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Vere Chappell [38]Vere C. Chappell [3]
  1. Vere Chappell, Descartes’s Compatibilism.
    Compatibilism is the doctrine that the doctrine of determinism is logically consistent with the doctrine of libertarianism. Determinism is the doctrine that every being and event is brought about by causes other than itself. Libertarianism is the doctrine that some human actions are free. Was Descartes a compatibilist? There is no doubt that he was a libertarian: his works are full of professions of freedom, human as well as divine. And though he held that God has no cause other than (...)
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  2. Vere Chappell, Hoffman on Principal Attributes.
    In Principles I. 53, Descartes states what appears to be an important metaphysical principle: P1: Each substance has one principal property, which constitutes its nature and essence, and to which all its other properties are referred (AT VIIIA 25; CSM I 210).1 Marleen Rozemond calls this Descartes's "Attributes Premise", and it leads directly, as she points out, to Cartesian Dualism, the doctrine that a human mind and a human body, even when they belong to the same human being, are distinct (...)
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  3. Vere Chappell, L'homme Cartesien.
    Meditation. A man is a compositus ex mente et corpore (VII 82; II 57), a composite being consisting of a mind and a body. [Note: In parenthetical citations of Descartes's text, the first pair of numerals refers to volume and page of the Adam and Tannery edition; the second pair to volume and page of the English translation by Cottingham, Stoothoff, Murdoch, and Kenny.] These two components of a man are themselves different things. Not only are they disparate in nature, (...)
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  4. Vere Chappell, Locke on the Suspension of Desire.
    In the first edition of the Essay concerning Human Understanding, Locke claims that human beings have freedom of action - that is, that some of their actions are free - but that they do not have freedom of will - that is, that none of their volitions are free. Volitions themselves are actions for Locke; they are operations of the will and hence acts of willing. And volitions give rise to other actions: an action that follows and is caused by (...)
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  5. Vere Chappell (2007). Power in Locke's Essay. In Lex Newman (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Locke's "Essay Concerning Human Understanding". Cambridge University Press.
     
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  6. Vere Chappell (2005). Learning From Descartes, Via Bennett. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 13 (1):139 – 147.
    (2005). Learning From Descartes, Via Bennett. British Journal for the History of Philosophy: Vol. 13, No. 1, pp. 139-147. doi: 10.1080/0960878042000317636.
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  7. Vere Chappell (2005). Review of Greg Forster, John Locke's Politics of Moral Consensus. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2005 (11).
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  8. Vere Chappell (2005). Self-Determination. In Christia Mercer (ed.), Early Modern Philosophy: Mind, Matter, and Metaphysics. Oxford University Press. 127--41.
  9. Vere Chappell (2004). Comments. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 85 (3):338–355.
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  10. Vere Chappell (2004). Review: Liberty Worth the Name: Locke on Free Agency. [REVIEW] Mind 113 (450):420-424.
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  11. Vere Chappell (2004). Symposium: Locke and the Veil of Perception Preface. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 85 (3):243–244.
    This symposium comprises five papers on Locke's theory of sense perception. The authors are John Rogers, Gideon Yaffe, Lex Newman, Tom Lennon, and Martha Bolton. There are also comments on the papers, both individually and as a group, by Vere Chappell. In addition to Locke's view of perception, the papers deal with the nature of Lockean ideas and with the question whether Locke is committed to skepticism regarding the external world. The authors (and the commentator) disagree in their readings of (...)
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  12. Vere Chappell (2003). John Locke, Essay Concerning Human Understanding (1690). In Jorge J. E. Gracia, Gregory M. Reichberg & Bernard N. Schumacher (eds.), The Classics of Western Philosophy: A Reader's Guide. Blackwell Pub.. 260.
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  13. Donald Ainslie, Kate Abramson, Karl Ameriks, Elizabeth Ashford, Martin Bell, Simon Blackburn, Martha Bolton, M. A. Box, Vere Chappell & Rachel Cohan (2001). Hume Studies Referees, 2000-2001. Hume Studies 27 (2).
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  14. Vere Chappell, Dorothy Coleman, Timothy Costelloe, Lisa Downing, James Dye, Daniel Flage, R. G. Frey, James King & Beryl Logan (2001). Hume Studies Referees, 2000-2001. Hume Studies 27 (2).
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  15. Judith Boss, Giordano Bruno, Vere Chappell, John Cottingham, Peter A. Danielson, Rene Descartes, Thomas Douglas, John Finis, R. J. Hollingdale & Vittorio Hösle (1999). Boss, Judith and James M. Nuzum. Teaching Philosophy 22 (2):237.
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  16. Vere Chappell (ed.) (1999). Hobbes and Bramhall on Liberty and Necessity. Cambridge Up.
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  17. Vere Chappell (ed.) (1998). Locke. OUP Oxford.
    Oxford Readings in Philosophy -/- The aim of this series is to bring together important recent writings in major areas of philosophical inquiry, selected from a variety of sources, mostly periodicals, which may not be conveniently available to the university student or the general reader. The editors of each volume contribute an introductory essay on the items chosen and on the questions with which they deal. A selective bibliography is appended as a guide to further reading. -/- This new volume (...)
     
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  18. Vere Chappell (1997). Descartes's Ontology. Topoi 16 (2):111-127.
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  19. Vere Chappell (1996). Locke on the Freedom of Will. In G. A. J. Rogers (ed.), Locke's Philosophy: Content and Context. Clarendon Press.
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  20. Vere Chappell (1995). Free Willing: Comments on Hoffman's “Freedom and Strength of Will”. Philosophical Studies 77 (2-3):273 - 281.
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  21. Vere Chappell (1995). The Physical Basis of Predication. Review of Metaphysics 48 (3):673-674.
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  22. Wayne Waxman, Vere Chappell & G. A. J. Rogers (1995). The Cambridge Companion to Locke.Locke's Philosophy: Content and Context. Philosophical Quarterly 45 (181):523.
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  23. Vere Chappell (1994). Locke on the Freedom of the Will. In G. A. J. Rogers (ed.), Locke's Philosophy: Content and Context. Oxford University Press. 101--21.
    Locke was a libertarian: he believed in human freedom. To be sure, his conception of freedom was different from that of many philosophers who call themselves libertarians. Some such philosophers maintain that an agent is free only if her action is uncaused; whereas Locke thought that all actions have causes, including the free ones. Some libertarians hold that no action is free unless it proceeds from a volition that is itself free; whereas Locke argued that free volition, as opposed to (...)
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  24. Vere Chappell (1994). Locke on the Intellectual Basis of Sin. Journal of the History of Philosophy 32 (2):197-207.
    The Essay concerning Human Understanding was published at the end of 1689.1 It sold well, and within three years Locke was planning revisions for a second edition. Among those whose “advice and assistance” he sought was the Irish scientist William Molyneux. Locke had begun a correspondence with Molyneux a few months before, after the latter had lavishly praised the Essay and its author in the Epistle Dedicatory of his own Dioptrica Nova, published early in 1692. Here was a man, Locke (...)
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  25. Vere Chappell (1994). 2 Locke's Theory of Ideas. In V. C. Chappell (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Locke. Cambridge University Press. 26.
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  26. Vere Chappell (1992). Keith Lehrer, Thomas Reid. [REVIEW] Philosophical Review 101 (4):860-862.
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  27. Vere Chappell (1990). Locke's Moral Psychology. Journal of Philosophy 87 (10):524-525.
  28. Vere Chappell (1990). Locke on the Ontology of Matter, Living Things and Persons. Philosophical Studies 60 (1-2):19 - 32.
  29. Vere Chappell (1989). Locke and Relative Identity. History of Philosophy Quarterly 6 (1):69 - 83.
    LOCKE'S DISCUSSION OF ORGANISMS AND PERSONS IN "ESSAY" II.XXVI HAS LED GEACH AND OTHERS TO ATTRIBUTE THE THESIS OF RELATIVE IDENTITY TO HIM; THAT X IS NEVER IDENTICAL WITH Y "TOUT COURT" BUT ONLY RELATIVE TO SOME SORTAL PROPERTY F: X IS THE SAME F AS Y. I ARGUE THAT THIS ATTRIBUTION RESTS ON A MISUNDERSTANDING OF LOCKE'S POSITION. LOCKE INDEED HOLDS THAT AN OLD TREE MAY BE THE SAME OAK AS THE SEEDLING FROM WHICH IT GREW, WHEREAS THE PARTICLES (...)
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  30. Vere Chappell (1986). Personal Identity. Teaching Philosophy 9 (1):71-74.
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  31. Vere Chappell (1983). Howard Jones, Ed. And Trans., Pierre Gassendi's Institutio Logica Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 3 (4):174-176.
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  32. Vere Chappell (1982). Individual Rights in the Corporation. Teaching Philosophy 5 (3):267-268.
  33. Vere Chappell (1981). Ethics in the Education of Business Managers. Teaching Philosophy 4 (2):168-170.
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  34. Vere Chappell (1976). Logic Lane. Teaching Philosophy 1 (3):359-360.
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  35. Vere Chappell (1973). Matter. Journal of Philosophy 70 (19):679-696.
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  36. Vere C. Chappell (1965). Ego and Person: Phenomenology or Analysis. The Monist 49 (1):18 - 27.
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  37. Vere C. Chappell (1963). Myself and Others. Analysis 23 (January):50-57.
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  38. Vere C. Chappell (1963). The Concept of Dreaming. Philosophical Quarterly 13 (July):193-213.
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