (...)
     
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  35.  83
    Quayshawn Spencer (2004). Do Newton's Rules of Reasoning Guarantee Truth ... Must They? Studies in History and Philosophy of Science 35 (4):759-782.
    Newton’s Principia introduces four rules of reasoning for natural philosophy. Although useful, there is a concern about whether Newton’s rules guarantee truth. After redirecting the discussion from truth to validity, I show that these rules are valid insofar as they fulfill Goodman’s criteria for inductive rules and Newton’s own methodological program of experimental philosophy; provided that cross-checks are used prior to applications of rule 4 and immediately after applications of rule 2 the following activities are pursued: (1) (...)
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  36.  8
    Patrick J. Connolly (2014). Newton and God's Sensorium. Intellectual History Review 24 (2):185-201.
    In the Queries to the Latin version of the Opticks Newton claims that space is God’s sensorium. Although these passages are well-known, few commentators have offered interpretations of what Newton might have meant by these cryptic remarks. As is well known, Leibniz was quick to pounce on these passages as evidence that Newton held untenable or nonsensical views in metaphysics and theology. Subsequent commentators have largely agreed. This paper has two goals. The first is to offer a (...)
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  37.  13
    Steffen Ducheyne & Erik Weber (2007). The Concept of Causation in Newton's Mechanical and Optical Work. Logic and Logical Philosophy 16 (4):265-288.
    In this essay the authors explore the nature of efficient causal explanation in Newton’s "Principia and The Opticks". It is argued that: (1) In the dynamical explanations of the Principia, Newton treats the phenomena under study as cases of Hall’s second kind of atypical causation. The underlying concept of causation is therefore a purely interventionist one. (2) In the descriptions of his optical experiments, Newton treats the phenomena under study as cases of Hall’s typical (...). The underlying concept of causation is therefore a mixed interventionist/mechanicist one. (shrink)
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  38.  39
    Edward Slowik (2011). Newton, the Parts of Space, and the Holism of Spatial Ontology. Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 1 (2):249-272.
    This article investigates the problem of the identity of the parts of space in Newton’s natural philosophy, as well as the holistic or structuralist nature of Newton’s ontology of space. Additionally, this article relates the lessons reached in this historical and philosophical investigation to analogous debates in contemporary space-time ontology. While previous contributions, by Nerlich, Huggett, and others, have proven to be informative in evaluating Newton’s claims, it will be argued that the underlying goals of Newton’s (...)
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  39.  27
    Liam P. Dempsey (2011). 'A Compound Wholly Mortal' : Locke and Newton on the Metaphysics of (Personal) Immortality. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 19 (2):241-264.
    In this paper I consider a cluster of positions which depart from the immortalist and dualist anthropologies of Rene Descartes and Henry More. In particular, I argue that John Locke and Isaac Newton are attracted to a monistic mind-body metaphysics, which while resisting neat characterization, occupies a conceptual space distinct from the dualism of the immortalists, on the one hand, and thoroughgoing materialism of Thomas Hobbes, on the other. They propound a sort of property monism: mind and body are (...)
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  40.  20
    Patrick J. Connolly (2015). Space Before God? A Problem in Newton's Metaphysics. Philosophy 90 (1):83-106.
    My goal in this paper is to elucidate a problematic feature of Newton's metaphysics of absolute space. Specifically, I argue that Newton's theory has the untenable consequence that God depends on space for His existence and is therefore not an independent entity. I argue for this conclusion in stages. First, I show that Newton believed that space was an entity and that God and space were ontologically distinct entities. Part of this involves arguing that Newton denies (...)
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  41.  43
    Ori Belkind (2013). Leibniz and Newton on Space. Foundations of Science 18 (3):467-497.
    This paper reexamines the historical debate between Leibniz and Newton on the nature of space. According to the traditional reading, Leibniz (in his correspondence with Clarke) produced metaphysical arguments (relying on the Principle of Sufficient Reason and the Principle of Identity of Indiscernibles) in favor of a relational account of space. Newton, according to the traditional account, refuted the metaphysical arguments with the help of an empirical argument based on the bucket experiment. The paper claims that Leibniz’s and (...)
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  42.  22
    Chunghyoung Lee (2011). Infinity and Newton's Three Laws of Motion. Foundations of Physics 41 (12):1810-1828.
    It is shown that the following three common understandings of Newton’s laws of motion do not hold for systems of infinitely many components. First, Newton’s third law, or the law of action and reaction, is universally believed to imply that the total sum of internal forces in a system is always zero. Several examples are presented to show that this belief fails to hold for infinite systems. Second, two of these examples are of an infinitely divisible continuous body (...)
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  43.  34
    Marius Stan (2012). Newton and Wolff. Southern Journal of Philosophy 50 (3):459-481.
    Newton rested his theory of mechanics on distinct metaphysical and epistemological foundations. After Leibniz's death in 1716, the Principia ran into sharp philosophical opposition from Christian Wolff and his disciples, who sought to subvert Newton's foundations or replace them with Leibnizian ideas. In what follows, I chronicle some of the Wolffians' reactions to Newton's notion of absolute space, his dynamical laws of motion, and his general theory of gravitation. I also touch on arguments advanced by Newton's (...)
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  44.  16
    Liam P. Dempsey (2006). Written in the Flesh: Isaac Newton on the Mind–Body Relation. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 37 (3):420-441.
    Isaac Newton’s views on the mind–body relation are of interest not only because of their somewhat unique departure from popular early modern conceptions of mind and its relation to body, but also because of their connections with other aspects of Newton’s thought. In this paper I argue that (1) Newton accepted an interesting sort of mind–body monism, one which defies neat categorization, but which clearly departs from Cartesian substance dualism, and (2) Newton took the power by (...)
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  45.  32
    Andrew Janiak (2013). Metaphysics and Natural Philosophy in Descartes and Newton. Foundations of Science 18 (3):403-417.
    This paper compares Newton’s and Descartes’s conceptions of the complex relationship between physics and metaphysics.
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  46.  16
    Hylarie Kochiras (2013). The Mechanical Philosophy and Newton's Mechanical Force. Philosophy of Science 80 (4):557-578.
    How does Newton approach the challenge of mechanizing gravity and, more broadly, natural philosophy? By adopting the simple machine tradition’s mathematical approach to a system’s co-varying parameters of change, he retains natural philosophy’s traditional goal while specifying it in a novel way as the search for impressed forces. He accordingly understands the physical world as a divinely created machine possessing intrinsically mathematical features, and mathematical methods as capable of identifying its real features. The gravitational force’s physical cause remains an (...)
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    Francisco Caruso & R. Moreira Xavier (1998). Sull'influenza di Cartesio, Leibniz e Newton nel primo approccio di Kant al problema dello spazio e della sua dimensionalita. Epistemologia 21 (2):211-224.
    L'idea di relazionare la dimensionalità dello spazio ad una legge fisica, contenuta nel primo scritto di Kant "Pensieri sulla veridica estima delle forze vive", svela un modo di guardare i rapporti tra Fisica e Matematica così nuovo ed originale che potè essere sviluppato e compreso nella sua plenitudine soltanto nel secolo XX. Ci riferiamo qui ala prospettiva aperta da Ehrenfest nel suo "In what way does it become manifest in the fundamental laws of physics that space has three dimensions?". (...)
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  48.  23
    Joshua Anderson (2012). A Tension in the Political Thought of Huey P. Newton. Journal of African American Studies 16 (2):249-267.
    This article is a discussion of the political thought of Huey P. Newton, and by extension, the theory and practice of the Black Panther Party. More specifically, this article will explore a tension that exists between Newton's theory of Intercommunalism and the Black Panther Party Platform. To that end, there is, first, a discussion of the ideological development of the Black Panther Party, which culminated in Newton's theory of Intercommunalism. Second, there is a presentation of what will (...)
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  49. Kenneth R. Westphal (2011). Kant’s Cognitive Semantics, Newton’s Rule Four of Philosophy and Scientific Realism. Bulletin of the Hegel Society of Great Britain 63:27-49.
    Kant’s Critique of Pure Reason contains an original and powerful semantics of singular cognitive reference which has important implications for epistemology and for philosophy of science. Here I argue that Kant’s semantics directly and strongly supports Newton’s Rule 4 of Philosophy in ways which support Newton’s realism about gravitational force. I begin with Newton’s Rule 4 of Philosophy and its role in Newton’s justification of realism about gravitational force (§2). Next I briefly summarize Kant’s semantics of (...)
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  50.  9
    Hylarie Kochiras (2013). Causal Language and the Structure of Force in Newton's System of the World. Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 3 (2):210-235.
    Although Newton carefully eschews questions about gravity’s causal basis in the published Principia, the original version of his masterwork’s third book contains some intriguing causal language. “These forces,” he writes, “arise from the universal nature of matter.” Such remarks seem to assert knowledge of gravity’s cause, even that matter is capable of robust and distant action. Some commentators defend that interpretation of the text—a text whose proper interpretation is important since Newton’s reasons for suppressing it strongly suggest that (...)
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