Search results for 'Verification' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Timothy R. Colburn (1991). Program Verification, Defeasible Reasoning, and Two Views of Computer Science. Minds and Machines 1 (1):97-116.score: 18.0
    In this paper I attempt to cast the current program verification debate within a more general perspective on the methodologies and goals of computer science. I show, first, how any method involved in demonstrating the correctness of a physically executing computer program, whether by testing or formal verification, involves reasoning that is defeasible in nature. Then, through a delineation of the senses in which programs can be run as tests, I show that the activities of testing and formal (...)
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  2. Joeri Engelfriet, Catholijn M. Jonker & Jan Treur (2002). Compositional Verification of Multi-Agent Systems in Temporal Multi-Epistemic Logic. Journal of Logic, Language and Information 11 (2):195-225.score: 18.0
    Compositional verification aims at managing the complexity of theverification process by exploiting compositionality of the systemarchitecture. In this paper we explore the use of a temporal epistemiclogic to formalize the process of verification of compositionalmulti-agent systems. The specification of a system, its properties andtheir proofs are of a compositional nature, and are formalized within acompositional temporal logic: Temporal Multi-Epistemic Logic. It isshown that compositional proofs are valid under certain conditions.Moreover, the possibility of incorporating default persistence ofinformation in a (...)
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  3. David A. Nelson (1992). Deductive Program Verification (a Practitioner's Commentary). Minds and Machines 2 (3):283-307.score: 18.0
    A proof of ‘correctness’ for a mathematical algorithm cannot be relevant to executions of a program based on that algorithm because both the algorithm and the proof are based on assumptions that do not hold for computations carried out by real-world computers. Thus, proving the ‘correctness’ of an algorithm cannot establish the trustworthiness of programs based on that algorithm. Despite the (deceptive) sameness of the notations used to represent them, the transformation of an algorithm into an executable program is a (...)
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  4. Uri Pincas (2011). Program Verification and Functioning of Operative Computing Revisited: How About Mathematics Engineering? [REVIEW] Minds and Machines 21 (2):337-359.score: 18.0
    The issue of proper functioning of operative computing and the utility of program verification, both in general and of specific methods, has been discussed a lot. In many of those discussions, attempts have been made to take mathematics as a model of knowledge and certitude achieving, and accordingly infer about the suitable ways to handle computing. I shortly review three approaches to the subject, and then take a stance by considering social factors which affect the epistemic status of both (...)
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  5. Martin Kavka (2012). Verification (Bewahrung) in Martin Buber. Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 20 (1):71-98.score: 18.0
    Abstract The work of Martin Buber oscillates between talk in which transcendence is experienced and talk in which transcendence is merely postulated. In order to show and mend this incoherence in Buber's thought, this essay attends to the rhetoric of verification ( Bewährung ), primarily but not solely in I and Thou (1923), both in order to show how it is a symptom of this incoherence, and also to show a broad pragmatic strain in Buber's thought. Given this pragmatic (...)
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  6. Kathi Fisler (1999). Timing Diagrams: Formalization and Algorithmic Verification. [REVIEW] Journal of Logic, Language and Information 8 (3):323-361.score: 18.0
    Timing diagrams are popular in hardware design. They have been formalized for use in reasoning tasks, such as computer-aided verification. These efforts have largely treated timing diagrams as interfaces to established notations for which verification is decidable; this has restricted timing diagrams to expressing only regular language properties. This paper presents a timing diagram logic capable of expressing certain context-free and context-sensitive properties. It shows that verification is decidable for properties expressible in this logic. More specifically, it (...)
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  7. Seana Coulson Jennifer Collins, Diane Pecher, René Zeelenberg (2011). Modality Switching in a Property Verification Task: An ERP Study of What Happens When Candles Flicker After High Heels Click. Frontiers in Psychology 2.score: 18.0
    The perceptual modalities associated with property words, such as flicker or click, have previously been demonstrated to affect subsequent property verification judgments (Pecher et al., 2003). Known as the conceptual modality switch effect, this finding supports the claim that brain systems for perception and action help subserve the representation of concepts. The present study addressed the cognitive and neural substrate of this effect by recording event-related potentials (ERPs) as participants performed a property verification task with visual or auditory (...)
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  8. James H. Fetzer (1991). Philosophical Aspects of Program Verification. Minds and Machines 1 (2):197-216.score: 15.0
    A debate over the theoretical capabilities of formal methods in computer science has raged for more than two years now. The function of this paper is to summarize the key elements of this debate and to respond to important criticisms others have advanced by placing these issues within a broader context of philosophical considerations about the nature of hardware and of software and about the kinds of knowledge that we have the capacity to acquire concerning their performance.
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  9. J. W. Meiland (1966). Analogy, Verification, and Other Minds. Mind 75 (October):564-568.score: 15.0
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  10. Rick Dale & Nicholas D. Duran (2011). The Cognitive Dynamics of Negated Sentence Verification. Cognitive Science 35 (5):983-996.score: 15.0
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  11. Francien Dechesne & Yanjing Wang (2010). To Know or Not to Know: Epistemic Approaches to Security Protocol Verification. Synthese 177 (Supplement-1):51-76.score: 15.0
    Security properties naturally combine temporal aspects of protocols with aspects of knowledge of the agents. Since BAN-logic, there have been several initiatives and attempts to incorpórate epistemics into the analysis of security protocols. In this paper, we give an overview of work in the field and present it in a unified perspective, with comparisons on technical subtleties that have been employed in different approaches. Also, we study to which degree the use of epistemics is essential for the analysis of security (...)
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  12. Cora Diamond (1999). How Old Are These Bones? Putnam, Wittgenstein and Verification: Cora Diamond. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 73 (1):99–134.score: 12.0
    Hilary Putnam has argued against philosophical theories which tie the content of truth-claims closely to the available methods of investigation and verification. Such theories, he argues, threaten our idea of human communication, which we take to be possible between people of different cultures and across periods of time during which methods of investigation change dramatically. Putnam rejects any reading of Wittgenstein which takes him to make a close tie between meaning and method of verification. What strands in Wittgenstein's (...)
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  13. James H. Fetzer (1988). Program Verification: The Very Idea. Communications of the ACM 31 (9):1048--1063.score: 12.0
    The notion of program verification appears to trade upon an equivocation. Algorithms, as logical structures, are appropriate subjects for deductive verification. Programs, as causal models of those structures, are not. The success of program verification as a generally applicable and completely reliable method for guaranteeing program performance is not even a theoretical possibility.
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  14. Alexander Miller (1998). Emotivism and the Verification Principle. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 98 (2):103–124.score: 12.0
    In chapter VI of Language, Truth, and Logic, A.J. Ayer argues that ethical statements are not literally significant. Unlike metaphysical statements, however, ethical statements are not nonsensical: even though they are not literally significant, Ayer thinks that they possess some other sort of significance. This raises the question: by what principle or criterion can we distinguish, among the class of statements that are not literally significant, between those which are genuinely meaningless and those which possess some other, non-literal form of (...)
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  15. Mark D. Semon (1982). Experimental Verification of an Aharonov-Bohm Effect in Rotating Reference Frames. Foundations of Physics 12 (1):49-57.score: 12.0
    A thought experiment is reviewed which shows two things. First, in a region of a rotating frame that is not simply connected, the inertial forces can be canceled without completely canceling the inertial vector potential (whose curl determines the Coriolis force); second, the presence of this uncanceled potential can be detected in a quantum interference experiment. It is then argued that the thought experiment was realized in an earlier experiment involving a rotating superconductor, and that the experimental results confirm the (...)
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  16. Andreas Blank (2011). Wittgenstein on Verification and Seeing-As, 1930–1932. Inquiry 54 (6):614 - 632.score: 12.0
    Abstract This article examines the little-explored remarks on verification in Wittgenstein's notebooks during the period between 1930 and 1932. In these remarks, Wittgenstein connects a verificationist theory of meaning with the notion of logical multiplicity, understood as a space of possibilities: a proposition is verified by a fact if and only if the proposition and the fact have the same logical multiplicity. But while in his early philosophy logical multiplicities were analysed as an outcome of the formal properties of (...)
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  17. Harvey Friedman, Adventures in the Verification of Mathematics.score: 12.0
    Mathematical statements arising from program verification are believed to be much easier to deal with than statements coming from serious mathematics. At least this is true for “normal programming”.
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  18. Peter Milne (1991). Verification, Falsification, and the Logic of Enquiry. Erkenntnis 34 (1):23 - 54.score: 12.0
    Our starting point is Michael Luntley's falsificationist semantics for the logical connectives and quantifiers: the details of his account are criticised but we provide an alternative falsificationist semantics that yields intuitionist logic, as Luntley surmises such a semantics ought. Next an account of the logical connectives and quantifiers that combines verificationist and falsificationist perspectives is proposed and evaluated. While the logic is again intuitionist there is, somewhat surprisingly, an unavoidable asymmetry between the verification and falsification conditions for negation, the (...)
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  19. Maria Trumpler (1997). Verification and Variation: Patterns of Experimentation in Investigations of Galvanism in Germany, 1790-1800. Philosophy of Science 64 (4):84.score: 12.0
    Based on the historical case of galvanic experimentation in Germany, I identify five types of experimentation which explored and shaped the new phenomenon rather than tested theoretical predictions. Verification evaluated initial reports of Galvani's phenomenon. Simplification reduced the experimental protocol to the fewest and most basic steps. Optimization found experimental conditions that magnified the observed effect. Exploration tested a wide variety of metals, animals or configurations. Application modified the experiment to address unresolved related problems. Attempts to derive laws of (...)
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  20. Nicola Angius (2013). Abstraction and Idealization in the Formal Verification of Software Systems. Minds and Machines 23 (2):211-226.score: 12.0
    Questions concerning the epistemological status of computer science are, in this paper, answered from the point of view of the formal verification framework. State space reduction techniques adopted to simplify computational models in model checking are analysed in terms of Aristotelian abstractions and Galilean idealizations characterizing the inquiry of empirical systems. Methodological considerations drawn here are employed to argue in favour of the scientific understanding of computer science as a discipline. Specifically, reduced models gained by Dataion are acknowledged as (...)
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  21. Anna Szabolcsi, Lewis Bott & Brian McElree (2008). The Effect of Negative Polarity Items on Inference Verification. Journal of Semantics 25 (4):411-450.score: 12.0
    The scalar approach to negative polarity item (NPI) licensing assumes that NPIs are allowable in contexts in which the introduction of the NPI leads to proposition strengthening (e.g., Kadmon & Landman 1993, Krifka 1995, Lahiri 1997, Chierchia 2006). A straightforward processing prediction from such a theory is that NPI’s facilitate inference verification from sets to subsets. Three experiments are reported that test this proposal. In each experiment, participants evaluated whether inferences from sets to subsets were valid. Crucially, we manipulated (...)
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  22. Naomi Oreskes, Kristin Shrader-Frechette & Kenneth Belitz (1994). Verification, Validation, and Confirmation of Numerical Models in the Earth Sciences. Science 263 (5147):641-646.score: 12.0
    Verification and validation of numerical models of natural systems is impossible. This is because natural systems are never closed and because model results are always nonunique. Models can be confirmed by the demonstration of agreement between observation and prediction, but confirmation is inherently partial. Complete confirmation is logically precluded by the fallacy of affirming the consequent and by incomplete access to natural phenomena. Models can only be evaluated in relative terms, and their predictive value is always open to question. (...)
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  23. Claudia Wiesemann (2011). Is There a Right Not to Know One's Sex? The Ethics of 'Gender Verification' in Women's Sports Competitions. Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (4):216-220.score: 12.0
    The paper discusses the current medical practice of "gender verification" in sports from an ethical point of view. It takes the recent public discussion about 800-meter runner Caster Semenya as a starting point. At the World Championships in Athletics 2009 in Berlin, Germany, Semenya was challenged by competitors as being a so called "sex impostor". A medical examination to verify her sex ensued. The author analyses whether athletes like Semenya could claim a right not to know that is generally (...)
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  24. P. H. Esser (1956). B. “Verification” of Statements in Psychiatry. Synthese 10 (1):373-377.score: 12.0
    (1) It remains to be seen if in the field of Psychiatry just as in that of Psychology the verbal output of a subject can be submitted to verification. Many statements of a highly emotional character being merely symptoms of certain dispositions have no direct communicative sense at all.(2) It being one of the characteristics of the mentally ill to loose contact and exchange of ideas with other people, the question naturally suggests itself if this symptom may be at (...)
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  25. Jason Fitzgerald Smith, Allen R. Braun, Gene E. Alexander, Kewei Chen & Barry Horwitz (2013). Separating Lexical-Semantic Access From Other Mnemonic Processes in Picture-Name Verification. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 12.0
    We present a novel paradigm to identify shared and unique brain regions underlying non-semantic, non-phonological, abstract, audio-visual (AV) memory versus naming using a longitudinal functional magnetic resonance imaging experiment. Participants were trained to associate novel AV stimulus pairs containing hidden linguistic content. Half of the stimulus pairs were distorted images of animals and sine-wave speech versions of the animal’s name. Images and sounds were distorted in such a way as to make their linguistic content easily recognizable only after being made (...)
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  26. Moritz Schlick (1936). Meaning and Verification. Philosophical Review 45 (4):339-369.score: 9.0
  27. Markus Schrenk (2008). Verificationist Theory of Meaning. In U. Windhorst, M. Binder & N. Hirowaka (eds.), Encyclopaedic Reference of Neuroscience. Springer.score: 9.0
    The verification theory of meaning aims to characterise what it is for a sentence to be meaningful and also what kind of abstract object the meaning of a sentence is. A brief outline is given by Rudolph Carnap, one of the theory's most prominent defenders: If we knew what it would be for a given sentence to be found true then we would know what its meaning is. [...] thus the meaning of a sentence is in a certain sense (...)
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  28. W. V. Quine (1996). (1951) The Verification Theory and Reductionism. In The Emergence of Logical Empiricism Garland Publishing.score: 9.0
  29. Maren Behrensen, Intersex Athletes: Do We Need A Gender Police In Professional Sports? IWM Junior Visiting Fellows' Conferences XXIX.score: 9.0
    Based on the case of Caster Semenya, I argue in this paper that the practice of Gender Verification Testing (GVT) in professional sports is unethical and pointless. The presumed benefit of GVT—ensuring fair competition for female athletes—is virtually nonexistent compared to its potential harms, in particular the exposure of individual athletes to a largely interphobic public. GVTs constitute a serious incursion on the athlete’s dignity, autonomy, and privacy; an incursion that cannot be justified by the appeal to fairness. My (...)
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  30. Sven Ove Hansson (2006). Falsificationism Falsified. Foundations of Science 11 (3):275-286.score: 9.0
    A conceptual analysis of falsificationism is performed, in which the central falsificationist thesis is divided into several components. Furthermore, an empirical study of falsification in science is reported, based on the 70 scientific contributions that were published as articles in Nature in 2000. Only one of these articles conformed to the falsificationist recipe for successful science, namely the falsification of a hypothesis that is more accessible to falsification than to verification. It is argued that falsificationism relies on an incorrect (...)
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  31. Douglas J. McDermid (2001). What is Direct Perceptual Knowledge? A Fivefold Confusion. Grazer Philosophische Studien 62 (1):1-16.score: 9.0
    When philosophers speak of direct perceptual knowledge, they obviously mean to suggest that such knowledge is unmediated ? but unmediated by what? This is where we find evidence of violent disagreement. To clarify matters, I want to identify and briefly describe several important senses of "direct" that have helped shape our understanding of perceptual knowledge. They are (1) "Direct" as Non-Inferential Perception; (2) "Direct" as Unmediating by Objects of Perception; (3) "Direct" as Conceptually Unmediated Perception; (4) "Direct" as Independent (...) of Perceptual Beliefs; and (5) "Direct" as Perception of What is Epistemically Prior. (shrink)
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  32. Crispin Wright (1989). The Verification Principle: Another Puncture--Another Patch. Mind 98 (392):611-622.score: 9.0
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  33. Jeremy Avigad (2010). Understanding, Formal Verification, and the Philosophy of Mathematics. Journal of the Indian Council of Philosophical Research 27:161-197.score: 9.0
  34. C. I. Lewis (1954). The Verification Theory of Meaning: A Comment. Philosophical Review 63 (2):193-196.score: 9.0
  35. Stephen T. Davis (1975). Theology, Verification, and Falsification. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 6 (1):23 - 39.score: 9.0
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  36. Benson Mates (1964). On the Verification of Statements About Ordinary Language. In V. C. Chappell (ed.), Ordinary Language: Essays in Philosophical Method. Dover Publications. 161 – 171.score: 9.0
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  37. Aaron Z. Zimmerman (2006). Self-Verification and the Content of Thought. Synthese 149 (1):59-75.score: 9.0
    Burge follows Descartes in claiming that the category of conceptually self-verifying judgments includes (but is not restricted to) judgments that give rise to sincere assertions of sentences of the form, 'I am thinking that p'. In this paper I argue that Burge’s Cartesian insight is hard to reconcile with Fregean accounts of the content of thought. Burge's intuitively compelling claim that cogito judgments are conceptually self-verifying poses a real challenge to neo-Fregean theories of content.
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  38. John Wisdom (1938). Metaphysics and Verification (I.). Mind 47 (188):452-498.score: 9.0
  39. Everett J. Nelson (1954). The Verification Theory of Meaning. Philosophical Review 63 (2):182-192.score: 9.0
  40. Robert Audi (1976). Eschatological Verification and Personal Identity. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 7 (4):391 - 408.score: 9.0
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  41. Michael Hymers (2005). Going Around the Vienna Circle: Wittgenstein and Verification. Philosophical Investigations 28 (3):205–234.score: 9.0
    I argue that Wittgenstein’s short-lived verificationism (c.1929-30) differed from that of his contacts in the Vienna Circle in not being a reductionist view. It lay the groundwork for his later views that the meaning of a word is determined by its use and that certain "propositions of the form of empirical propositions" (On Certainty, §§96, 401, 402) act as "norm[s] of description" (On Certainty,§§167, 321). He gave it up once he realized that it contradicted his rejection of logical atomism, and (...)
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  42. J. L. Evans (1953). On Meaning and Verification. Mind 62 (245):1-19.score: 9.0
  43. Steven Gerrard (1999). How Old Are These Bones? Putnam, Wittgenstein and Verification: Steven Gerrard. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 73 (1):135–150.score: 9.0
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  44. A. J. Ayer (1936). Verification and Experience. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 37:137 - 156.score: 9.0
  45. Bede Rundle (1972). Perception, Sensation, and Verification. Oxford University Press.score: 9.0
  46. Amedeo Giorgi (1986). The "Context of Discovery/Context of Verification" Distinction and Descriptive Human Science. Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 17 (2):151-166.score: 9.0
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  47. Felix Kaufmann (1943). Verification, Meaning, and Truth. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 4 (2):267-284.score: 9.0
  48. C. J. Ducasse (1936). Verification, Verifiability, and Meaningfulness. Journal of Philosophy 33 (9):230-236.score: 9.0
  49. Herbert Lamm (1967). Book Review:The Bounds of Sense: An Essay on Kant's "Critique of Pure Reason." P. R. Strawson; Kant's Analytic. Jonathan Bennett; Kant's Solution for Verification in Metaphysics. D. P. Dryer; Kant's Philosophical Correspondence, 1759-99. Arnulf Zweig. [REVIEW] Ethics 78 (1):89-.score: 9.0
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  50. Aaron Z. Zimmerman (2005). Self-Verification and the Content of Thought. Synthese 149 (1):59 - 75.score: 9.0
    Descartes famously argued, on purely conceptual grounds, that even an extremely powerful being could not trick him into mistakenly judging that he was thinking. Of course, it is not necessarily true that Descartes is thinking. Still, Descartes claimed, it is necessarily true that if a person judges that she is thinking, that person is thinking. Following Tyler Burge (1988) we call such judgments ‘self-verifying.’ More exactly, a judgment j performed by a subject S at a time t is selfverifying if (...)
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