Search results for 'Ventral Stream' (try it on Scholar)

964 found
Sort by:
  1. Karsten Specht (2013). Mapping a Lateralization Gradient Within the Ventral Stream for Auditory Speech Perception. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 240.0
    Recent models on speech perception propose a dual stream processing network, with a dorsal stream, extending from the posterior temporal lobe of the left hemisphere through inferior parietal areas into the left inferior frontal gyrus, and a ventral stream that is assumed to originate in the primary auditory cortex in the upper posterior part of the temporal lobe and to extend towards the anterior part of the temporal lobe, where it may connect to the ventral (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Albert Postma, Rob van der Lubbe & Sander Zuidhoek (2001). The Ventral Stream Offers More Affordance and the Dorsal Stream More Memory Than Believed. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (1):115-116.score: 180.0
    Opposed to Norman's proposal, processing of affordance is likely to occur not solely in the dorsal stream but also in the ventral stream. Moreover, the dorsal stream might do more than just serve an important role in motor actions. It supports egocentric location coding as well. As such, it would possess a form of representational memory, contrary to Norman's proposal.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Marcelo L. Berthier, Seán Froudist Walsh, Guadalupe Dávila, Alejandro Nabrozidis, Rocio Juarez Y. Ruiz de Mier, Antonio Gutiérrez, Irene De Torres, Francisco Alfaro, Natalia García-Casares & Rafael Ruiz-Cruces (2013). Dissociated Repetition Deficits in Aphasia Can Reflect Flexible Interactions Between Left Dorsal and Ventral Streams and Gender-Dimorphic Architecture of the Right Dorsal Stream. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7:873.score: 172.0
    Assessment of brain-damaged subjects presenting with dissociated repetition deficits after selective injury to either the left dorsal or ventral auditory pathways can provide further insight on their respective roles in verbal repetition. We evaluated repetition performance and its neural correlates using multimodal imaging (anatomical MRI, DTI, fMRI and 18FDG-PET) in a female patient with transcortical motor aphasia (TCMA) and in a male patient with conduction aphasia (CA) who had small contiguous but non-overlapping left perisylvian infarctions. Repetition in the TCMA (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Digby Elliott, Luc Tremblay & Timothy N. Welsh (2001). A Fast Ventral Stream or Early Dorsal-Ventral Interactions? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (1):105-105.score: 156.0
    Several lines of evidence indicate that rapid target-aiming movements, involving both the eyes and hand, can be biased by the visual context in which the movements are performed. Some of these contextual influences carry-over from trial to trial. This research indicates that dissociation between the dorsal and ventral systems based on speed, conscious awareness, and frame of reference is far from clear.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Britt Anderson & David L. Sheinberg (2010). Neurophysiology of Temporal Orienting in Ventral Visual Stream. In Anna C. Nobre & Jennifer T. Coull (eds.), Attention and Time. Oup Oxford. 407.score: 120.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Op De Beeck Hans (2012). Representations of Face Identity Information in Ventral Visual Stream Using Multi-Voxel Analyses. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 120.0
  7. Y. Rossetti (2010). Why Does the Perception-Action Functional Dichotomy Not Match the Ventral-Dorsal Streams in Anatomical Segregation: Optic Ataxia and the Function of the Dorsal Stream. In Nivedita Gangopadhyay, Michael Madary & Finn Spicer (eds.), Perception, Action, and Consciousness: Sensorimotor Dynamics and Two Visual Systems. Oup Oxford.score: 120.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Berit Brogaard (2011). Conscious Vision for Action Versus Unconscious Vision for Action? Cognitive Science 35 (6):1076-1104.score: 84.0
    David Milner and Melvyn Goodale’s dissociation hypothesis is commonly taken to state that there are two functionally specialized cortical streams of visual processing originating in striate (V1) cortex: a dorsal, action-related “unconscious” stream and a ventral, perception-related “conscious” stream. As Milner and Goodale acknowledge, findings from blindsight studies suggest a more sophisticated picture that replaces the distinction between unconscious vision for action and conscious vision for perception with a tripartite division between unconscious vision for action, conscious vision (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Robert Briscoe & John Schwenkler (forthcoming). Conscious Vision in Action. Cognitive Science.score: 66.0
    Conscious visual experience is a source of fine-grained and highly accurate information about the spatial properties of nearby objects. It is thus natural to assume that the spatial information present in visual experience is often used for purposes of intentional, object-directed visuomotor control. Yet this assumption, which we here call the Control Thesis, has been criticized on empirical grounds by proponents of the Two Visual Systems Hypothesis (TVSH) [Clark 2007, 2009; Goodale & Milner 1992, 2004a, 2008; Milner & Goodale 1995/2006]. (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Berit Brogaard (2011). Are There Unconscious Perceptual Processes? Consciousness and Cognition 20 (2):449-63.score: 66.0
    Blindsight and vision for action seem to be exemplars of unconscious visual processes. However, researchers have recently argued that blindsight is not really a kind of uncon- scious vision but is rather severely degraded conscious vision. Morten Overgaard and col- leagues have recently developed new methods for measuring the visibility of visual stimuli. Studies using these methods show that reported clarity of visual stimuli correlates with accuracy in both normal individuals and blindsight patients. Vision for action has also come under (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Robert Briscoe (2009). Egocentric Spatial Representation in Action and Perception. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 79 (2):423 - 460.score: 60.0
    Neuropsychological findings used to motivate the "two visual systems" hypothesis have been taken to endanger a pair of widely accepted claims about spatial representation in conscious visual experience. The first is the claim that visual experience represents 3-D space around the perceiver using an egocentric frame of reference. The second is the claim that there is a constitutive link between the spatial contents of visual experience and the perceiver's bodily actions. In this paper, I review and assess three main sources (...)
    Direct download (15 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Michael Madary (2011). The Dorsal Stream and the Visual Horizon. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 10 (4):423-438.score: 60.0
    Today many philosophers of mind accept that the two cortical streams of visual processing in humans can be distinguished in terms of conscious experience. The ventral stream is thought to produce representations that may become conscious, and the dorsal stream is thought to handle unconscious vision for action. Despite a vast literature on the topic of the two streams, there is currently no account of the way in which the relevant empirical evidence could fit with basic Husserlian (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. George J. Andersen (2001). Are the Dorsal/Ventral Pathways Sufficiently Distinct to Resolve Perceptual Theory? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (1):96-97.score: 60.0
    The author argues that the theory of a dorsal/ventral stream for visual processing can be used to reconcile the constructivist and direct perception theories. My commentary discusses neurophysiological and psychophysical studies that run counter to the view. In addition, the central issue of debate between the constructionist and direct perception approaches regarding what is visual information is discussed.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. G. Hickok & D. Poeppel (2003). Dorsal and Ventral Streams: A Framework for Understanding Aspects of the Functional Anatomy of Language. Cognition 92 (1-2):67-99.score: 60.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Susan M. Rivera Faraz Farzin (2010). Dynamic Object Representations in Infants with and Without Fragile X Syndrome. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 4.score: 54.0
    Our visual world is dynamic in nature. The ability to encode, mentally represent, and track an object’s identity as it moves across time and space is critical for integrating and maintaining a complete and coherent view of the world. Here we investigated dynamic object processing in typically developing (TD) infants and infants with fragile X syndrome (FXS), a single-gene disorder associated with deficits in dorsal stream functioning. We used the violation of expectation method to assess infants’ visual response to (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Franco Lepore Johannes Frasnelli, Johan N. Lundström, Veronika Schöpf, Simona Negoias, Thomas Hummel (2012). Dual Processing Streams in Chemosensory Perception. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 52.0
    Higher order sensory processing follows a general subdivision into a ventral and a dorsal stream for visual, auditory, and tactile information. Object identification is processed in temporal structures (ventral stream), whereas object localization leads to activation of parietal structures (dorsal stream). To examine whether the chemical senses demonstrate a similar dissociation, we investigated odor identification and odor localization in 16 healthy young subjects using functional MRI. We used two odors (1. eucalyptol; 2. a mixture of (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Gross Joachim (2011). Neural Dynamics of Anticipatory Spatial Attention and its Influence on Perception: The Role of Alpha-Band Modulations in the Dorsal and Ventral Visual Streams. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 5.score: 50.0
  18. Sébastien M. Crouzet Maxime Cauchoix (2013). How Plausible is a Subcortical Account of Rapid Visual Recognition? Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 48.0
    How plausible is a subcortical account of rapid visual recognition?
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Wayne Wu (2014). Against Division: Consciousness, Information and the Visual Streams. Mind and Language 29 (4):383-406.score: 44.0
    Milner and Goodale's influential account of the primate cortical visual streams involves a division of consciousness between them, for it is the ventral stream that has the responsibility for visual consciousness. Hence, the dorsal visual stream is a ‘zombie’ stream. In this article, I argue that certain information carried by the dorsal stream likely plays a central role in the egocentric spatial content of experience, especially the experience of visual spatial constancy. Thus, the dorsal (...) contributes to a pervasive feature of consciousness. (shrink)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Gordon Binsted & Les G. Carlton (2001). When is Movement Controlled by the Dorsal Stream? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (1):97-98.score: 36.0
    Our commentary focuses on the functional link between the ventral and dorsal systems implied by Norman, as they relate to overt movement. While issues relating to space perception and size constancy are the primary justification for this dual-process theory, the philosophical extensions of this approach are less consistent with examination of motor control and, in particular, motor learning.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Steven L. Small Nira Mashal, Ana Solodkin, Anthony Steven Dick, E. Elinor Chen (2012). A Network Model of Observation and Imitation of Speech. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 36.0
    Much evidence has now accumulated demonstrating and quantifying the extent of shared regional brain activation for observation and execution of speech. However, the nature of the actual networks that implement these functions, i.e., both the brain regions and the connections among them, and the similarities and differences across these networks has not been elucidated. The current study aims to characterize formally a network for observation and imitation of syllables in the healthy adult brain and to compare their structure and effective (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Thomas Weiss Sandra Preißler, Caroline Dietrich, Kathrin R. Blume, Gunther O. Hofmann, Wolfgang H. R. Miltner (2013). Plasticity in the Visual System is Associated with Prosthesis Use in Phantom Limb Pain. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 36.0
    The experience of strong phantom limb pain (PLP) in arm amputees was previously shown to be associated with structural neural plasticity in parts of the cortex that belong to dorsal and ventral visual streams. It has been speculated that this plasticity results from the extensive use of a functional prosthesis which is associated with increased visual feedback to control the artificial hand. To test this hypothesis, we reanalyzed data of cortical volumes of 21 upper limb amputees and tested the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Mel Goodale (1997). Pointing the Way to a Unified Theory of Action and Perception. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (4):749-750.score: 30.0
    Deictic coding offers a useful model for understanding the interactions between the dorsal and ventral streams of visual processing in the cerebral cortex. By extending Ballard et al.'s ideas on teleassistance, I show how dedicated low-level visuomotor processes in the dorsal stream might be engaged for the services of high-level cognitive operations in the ventral stream.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Melvyn A. Goodale & Jonathan S. Cant (2007). Coming to Grips with Vision and Touch. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (2):209-210.score: 30.0
    Dijkerman & de Haan (D&dH) propose a convincing model of somatosensory organization that is inspired by earlier perception-action models of the visual system. In this commentary, we suggest that the dorsal and ventral visual streams both contribute to the control of action, but in different ways. Using the example of grip and load force calibration, we show how the ventral stream can invoke stored information about the material properties of objects originally derived from the somatosensory system.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Melvyn A. Goodale (2001). Real Action in a Virtual World. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (5):984-985.score: 30.0
    O'Regan & Noë run into some difficulty in trying to reconcile their “seeing as acting” proposal with the perception and action account of the functions of the two streams of visual projections in the primate cerebral cortex. I suggest that part of the problem is their reluctance to acknowledge that the mechanisms in the ventral stream may play a more critical role in visual awareness and qualia than mechanisms in the dorsal stream.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. William M. Mace (2001). The Primacy of Ecological Realism. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (1):111-111.score: 30.0
    Whether or not the correspondence of dorsal stream functions to Gibsonian ecological psychology and the ventral stream functions to “constructivism” hold up, the overall goal of capturing a pragmatic realism should not be forgotten.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. H. Chris Dijkerman, A. David Milner & D. P. Carey (1998). Grasping Spatial Relationships: Failure to Demonstrate Allocentric Visual Coding in a Patient with Visual Form Agnosia. Consciousness and Cognition 7 (3):424-437.score: 30.0
    The cortical visual mechanisms involved in processing spatial relationships remain subject to debate. According to one current view, the ''dorsal stream'' of visual areas, emanating from primary visual cortex and culminating in the posterior parietal cortex, mediates this aspect of visual processing. More recently, others have argued that while the dorsal stream provides egocentric coding of visual location for motor control, the separate ''ventral'' stream is needed for allocentric spatial coding. We have assessed the visual form (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Melvyn A. Goodale & A. David Milner (2004). Plans for Action. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (1):37-40.score: 30.0
    It is our contention that the concept of planning in Glover's model is too broadly defined, encompassing both action/goal selection and the programming of the constituent movements required to acquire the goal. We argue that this monolithic view of planning is untenable on neuropsychological, neurophysiological, and behavioural grounds. The evidence demands instead that a distinction be made between action planning and the specification of the initial kinematic parameters, with the former depending on processing in the ventral stream and (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Duje Tadin, Peiyan Wong, Michael W. Mebane, Michael J. Berkowitz, Hollister Trott & Sohee Park (2005). Believing is Seeing in Schizophrenia: The Role of Top-Down Processing. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (6):775-775.score: 30.0
    The etiology of visual hallucinations is largely undetermined in schizophrenia. Collerton et al.'s PAD model partly concurs with what we know about neurocognition in schizophrenia, but we need to specify the types of perceptual and attentional abnormalities that are implicated in recurrent complex visual hallucinations (RCVH). Available data suggest that abnormal attentional control and top-down processing play a larger role than the ventral stream deficits.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Jonathan Polimeni & Eric Schwartz (2002). Neural Representation of Sensory Data. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (2):207-208.score: 30.0
    In the target article Pylyshyn revives the spectre of the “little green man,” arguing for a largely symbolic representation of visual imagery. To clarify this problem, we provide precise definitions of the key term “picture,” present some examples of our definition, and outline an information-theoretic analysis suggesting that the problem of addressing data in the brain requires a partially analogue and partially symbolic solution. This is made concrete in the ventral stream of object recognition, from V1 to IT (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. M. Mur, M. Meys, J. Bodurka, R. Goebel, P. A. Bandettini & N. Kriegeskorte (2012). Human Object-Similarity Judgments Reflect and Transcend the Primate-IT Object Representation. Frontiers in Psychology 4:128-128.score: 30.0
    Primate inferior temporal (IT) cortex is thought to contain a high-level representation of objects at the interface between vision and semantics. This suggests that the perceived similarity of real-world objects might be predicted from the IT representation. Here we show that objects that elicit similar activity patterns in human IT tend to be judged as similar by humans. The IT representation explained the human judgments better than early visual cortex, other ventral stream regions, and a range of computational (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Simon J. Thorpe Sébastien M. Crouzet (2011). Low-Level Cues and Ultra-Fast Face Detection. Frontiers in Psychology 2.score: 30.0
    Recent experimental work has demonstrated the existence of extremely rapid saccades towards faces in natural scenes that can be initiated only 100 ms after image onset (Crouzet, Kirchner, & Thorpe, 2010). These ultra-rapid saccades constitute a major challenge to current models of processing in the visual system because they do not seem to leave enough time for even a single feed-forward pass through the ventral stream. Here we explore the possibility that the information required to trigger these very (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. M. Husain & P. Nachev (2007). Space and the Parietal Cortex. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 11 (1):30-36.score: 30.0
    Current views of the parietal cortex have difficulty accommodating the human inferior parietal lobe (IPL) within a simple dorsal versus ventral stream dichotomy. In humans, lesions of the right IPL often lead to syndromes such as hemispatial neglect that are seemingly in accord with the proposal that this region has a crucial role in spatial processing. However, recent imaging and lesion studies have revealed that inferior parietal regions have non-spatial functions, such as in sustaining attention, detecting salient events (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Allan L. Reiss Brian W. Haas (2012). Social Brain Development in Williams Syndrome: The Current Status and Directions for Future Research. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 30.0
    Williams syndrome (WS) is a neurodevelopmental condition that occurs as a result of a contiguous deletion of ∼26-28 genes on chromosome 7q11.23. WS is often associated with a distinctive social phenotype characterized by an increased affinity toward processing faces, reduced sensitivity to fear related social stimuli and a reduced ability to form concrete social relationships. Understanding the biological mechanisms that underlie the social phenotype in WS may elucidate genetic and neural factors influencing the typical development of the social brain. In (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Guido Gainotti (2012). Brain Structures Playing a Crucial Role in the Representation of Tools in Humans and Non-Human Primates. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (4):224-225.score: 30.0
    The cortical representation of concepts varies according to the information critical for their development. Living categories, being mainly based upon visual information, are bilaterally represented in the rostral parts of the ventral stream of visual processing; whereas tools, being mainly based upon action data, are unilaterally represented in a left-sided fronto-parietal network. The unilateral representation of tools results from involvement in actions of the right side of the body.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Emmanuel J. Barbeau Gladys Barragan-Jason, Gabriel Besson, Mathieu Ceccaldi (2013). Fast and Famous: Looking for the Fastest Speed at Which a Face Can Be Recognized. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 30.0
    Face recognition is supposed to be fast. However, the actual speed at which faces can be recognized remains unknown. To address this issue, we report two experiments run with speed constraints. In both experiments, famous faces had to be recognized among unknown ones using a large set of stimuli to prevent preactivation of features which would speed up recognition. In the first experiment (31 participants), recognition of famous faces was investigated using a go/no-go task. In the second experiment, 101 participants (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Guy A. Orban (2013). Which Animal Model for Understanding Human Navigation in a Three-Dimensional World? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (5):558-559.score: 30.0
    Single-cell studies of monkey posterior parietal cortex (PPC) have revealed the extensive neuronal representations of three-dimensional subject motion and three-dimensional layout of the environment. I propose that navigational planning integrates this PPC information, including gravity signals, with horizontal-plane based information provided by the hippocampal formation, modified in primates by expansion of the ventral stream.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Barry F. Dainton (2000). Stream of Consciousness: Unity and Continuity in Conscious Experience. Routledge.score: 24.0
    Stream of Consciousness is about the phenomenology of conscious experience. Barry Dainton shows us that stream of consciousness is not a mosaic of discrete fragments of experience, but rather an interconnected flowing whole. Through a deep probing into the nature of awareness, introspection, phenomenal space and time consciousness, Dainton offers a truly original understanding of the nature of consciousness.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Athanasios Raftopoulos (2009). Reference, Perception, and Attention. Philosophical Studies 144 (3):339 - 360.score: 24.0
    I examine John Campbell’s claim that the determination of the reference of a perceptual demonstrative requires conscious visual object-based selective attention. I argue that although Campbell’s claim to the effect that, first, a complex binding parameter is needed to establish the referent of a perceptual demonstrative, and, second, that this referent is determined independently of, and before, the application of sortals is correct, this binding parameter does not require object-based attention for its construction. If object-based attention were indeed required then (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Nivedita Gangopadhyay, Michael Madary & Finn Spicer (eds.) (2010). Perception, Action, and Consciousness: Sensorimotor Dynamics and Two Visual Systems. Oxford University Press, Usa.score: 24.0
    Machine generated contents note: -- 1. Introduction -- Consciousness and Sensorimotor Dynamics: Methodological Issues -- 2. Computational consciousness, D. Ballard -- 3. Explaining what people say about sensory qualia, J. Kevin O'Regan -- 4. Perception, action, and experience: unraveling the golden braid, A. Clark -- The Two-Visual Systems Hypothesis -- 5. Cortical visual systems for perception and action, A.D. Milner and M.A. Goodale -- 6. Hermann Lotze's Theory of 'Local Sign': evidence from pointing responses in an illusory figure, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Daniel Collerton, Elaine Perry & Ian McKeith (2005). Why People See Things That Are Not There: A Novel Perception and Attention Deficit Model for Recurrent Complex Visual Hallucinations. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (6):737-757.score: 24.0
    As many as two million people in the United Kingdom repeatedly see people, animals, and objects that have no objective reality. Hallucinations on the border of sleep, dementing illnesses, delirium, eye disease, and schizophrenia account for 90% of these. The remainder have rarer disorders. We review existing models of recurrent complex visual hallucinations (RCVH) in the awake person, including cortical irritation, cortical hyperexcitability and cortical release, top-down activation, misperception, dream intrusion, and interactive models. We provide evidence that these can neither (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Kristjan Laasik (2014). Constitutive Strata and the Dorsal Stream. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 13 (3):419-435.score: 24.0
    In his paper, “The Dorsal Stream and the Visual Horizon,” Michael Madary argues that “dorsal stream processing plays a main role in the spatiotemporal limits of visual perception, in what Husserl identified as the visual horizon” (Madary 2011, p. 424). Madary regards himself as thereby providing a theoretical framework “sensitive to basic Husserlian phenomenology” (Madary 2011). In particular, Madary draws connections between perceptual anticipations and the experience of the indeterminate spatial margins, on the one hand, and the Husserlian (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Roberto Viviani (2013). Emotion Regulation, Attention to Emotion, and the Ventral Attentional Network. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 24.0
    Accounts of the effect of emotion on response and current models of emotion regulation are based on two opposed but interacting processes: automatic bottom-up processes (triggered by emotionally arousing stimuli) and top-down control processes (mapped to prefrontal cortical areas). Data on the existence of a third attentional network operating without recourse to limited-capacity processes but influencing response raise the issue of how it is integrated in emotion regulation. We summarize here data from attention to emotion, voluntary emotion regulation, and biases (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Susann Deike, Peter Heil, Martin Böckmann-Barthel & André Brechmann (2012). The Build-Up of Auditory Stream Segregation: A Different Perspective. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 24.0
    The build-up of auditory stream segregation refers to the notion that sequences of alternating A and B sounds initially tend to be heard as a single stream, but with time appear to split into separate streams. The central assumption in the analysis of this phenomenon is that streaming sequences are perceived as one stream at the beginning by default. In the present study, we test the validity of this assumption and document its impact on the apparent build-up (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Kalanit Grill-Spector Golijeh Golarai, Alina Liberman, Jennifer M. D. Yoon (2009). Differential Development of the Ventral Visual Cortex Extends Through Adolescence. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 3.score: 24.0
    The ventral temporal cortex (VTC) in humans includes functionally defined regions that preferentially respond to objects, faces, and places. Recent developmental studies suggest that the face selective region in the fusiform gyrus (‘fusiform face area’, FFA) undergoes a prolonged development involving substantial increases in its volume after age 7 years. However, the endpoint of this development is not known. Here we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to examine the development of face-, object- and place-selective regions in the VTC (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Shimon Edelman, Unsupervised Learning of Visual Structure.score: 24.0
    To learn a visual code in an unsupervised manner, one may attempt to capture those features of the stimulus set that would contribute significantly to a statistically efficient representation (as dictated, e.g., by the Minimum Description Length principle). Paradoxically, all the candidate features in this approach need to be known before statistics over them can be computed. This paradox may be circumvented by confining the repertoire of candidate features to actual scene fragments, which resemble the “what+where” receptive fields found in (...)
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Takao Fukui & Toshio Inui (2013). How Vision Affects Kinematic Properties of Pantomimed Prehension Movements. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 24.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Heinz Wimmer Philipp Ludersdorfer, Matthias Schurz, Fabio Richlan, Martin Kronbichler (2013). Opposite Effects of Visual and Auditory Word-Likeness on Activity in the Visual Word Form Area. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 24.0
    The present fMRI study investigated the effects of word-likeness of visual and auditory stimuli on activity along the ventral visual stream. In the context of a one-back task, we presented visual and auditory words, pseudowords, and artificial stimuli (i.e., false-fonts and reversed-speech, respectively). Main findings were regionally specific effects of word-likeness on activation in a left ventral occipitotemporal region corresponding to the classic localization of the Visual Word Form Area (VWFA). Specifically, we found an inverse word-likeness effect (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Yang Xu, Christopher D'Lauro, John A. Pyles, Robert E. Kass & Michael J. Tarr (2013). Fine-Grained Temporal Coding of Visually-Similar Categories in the Ventral Visual Pathway and Prefrontal Cortex. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 24.0
    Humans are remarkably proficient at categorizing visually-similar objects. To better understand the cortical basis of this categorization process, we used magnetoencephalography (MEG) to record neural activity while participants learned--with feedback--to discriminate two highly-similar, novel visual categories. We hypothesized that although prefrontal regions would mediate early category learning, this role would diminish with increasing category familiarity and that regions within the ventral visual pathway would come to play a more prominent role in encoding category-relevant information as learning progressed. Early in (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Sander M. Daselaar, Willem Huijbers, Karl Eklund, Morris Moscovitch & Roberto Cabeza (2013). Resting-State Functional Connectivity of Ventral Parietal Regions Associated with Attention Reorienting and Episodic Recollection. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 24.0
    In functional neuroimaging studies, ventral parietal cortex (VPC) is recruited by very different cognitive tasks. Explaining the contributions VPC to these tasks has become a topic of intense study and lively debate. Perception studies frequently find VPC activations during tasks involving attention-reorienting, and memory studies frequently find them during tasks involving episodic recollection. According to the Attention to Memory (AtoM) model, both phenomena can be explained by the same VPC function: bottom-up attention. Yet, a recent functional MRI (fMRI) meta-analysis (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 964