Search results for 'Vernon Van Dyke' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Christina Van Dyke (2007). Human Identity, Immanent Causal Relations, and the Principle of Non-Repeatability: Thomas Aquinas on the Bodily Resurrection. Religious Studies 43 (4):373 - 394.score: 240.0
    Can the persistence of a human being's soul at death and prior to the bodily resurrection be sufficient to guarantee that the resurrected human being is numerically identical to the human being who died? According to Thomas Aquinas, it can. Yet, given that Aquinas holds that the human being is identical to the composite of soul and body and ceases to exist at death, it's difficult to see how he can maintain this view. In this paper, I address Aquinas's response (...)
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  2. Christina Van Dyke (2002). The Soul. Philosophical Review 111 (3):456-458.score: 240.0
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  3. Blair G. Van Dyke & E. Vance Randall (2002). Educational Reform in Post-Accord Palestine: A Synthesis of Palestinian Perspectives. Educational Studies 28 (1):17-32.score: 240.0
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  4. Samenvatting van (forthcoming). De Stem van de St (r) aat. Res Publica.score: 180.0
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  5. Patrick Riordan (2012). Aquinas's Ethics: Metaphysical Foundations, Moral Theory and Theological Context. By Rebecca Konyndyk DeYoung, Colleen McCluskey and Christina Van Dyke. Pp. 264, Notre Dame IN, University of Notre Dame Press, 2009, $30.00. [REVIEW] Heythrop Journal 53 (4):711-712.score: 140.0
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  6. S. M. Crothers (1897). Book Review:The Gospel for an Age of Doubt. Henry Van Dyke. [REVIEW] Ethics 7 (4):516-.score: 140.0
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  7. Michael Barnwell (2011). Rebecca Konyndyk DeYoung, Colleen McCluskey, and Christina Van Dyke, Aquinas's Ethics: Metaphysical Foundations, Moral Theory, and Theological Context. Notre Dame, Ind.: University of Notre Dame Press, 2009. Paper. Pp. Xvi, 243; 1 Table. $30. [REVIEW] Speculum 86 (2):483-484.score: 140.0
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  8. Vernon Van Dyke (1960). Political Science: A Philosophical Analysis. London, Stevens.score: 87.0
     
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  9. Vernon White (2000). Gijsbert Van den Brink and Marcel Sarot (Eds) Understanding the Attributes of God. (Frankfurt: Peter Lang, 1999). Pp 185. Religious Studies 36 (2):227-245.score: 36.0
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  10. Vernon J. Bourke (1966). "Aristoteles Over de Menselijke Volkomenheid: Boeken I En II van de Nikomachische Etiek Met de Kommentaren van Eustratius En Een Anonymus in de Latijnse Vertaling van Grosseteste," by H. P. F. Mercken. [REVIEW] Modern Schoolman 43 (2):198-198.score: 36.0
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  11. Christina Van Dyke (2010). Mysticism. In The Cambridge History of Medieval Philosophy. 720-734.score: 28.0
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  12. Christina Van Dyke, I See Dead People: Disembodied Souls and Aquinas’s ‘Two-Person’ Problem.score: 28.0
  13. Christina Van Dyke (2010). The Truth, the Whole Truth, and Nothing but the Truth: Robert Grosseteste on Universals (and the Posterior Analytics ). Journal of the History of Philosophy 48 (2):pp. 153-170.score: 28.0
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  14. Christina Van Dyke & Sam Baron (forthcoming). Animal Interrupted, or Why Accepting Pascal’s Wager Might Be the Last Thing You Ever Do. Southern Journal of Philosophy.score: 28.0
    According to conventionalist accounts of personal identity, persons are constituted in part by practices and attitudes of certain sorts of care. In this paper, we concentrate on the most well-developed and defended version of conventionalism currently on offer (namely, that proposed by David Braddon-Mitchell, Caroline West, and Kristie Miller) and discuss how the conventionalist appears forced either 1) to accept arbitrariness concerning from which perspective to judge one’s survival or 2) to maintain egalitarianism at the cost of making ‘transfiguring’ decisions (...)
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  15. Christina Van Dyke (2007). Human Identity, Immanent Causal Relations, and the Principle of Non-Repeatability: Thomas Aquinas on the Bodily Resurrection. Religious Studies 43 (4):373-394.score: 28.0
  16. Christina Van Dyke (2012). Discipline and the Docile Body: Regulating Hungers in the Capitol. In The Hunger Games and Philosophy. 250-264.score: 28.0
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  17. Christina Van Dyke (2009). Not Properly a Person. Faith and Philosophy 26 (2):186-204.score: 28.0
    Like Aristotle, Thomas Aquinas holds that the rational soul is the substantial form of the human body. In so doing, he takes himself to be rejecting a Platonic version of substance dualism; his criticisms, however, apply equally to a traditional understanding of Cartesian dualism. Aquinas’s own peculiar brand of dualism is receiving increased attention from contemporary philosophers—especially those attracted to positions that fall between Cartesian substance dualism and reductive materialism. What Aquinas’s own view amounts to, however, is subject to debate. (...)
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  18. Christina Van Dyke (2009). An Aristotelian Theory of Divine Illumination: Robert Grosseteste's Commentary on the Posterior Analytics. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 17 (4):685-704.score: 28.0
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  19. Christina Van Dyke (2008). Eating as a Gendered Act: Christianity, Feminism, and Reclaiming the Body. In K. J. Clark (ed.) Readings in the Philosophy of Religion, 2nd Edition (Peterborough: Broadview Press, 2008). 475-489.score: 28.0
  20. Christina Van Dyke (2012). The End of (Human) Life as We Know It. Modern Schoolman 89 (3-4):243-257.score: 28.0
    Is the being in an irreversible persistent vegetative state as the result of a horrible accident numerically identical to the human person, Lindsay, who existed before the accident? Many proponents of Thomistic metaphysics have argued that Aquinas’s answer to this question must be “yes.” In particular, it seems that Aquinas’s commitment to both Aristotelian hylomorphism and the unity of substantial form (viz., that each body/soul composite possesses one and only one substantial form) entails the position that the human person remains (...)
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  21. Christina Van Dyke (2001). Aquinas's Moral Theory: Essays in Honor of Norman Kretzmann (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 39 (1):143-144.score: 28.0
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  22. Christina Van Dyke (2002). Review of Thomas Williams (Editor and Translator), Anselm: Three Philosophical Dialogues. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2002 (8).score: 28.0
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  23. C. van Dyke (2002). The Soul. Philosophical Review 111 (3):456-458.score: 28.0
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  24. Fred Van Dyke (2005). Teaching Ethical Analysis in Environmental Management Decisions: A Process-Oriented Approach. Science and Engineering Ethics 11 (4):659-669.score: 28.0
    The general public and environmental policy makers often perceive management actions of environmental managers as “science,” when such actions are, in fact, value judgments about when to intervene in natural processes. The choice of action requires ethical as well as scientific analysis because managers must choose a normative outcome to direct their intervention. I examine a management case study involving prescribed burning of sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata) communities in south-central Montana (USA) to illustrate how to teach students to ethically evaluate a (...)
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  25. Frank C. Keil, Courtney Stein, Lisa Webb, Van Dyke Billings & Leonid Rozenblit (2008). Discerning the Division of Cognitive Labor: An Emerging Understanding of How Knowledge Is Clustered in Other Minds. Cognitive Science 32 (2):259-300.score: 28.0
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  26. Robert C. Worrest, Bruce E. Thomson & Henry van Dyke (1981). Impact of Simulated Solar UV Radiation Upon Marine Communities. BioScience 31 (5):393-395.score: 28.0
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  27. Elder Paul V. Johnson, Blair G. Van Dyke, Jared M. Halverson, Sidney R. Sandstrom, Eric-Jon K. Marlowe, John Hilton Iii, Jordan Tanner, Nick Eastmond, Clyde L. Livingston & A. Paul King (2008). The Parable of the Sower Beneath the Surface of Multicultural Issues The Narrow Neck of Land. Religious Studies 9 (3).score: 28.0
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  28. Blair G. Van Dyke & E. Vance Randall (2002). Educational Reform in Post-Accord Palestine: A Synthesis of Palestinian Perspectives. Educational Studies 28 (1):17-32.score: 28.0
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  29. Christina Van Dyke (2008). Joseph Pilsner, The Specification of Human Actions in St Thomas Aquinas. (Oxford Theological Monographs.) Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 2006. Pp. Xi, 273. [REVIEW] Speculum 83 (1):233-234.score: 28.0
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  30. Christina Van Dyke (2006). Knuuttila, S. -Emotions in Ancient and Medieval Philosophy. Philosophical Books 47 (2):155-157.score: 28.0
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  31. C. van Dyke (2004). The Cambridge Translations of Medieval Philosophical Texts, Vol. 3: Mind and Knowledge. Philosophical Review 113 (4):567-571.score: 28.0
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  32. Christina Van Dyke (2004). The Cambridge Translations of Medieval Philosophical Texts, Vol. 3. Philosophical Review 113 (4):567-571.score: 28.0
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  33. Richard L. Lewis, Shravan Vasishth & Julie A. Van Dyke (2006). Computational Principles of Working Memory in Sentence Comprehension. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 10 (10):447-454.score: 28.0
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  34. H. Van Dyke Parunak (1996). Applications of Distributed Artificial Intelligence in Industry. In N. Jennings & G. O'Hare (eds.), Foundations of Distributed Artificial Intelligence. Wiley. 139-164.score: 28.0
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  35. Robert Pasnau & Christina Van Dyke (eds.) (2010). The Cambridge History of Medieval Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.score: 28.0
  36. Julie A. Van Dyke Richard L. Lewis, Shravan Vasishth (2006). Computational Principles of Working Memory in Sentence Comprehension. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 10 (10):447.score: 28.0
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  37. V. van Dyke (1995). Collective Entities and Moral Rights. In Julia Stapleton (ed.), Group Rights: Perspectives Since 1900. Thoemmes Press.score: 28.0
     
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  38. Christina Van Dyke (2008). K. J. Clark (Ed.) Readings in the Philosophy of Religion, 2nd Edition (Peterborough: Broadview Press, 2008).score: 28.0
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  39. Julie A. Van Dyke, Clinton L. Johns & Anuenue Kukona (2014). Low Working Memory Capacity is Only Spuriously Related to Poor Reading Comprehension. Cognition 131 (3):373-403.score: 28.0
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  40. Christina Van Dyke (2012). The Hunger Games and Philosophy.score: 28.0
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  41. Peter Hawke (2011). Van Inwagen's Modal Skepticism. Philosophical Studies 153 (3):351-364.score: 24.0
    In this paper, the author defends Peter van Inwagen’s modal skepticism. Van Inwagen accepts that we have much basic, everyday modal knowledge, but denies that we have the capacity to justify philosophically interesting modal claims that are far removed from this basic knowledge. The author also defends the argument by means of which van Inwagen supports his modal skepticism, offering a rebuttal to an objection along the lines of that proposed by Geirrson. Van Inwagen argues that Stephen Yablo’s recent and (...)
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  42. Marc Alspector-Kelly (2004). Seeing the Unobservable: Van Fraassen and the Limits of Experience. [REVIEW] Synthese 140 (3):331-353.score: 24.0
    I. Introduction “We can and do see the truth about many things: ourselves, others, trees and animals, clouds and rivers—in the immediacy of experience.”1 Absent from Bas van Fraassen’s list of those things we see are paramecia and mitochondria. We do not see such things, van Fraassen has long maintained, because they are unobservable, that is, they are undetectable by means of the unaided senses.2 But notice that these two notions—what we can see in the “immediacy” of experience and what (...)
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  43. Federica Russo (2006). Salmon and Van Fraassen on the Existence of Unobservable Entities: A Matter of Interpretation of Probability. [REVIEW] Foundations of Science 11 (3):221-247.score: 24.0
    A careful analysis of Salmon’s Theoretical Realism and van Fraassen’s Constructive Empiricism shows that both share a common origin: the requirement of literal construal of theories inherited by the Standard View. However, despite this common starting point, Salmon and van Fraassen strongly disagree on the existence of unobservable entities. I argue that their different ontological commitment towards the existence of unobservables traces back to their different views on the interpretation of probability via different conceptions of induction. In fact, inferences to (...)
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  44. Meghan E. Griffith (2005). Does Free Will Remain a Mystery? A Response to Van Inwagen. Philosophical Studies 124 (3):261-269.score: 24.0
    In this paper, I argue against Peter van Inwagen’s claim (in “Free Will Remains a Mystery”), that agent-causal views of free will could do nothing to solve the problem of free will (specifically, the problem of chanciness). After explaining van Inwagen’s argument, I argue that he does not consider all possible manifestations of the agent-causal position. More importantly, I claim that, in any case, van Inwagen appears to have mischaracterized the problem in some crucial ways. Once we are clear on (...)
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  45. Peter van Inwagen (2004). Van Inwagen on Free Will. In Joseph K. Campbell (ed.), Freedom and Determinism. Cambridge MA: Bradford Book/MIT Press.score: 24.0
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  46. Michael Huemer (2000). Van Inwagen's Consequence Argument. Philosophical Review 109 (4):525-544.score: 24.0
    Peter van Inwagen’s argument for incompatibilism uses a sentential operator, “N”, which can be read as “No one has any choice about the fact that . . . .” I show that, given van Inwagen’s understanding of the notion of having a choice, the argument is invalid. However, a different interpretation of “N” can be given, such that the argument is clearly valid, the premises remain highly plausible, and the conclusion implies that free will is incompatible with determinism.
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  47. Silvio Seno Chibeni (2008). Explanations in Microphysics: A Response to van Fraassen's Argument. Principia 12 (1):49-72.score: 24.0
    http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/1808-1711.2008v12n1p49 The aim of this article is to offer a rejoinder to an argument against scientific realism put forward by van Fraassen, based on theoretical considerations regarding microphysics. At a certain stage of his general attack to scientific realism, van Fraassen argues, in contrast to what realists typically hold, that empirical regularities should sometimes be regarded as “brute facts”, which do not ask for explanation in terms of deeper, unobservable mechanisms. The argument from microphysics formulated by van Fraassen is based (...)
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  48. Janez Bregant (2004). Van Gulick's Solution of the Exclusion Problem Revisited. Acta Analytica 19 (33):83-94.score: 24.0
    The anti-reductionist who wants to preserve the causal efficacy of mental phenomena faces several problems in regard to mental causation, i.e. mental events which cause other events, arising from her desire to accept the ontological primacy of the physical and at the same time save the special character of the mental. Psychology tries to persuade us of the former, appealing thereby to the results of experiments carried out in neurology; the latter is, however, deeply rooted in our everyday actions and (...)
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  49. John Martin Fischer (1986). Van Inwagen on Free Will. Philosophical Quarterly 36 (April):252-260.score: 24.0
    I discuss van inwagen's "first formal argument" for the incompatibility of causal determinism and freedom to do otherwise. I distinguish different interpretations of the important notion, "s can render p false." I argue that on none of these interpretations is the argument clearly sound. I point to gaps in the argument, Although I do not claim that it is unsound.
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  50. Mitchell O. Stokes (2007). Van Inwagen and the Quine-Putnam Indispensability Argument. Erkenntnis 67 (3):439 - 453.score: 24.0
    In this paper I do two things: (1) I support the claim that there is still some confusion about just what the Quine-Putnam indispensability argument is and the way it employs Quinean meta-ontology and (2) I try to dispel some of this confusion by presenting the argument in a way which reveals its important meta-ontological features, and include these features explicitly as premises. As a means to these ends, I compare Peter van Inwagen’s argument for the existence of properties with (...)
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