Search results for 'Verisimilitude' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Roberto Festa (2007). Verisimilitude, Cross Classification and Prediction Logic. Approaching the Statistical Truth by Falsified Qualitative Theories. Mind and Society 6 (1):91-114.score: 24.0
    In this paper it is argued that qualitative theories (Q-theories) can be used to describe the statistical structure of cross classified populations and that the notion of verisimilitude provides an appropriate tool for measuring the statistical adequacy of Q-theories. First of all, a short outline of the post-Popperian approaches to verisimilitude and of the related verisimilitudinarian non-falsificationist methodologies (VNF-methodologies) is given. Secondly, the notion of Q-theory is explicated, and the qualitative verisimilitude of Q-theories is defined. Afterwards, appropriate (...)
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  2. Gustavo Cevolani (2011). Strongly Semantic Information and Verisimilitude. Etica and Politica / Ethics and Politics (2):159-179.score: 24.0
    In The Philosophy of Information, Luciano Floridi presents a theory of “strongly semantic information”, based on the idea that “information encapsulates truth” (the so-called “veridicality thesis”). Starting with Popper, philosophers of science have developed different explications of the notion of verisimilitude or truthlikeness, construed as a combination of truth and information. Thus, the theory of strongly semantic information and the theory of verisimilitude are intimately tied. Yet, with few exceptions, this link has virtually pass unnoticed. In this paper, (...)
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  3. Sjoerd D. Zwart & Maarten Franssen (2007). An Impossibility Theorem for Verisimilitude. Synthese 158 (1):75 - 92.score: 24.0
    In this paper, we show that Arrow’s well-known impossibility theorem is instrumental in bringing the ongoing discussion about verisimilitude to a more general level of abstraction. After some preparatory technical steps, we show that Arrow’s requirements for voting procedures in social choice are also natural desiderata for a general verisimilitude definition that places content and likeness considerations on the same footing. Our main result states that no qualitative unifying procedure of a functional form can simultaneously satisfy the requirements (...)
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  4. Gustavo Cevolani, Roberto Festa & Theo A. F. Kuipers (2013). Verisimilitude and Belief Change for Nomic Conjunctive Theories. Synthese 190 (16):3307-3324.score: 24.0
    In this paper, we address the problem of truth approximation through theory change, asking whether revising our theories by newly acquired data leads us closer to the truth about a given domain. More particularly, we focus on “nomic conjunctive theories”, i.e., theories expressed as conjunctions of logically independent statements concerning the physical or, more generally, nomic possibilities and impossibilities of the domain under inquiry. We define both a comparative and a quantitative notion of the verisimilitude of such theories, and (...)
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  5. Giangiacomo Gerla (2007). Point-Free Geometry and Verisimilitude of Theories. Journal of Philosophical Logic 36 (6):707 - 733.score: 24.0
    A metric approach to Popper's verisimilitude question is proposed which is related to point-free geometry. Indeed, we define the theory of approximate metric spaces whose primitive notions are regions, inclusion relation, minimum distance, and maximum distance between regions. Then, we show that the class of possible scientific theories has the structure of an approximate metric space. So, we can define the verisimilitude of a theory as a function of its (approximate) distance from the truth. This avoids some of (...)
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  6. Robert Northcott (2013). Verisimilitude: A Causal Approach. Synthese 190 (9):1471-1488.score: 24.0
    I present a new definition of verisimilitude, framed in terms of causes. Roughly speaking, according to it a scientific model is approximately true if it captures accurately the strengths of the causes present in any given situation. Against much of the literature, I argue that any satisfactory account of verisimilitude must inevitably restrict its judgments to context-specific models rather than general theories. We may still endorse—and only need—a relativized notion of scientific progress, understood now not as global advance (...)
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  7. Graham Oddie (2013). The Content, Consequence and Likeness Approaches to Verisimilitude: Compatibility, Trivialization, and Underdetermination. Synthese 190 (9):1647-1687.score: 24.0
    Theories of verisimilitude have routinely been classified into two rival camps—the content approach and the likeness approach—and these appear to be motivated by very different sets of data and principles. The question thus naturally arises as to whether these approaches can be fruitfully combined. Recently Zwart and Franssen (Synthese 158(1):75–92, 2007) have offered precise analyses of the content and likeness approaches, and shown that given these analyses any attempt to meld content and likeness orderings violates some basic desiderata. Unfortunately (...)
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  8. Gregory M. Mikkelson (2001). Complexity and Verisimilitude: Realism for Ecology. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 16 (4):533-546.score: 24.0
    When data are limited, simple models of complex ecological systems tend to wind up closer to the truth than more complex models of the same systems. This greater proximity to the truth, or verisimilitude, leads to greater predictive success. When more data are available, the advantage of simplicity decreases, and more complex models may gain the upper hand. In ecology, holistic models are usually simpler than reductionistic models. Thus, when data are limited, holistic models have an advantage over reductionistic (...)
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  9. Gerhard Schurz & Paul Weingartner (2010). Zwart and Franssen's Impossibility Theorem Holds for Possible-World-Accounts but Not for Consequence-Accounts to Verisimilitude. Synthese 172 (3):415 - 436.score: 24.0
    Zwart and Franssen’s impossibility theorem reveals a conflict between the possible-world-based content-definition and the possible-world-based likeness-definition of verisimilitude. In Sect. 2 we show that the possible-world-based content-definition violates four basic intuitions of Popper’s consequence-based content-account to verisimilitude, and therefore cannot be said to be in the spirit of Popper’s account, although this is the opinion of some prominent authors. In Sect. 3 we argue that in consequence-accounts , content-aspects and likeness-aspects of verisimilitude are not in conflict with (...)
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  10. Jesús P. Zamora Bonilla (2002). Verisimilitude and the Dynamics of Scientific Research Programmes. Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 33 (2):349 - 368.score: 24.0
    Some peculiarities of the evaluation of theories within scientific research programmes (SRPs) and of the assessing of rival SRPs are described assuming that scientists try to maximise an 'epistemic utility function' under economic and institutional constraints. Special attention is given to Lakatos' concepts of 'empirical progress' and 'theoretical progress'. A notion of 'empirical verisimilitude' is defended as an appropriate utility function. The neologism 'methodonomics' is applied to this kind of studies.
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  11. Jesús P. Zamora Bonilla (2002). Verisimilitude and the Dynamics of Scientific Research Programmes. Journal for General Philosophy of Science 33 (2):349-368.score: 24.0
    Some peculiarities of the evaluation of theories within scientific research programmes (SRPs) and of the assessing of rival SRPs are described assuming that scientists try to maximise an ‘epistemic utility function’ under economic and institutional constraints. Special attention is given to Lakatos' concepts of ‘empirical progress’ and ‘theoretical progress’. A notion of ‘empirical verisimilitude’ is defended as an appropriate utility function. The neologism ‘methodonomics’ is applied to this kind of studies.
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  12. Gustavo Cevolani, Vincenzo Crupi & Roberto Festa (2010). The Whole Truth About Linda: Probability, Verisimilitude and a Paradox of Conjunction. In Marcello D'Agostino, Federico Laudisa, Giulio Giorello, Telmo Pievani & Corrado Sinigaglia (eds.), New Essays in Logic and Philosophy of Science. College Publications. 603--615.score: 21.0
    We provide a 'verisimilitudinarian' analysis of the well-known Linda paradox or conjunction fallacy, i.e., the fact that most people judge the probability of the conjunctive statement "Linda is a bank teller and is active in the feminist movement" (B & F) as more probable than the isolated statement "Linda is a bank teller" (B), contrary to an uncontroversial principle of probability theory. The basic idea is that experimental participants may judge B & F a better hypothesis about Linda as compared (...)
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  13. Roger Vergauwen & Rodrigo González (2005). On the Verisimilitude of Artificial Intelligence. Logique Et Analyse- 190 (189):323-350.score: 21.0
  14. I. Niiniluoto (1998). Survey Article. Verisimilitude: The Third Period. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 49 (1):1-29.score: 18.0
    The modern history of verisimilitude can be divided into three periods. The first began in 1960, when Karl Popper proposed his qualitative definition of what it is for one theory to be more truthlike than another theory, and lasted until 1974, when David Miller and Pavel Trichý published their refutation of Popper's definition. The second period started immediately with the attempt to explicate truthlikeness by means of relations of similarity or resemblance between states of affairs (or their linguistic representations); (...)
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  15. Pavel Tichy (1974). On Popper's Definitions of Verisimilitude. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 25 (2):155 - 160.score: 18.0
    2 Popper's Logical Definition of Verisimilitude. 3 Popper's Probabilistic Definition of Verisimilitude. 4 Conclusion.
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  16. Gustavo Cevolani, Vincenzo Crupi & Roberto Festa (2011). Verisimilitude and Belief Change for Conjunctive Theories. Erkenntnis 75 (2):183-202.score: 18.0
    Theory change is a central concern in contemporary epistemology and philosophy of science. In this paper, we investigate the relationships between two ongoing research programs providing formal treatments of theory change: the (post-Popperian) approach to verisimilitude and the AGM theory of belief change. We show that appropriately construed accounts emerging from those two lines of epistemological research do yield convergences relative to a specified kind of theories, here labeled “conjunctive”. In this domain, a set of plausible conditions are identified (...)
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  17. Ilkka Niiniluoto (1998). Verisimilitude: The Third Period. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 49 (1):1-29.score: 18.0
    The modern history of verisimilitude can be divided into three periods. The first began in 1960, when Karl Popper proposed his qualitative definition of what it is for one theory to be more truthlike than another theory, and lasted until 1974, when David Miller and Pavel Trich published their refutation of Popper's definition. The second period started immediately with the attempt to explicate truthlikeness by means of relations of similarity or resemblance between states of affairs (or their linguistic representations); (...)
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  18. Ken Gemes (2007). Verisimilitude and Content. Synthese 154 (2):293 - 306.score: 18.0
    Popper’s original definition of verisimilitude in terms of comparisons of truth content and falsity content has known counter-examples. More complicated approaches have met with mixed success. This paper uses a new account of logical content to develop a definition of verisimilitude that is close to Popper’s original account. It is claimed that Popper’s mistake was to couch his account of truth and falsity content in terms of true and false consequences. Comparison to a similar approach by Schurz and (...)
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  19. Mark Ryan & Pierre-Yves Schobbens (1995). Belief Revision and Verisimilitude. Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 36 (1):15-29.score: 18.0
    The Egli-Milner power-ordering is used to define verisimilitude orderings on theories from preference orderings on models. The effects of the definitions on constraints such as stopperedness and soundness are explored. Orderings on theories are seen to contain more information than orderings on models. Belief revision is defined in terms of both types of orderings, and conditions are given which make the two notions coincide.
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  20. Katarina Britz & Chris Brink (1995). Computing Verisimilitude. Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 36 (1):30-43.score: 18.0
    This paper continues the power ordering approach to verisimilitude. We define a parameterized verisimilar ordering of theories in the finite propositional case, both semantically and syntactically. The syntactic definition leads to an algorithm for computing verisimilitude. Since the power ordering approach to verisimilitude can be translated into a standard notion of belief revision, the algorithm thereby also allows the computation of membership of a belief-revised theory.
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  21. Chris Brink (1989). Verisimilitude: Views and Reviews. History and Philosophy of Logic 10 (2):181-201.score: 18.0
    This paper is both a survey and a review of the current state of the debate concerning verisimilitude. As a survey it is intended for the interested outsider who wants both easy access to and some comparison between the respective approaches. As a review it covers the first three books on the topic: those of Oddie. Niiniluoto and Kuipers.
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  22. Gerard Renardel de Lavalette & Sjoerd Zwart (2011). Belief Revision and Verisimilitude Based on Preference and Truth Orderings. Erkenntnis 75 (2):237-254.score: 18.0
    In this rather technical paper we establish a useful combination of belief revision and verisimilitude according to which better theories provide better predictions, and revising with more verisimilar data results in theories that are closer to the truth. Moreover, this paper presents two alternative definitions of refined verisimilitude, which are more perspicuous than the algebraic version used in previous publications.
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  23. T. Britton (2004). The Problem of Verisimilitude and Counting Partially Identical Properties. Synthese 141 (1):77 - 95.score: 18.0
    In this paper I propose a solution to the qualitative version of David Miller's verisimilitude reversal argument. Miller (1974) shows that verisimilitude rankings are relative to language choice and hence, are not objective. My solution stems from a reply to an earlier solution proposed by Eric Barnes (1991). Barnes argues that the verisimilitude reversal problem can be solved by revealing an epistemic dimension. I show that Miller's problem cannot be solved by side-stepping foundational metaphysical claims as his (...)
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  24. Pavel Tichý (1974). On Popper's Definitions of Verisimilitude. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 25 (2):155-160.score: 18.0
    Popper has proposed two rigorous definitions of verisimilitude, A logical and a probabilistic one. The aim of this note is to show that, For simple logical reasons, Both are totally inadequate. It is demonstrated that on the logical definition, One false theory can never have more verisimilitude than another. An example of two theories a and b is given such that a is patently closer to the truth than b, Yet on popper's probabilistic definition, A has strictly less (...)
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  25. Joseph Wayne Smith (1984). What is Wrong with Verisimilitude. Philosophy Research Archives 10:511-541.score: 18.0
    Karl Popper introduced the idea of verisimilitude to explicate the intuitive idea that a theory T2, even though it is strictly speaking false, may be closer to the truth than a competitor T1. However, as is now well known, the results of Pavel Tichý, John Harris and David Miller establish that on Popper’s qualitative theory of verisimilitude, a theory T2 could be closer to the truth than another theory T1 only if T2 contains no false sentences. This result (...)
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  26. Joseph Agassi (1981). To Save Verisimilitude. Mind 90 (360):576-579.score: 18.0
    JOSEPH AGASSI 1. Sir Karl Popper has offered two different theories of scientific progress, his theory of conjectures and refutations and corroboration, as well as his theory of verisimilitude increase. The former was attacked by some old-fashioned inductivists, yet is triumphant; the latter has been refuted by Tichy and by Miller to Popper’s own satisfaction. Oddly, however, the theory of verisimilitude was developed because of some deficiency in the theory of corroboration, and though in its present precise formulation (...)
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  27. Paul E. Meehl (2004). Cliometric Metatheory III: Peircean Consensus, Verisimilitude and Asymptotic Method. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 55 (4):615-643.score: 18.0
    Statistical procedures can be applied to episodes in the history of science in order to weight attributes to predict short-term survival of theories; an asymptotic method is used to show that short-term survival is a valid proxy for ultimate survival; and a theoretical argument is made that ultimate survival is a valid proxy for objective truth. While realists will appreciate this last step, instrumentalists do not need it to benefit from the actuarial procedures of cliometric metatheory. Introduction A plausible proxy (...)
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  28. Jesús P. Zamora Bonilla (2005). Truthlikeness with a Human Face: On Some Connections Between the Theory of Verisimilitude and the Sociology of Scientific Knowledge. Poznan Studies in the Philosophy of the Sciences and the Humanities 83 (1):361-369.score: 18.0
    Verisimilitude theorists (and many scientific realists) assume that science attempts to provide hypotheses with an increasing degree of closeness to the full truth; on the other hand, radical sociologists of science assert that flesh and bone scientists struggle to attain much more mundane goals (such as income, power, fame, and so on). This paper argues that both points of view can be made compatible, for (1) rational individuals only would be interested in engaging in a strong competition (such as (...)
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  29. Joseph Agassi, Agassi, Verisimilitude, P.score: 18.0
    The idea of verisimilitude is implicit in the writings of Albert Einstein ever since 1905, when he declared the distribution of field energy according to Maxwell's theory an approximation to that according to quantum-radiation theory, and Newtonian kinetic energy an approximation to his relativistic mass-energy. All his life Einstein presented new ideas as yielding older established ones as special cases and first approximations. The news has reached the philosophical community via the writings of Sir Karl Popper half-a-century after (...)
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  30. JesÚ Zamora Bonilla & P. S. (1999). Verisimilitude and the Scientific Strategy of Economic Theory. Journal of Economic Methodology 6 (3):331-350.score: 18.0
    Methodological norms in economic theorizing are interpreted as rational strategies to optimize some epistemic utility functions. A definition of ?empirical verisimilitude? is defended as a plausible interpretation of the epistemic preferences of researchers. Some salient differences between the scientific strategies of physics and of economics are derived from the comparison of the relative costs associated with each strategy. The classical discussion about the ?realism of assumptions? in economics is also considered under the light of the concept of ?empirical (...)? (shrink)
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  31. Jesùs P. Zamora Bonilla (1996). Verisimilitude, Structuralism and Scientific Progress. Erkenntnis 44 (1):25 - 47.score: 18.0
    An epistemic notion of verisimilitude (as the degree in which a theory seems closer to the full truth to a scientific community) is defined in several ways. Application to the structuralist description of theories is carried out by introducing a notion of empirical regularity in structuralist terms. It is argued that these definitions of verisimilitude can be used to give formal reconstructions of scientific methodologies such as falsificationism, conventionalism and normal science.
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  32. I. A. Kieseppä (1996). On the Aim of the Theory of Verisimilitude. Synthese 107 (3):421 - 438.score: 18.0
    J. P. Z. Bonilla's methodological approach to truthlikeness is evaluated critically. On a more general level, various senses in which the theory of truthlikeness could be seen as a theory concerned with methodology are distinguished, and it is argued that providing speical sciences with methodological tools is unrealistic as an aim of the theory of verisimilitude. Rather, when developing this theory, one should rest contnet with the more modest aim of conceptual analysis, or of providing explications for the relational (...)
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  33. Herbert Keuth (1976). Verisimilitude or the Approach to the Whole Truth. Philosophy of Science 43 (3):311-336.score: 18.0
    Science progresses if we succeed in rendering the objects of scientific inquiry more comprehensively or more precisely. Popper tries to formalize this venerable idea. According to him the most comprehensive and most precise description of the world is given by the set T of all true statements. A hypothesis comes the closer to T, or has the more verisimilitude, the more true consequences and the fewer false consequences it implies. Popper proposes to order hypotheses by the inclusion relations between (...)
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  34. Ilkka Niiniluoto (1982). What Shall We Do with Verisimilitude? Philosophy of Science 49 (2):181-197.score: 18.0
    Popper distinguishes the problems of theoretical and pragmatic preference between rival theories, but he claims that there is a common non-inductive solution to both of them, viz. the "best-tested theory", or the theory with the highest degree of corroboration. He further suggests that the degrees of corroboration serve as indicators of verisimilitude. One may therefore raise the question whether the recent theory of verisimilitude gives a general non-inductive solution to the problem of theoretical preference. This paper argues that (...)
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  35. Gerhard Schurz (2011). Verisimilitude and Belief Revision. With a Focus on the Relevant Element Account. Erkenntnis 75 (2):203-221.score: 18.0
    The expansion or revision of false theories by true evidence does not always increase their verisimilitude. After a comparison of different notions of verisimilitude the relation between verisimilitude and belief expansion or revision is investigated within the framework of the relevant element account. We are able to find certain interesting conditions under which both the expansion and the revision of theories by true evidence is guaranteed to increase their verisimilitude.
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  36. Pavel Tichý (1978). Verisimilitude Revisited. Synthese 38 (2):175 - 196.score: 18.0
    The article offers a rigorous explication of the intuitive notion of verisimilitude, I.E., Of the distance of a theory from the truth. The proposal is defended against charges of material inadequacy made by popper, Niniluoto, And miller.
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  37. Ilkka Niiniluoto (1983). Verisimilitude Vs. Legisimilitude. Studia Logica 42 (2-3):315 - 329.score: 18.0
    The recent theories of truthlikeness have not paid attention to the distinction between lawlike and accidental generalizations. L.J. Cohen has expressed this by saying that science aims at legisimilitude rather than verisimilitude. G. Oddie has given a reply to Cohen by defining the notion of legisimilitude in terms of higher-order logics. This paper gives a different reply to Cohen by treating laws as physically necessary generalizations and by defining the notion of legisimilitude as closeness to a suitably chosen lawlike (...)
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  38. Philippe Mongin (1990). A Note on Verisimilitude and Relativization to Problems. Erkenntnis 33 (3):391 - 396.score: 18.0
    This note aims at critically assessing a little-noticed proposal made by Popper in the second edition ofObjective Knowledge to the effect that verisimilitude of scientific theories should be made relative to the problems they deal with. Using a simple propositional calculus formalism, it is shown that the relativized definition fails for the very same reason why Popper's original concept of verisimilitude collapsed-only if one of two theories is true can they be compared in terms of the suggested definition (...)
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  39. Peter L. Mott (1978). Verisimilitude by Means of Short Theorems. Synthese 38 (2):247 - 273.score: 18.0
    This paper began with the simple object of finding an account that allowed us to compare incompatible false theories. This we achieved with ρ. But that relation is language — or interest — dependent. ρ' is free from this limitation; though thus liberated it is perhaps rather unconcerned about what is true, and further fails to deliver certain intuitive comparisons. Whether ρ is to be preferred to ρ' or vice versa, seems to me a largely fruitless question: In fact it (...)
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  40. Ilkka Niiniluoto (1984). The Significance of Verisimilitude. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1984:591 - 613.score: 18.0
    The concept of verisimilitude is an indispensable tool for the fallibilist and realist epistemology. Part of the argument for this thesis consists in the important applications of this notion within the history and philosophy of science. But perhaps the harder part is to convince a sceptical reader of the existence of this concept. A general programme for defining and estimating degrees of truthlikeness for various kinds of scientific statements is outlined in some detail. Ten years after Miller's and Tichy's (...)
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  41. G. S. Robinson (1971). Popper's Verisimilitude. Analysis 31 (6):194 - 196.score: 18.0
    Popper proposes a technical concept of 'verisimilitude' as a test of the progressiveness of scientific theories. The paper attempts to show its uselessness and inapplicability on mathematical and practical grounds, As well as raising doubts about the value of any such attempt to give a mechanical test of scientific progress.
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  42. Robert G. Meyers (1974). In Defense of Popper's Verisimilitude. Philosophical Studies 25 (3):213 - 218.score: 18.0
    The paper is a reply to g s robinson's criticism in "analysis," volume 31, Of popper's attempt to clarify the notion of scientific progress in terms of verisimilitude. I argue that robinson (1) misunderstands popper's account of basic statements, (2) confuses verisimilitude with probability (despite popper's explicit warnings), And (3) fails to understand the sense in which popper claims that verisimilitude is objective.
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  43. Chris Mortensen (1983). Relevance and Verisimilitude. Synthese 55 (3):353 - 364.score: 18.0
    Popper's definition looked initially promising provided that the restriction of classical logic was removed. As we have seen, this promise is not fulfilled. The search for a satisfactory verisimilitude ordering must therefore be pursued along more mainstream lines. The present exercise ought, however, to make us aware of the possibility that breakdowns of proposed definitions might only occur because of strictly classical assumptions.
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  44. Ewa Orłowska (1990). Verisimilitude Based on Concept Analysis. Studia Logica 49 (3):307 - 320.score: 18.0
    In the paper ordering relations for comparison of verisimilitude of theories are introduced and discussed. The relations refer to semantic analysis of the results of theories, in particular to analysis of concepts the theories deal with.
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  45. Raimo Tuomela (1978). Theory-Distance and Verisimilitude. Synthese 38 (2):213 - 246.score: 18.0
    Measures of theory-Distance are defined for theories formalizable within first-Order predicate logic by using distributive normal forms. The account is applied to give measures of verisimilitude.
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  46. Jesùs P. Zamora Bonilla (1996). Verisimilitude, Structuralism and Scientific Progress. Erkenntnis 44 (1):25 - 47.score: 18.0
    An epistemic notion of verisimilitude (as the 'degree in which a theory seems closer to the full truth to a scientific community') is defined in several ways. Application to the structuralist description of theories is carried out by introducing a notion of 'empirical regularity' in structuralist terms. It is argued that these definitions of verisimilitude can be used to give formal reconstructions of scientific methodologies such as falsificationism, conventionalism and normal science.
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  47. Gerard R. Renardel de Lavalette & Sjoerd D. Zwart (2011). Belief Revision and Verisimilitude Based on Preference and Truth Orderings. Erkenntnis 75 (2):237-254.score: 18.0
    In this rather technical paper we establish a useful combination of belief revision and verisimilitude according to which better theories provide better predictions, and revising with more verisimilar data results in theories that are closer to the truth. Moreover, this paper presents two alternative definitions of refined verisimilitude, which are more perspicuous than the algebraic version used in previous publications.
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  48. Gerard R. Renardel de Lavalette & Sjoerd D. Zwart (2011). Belief Revision and Verisimilitude Based on Preference and Truth Orderings. Erkenntnis 75 (2):237 - 254.score: 18.0
    In this rather technical paper we establish a useful combination of belief revision and verisimilitude according to which better theories provide better predictions, and revising with more verisimilar data results in theories that are closer to the truth. Moreover, this paper presents two alternative definitions of refined verisimilitude, which are more perspicuous than the algebraic version used in previous publications.
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  49. Robert Burch (2010). If Universes Were as Plenty as Blackberries: Peirce on Induction and Verisimilitude. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 46 (3):423-452.score: 15.0
    In 1910, only four years before his death, Peirce began an adumbration of a life's worth of major results concerning nondeductive logic—results that he had reached after more than forty-five years of extremely careful and detailed investigations2—as follows: "I must premiss that we, all of us, use this word ["probability"] with a degree of laxity which corrupts and rots our reasoning to a degree that very few of us are at all awake to."3 Peirce continued the adumbration by outlining his (...)
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  50. Jerrold L. Aronson (1997). Truth, Verisimilitude, and Natural Kinds. Philosophical Papers 26 (1):71-104.score: 15.0
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