Search results for 'Vernon W. Grant' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Vernon W. Grant (1974). The Roots of Religious Doubt and the Search for Security. New York,Seabury Press.
     
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  2. Ruth W. Grant (1999). Hypocrisy and Integrity: Machiavelli, Rousseau, and the Ethics of Politics. University of Chicago Press.
    Questioning the usual judgements of political ethics, Ruth W. Grant argues that hypocrisy can actually be constructive while strictly principled behavior can be destructive. _Hypocrisy and Integrity_ offers a new conceptual framework that clarifies the differences between idealism and fanaticism while it uncovers the moral limits of compromise. "Exciting and provocative.... Grant's work is to be highly recommended, offering a fresh reading of Rousseau and Machiavelli as well as presenting a penetrating analysis of hypocrisy and integrity."—Ronald J. Terchek, (...)
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  3.  7
    Michael Grant (1955). Augustan History and Numismatics H. R. W. Smith: Problems Historical and Numismatic in the Reign of Augustus. (Publications in Classical Archaeology, Vol. 2, No. 4.) Pp. X + 98; 6 Plates, 2 Figs. Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press, 1951. Paper, $ 1. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 5 (02):187-189.
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  4.  4
    L. B. Grant (1958). Ciba Foundation Symposium on Extrasensory Perception. Editors G. E. W. Wolstenholme and Elaine C. P. Millar. With 3 Illustrations. (London: J. And A. Churchill Ltd. 1956. Pp. Ix + 240. Price 27s. 6d.). [REVIEW] Philosophy 33 (126):279-.
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  5.  1
    David A. Grant (1975). W. J. Brogden: The Experimentalist. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 6 (3):238-244.
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  6.  1
    George Grant (1962). Thought — From the Learned Societies of Canada. 1960. Toronto, W. J. Gage. 1961. Pp. 250. $5.00. [REVIEW] Dialogue 1 (1):100-101.
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  7. Edward Grant (1965). Commentary on Aristotle's Physics by St. Thomas Aquinas; Richard J. Blackwell; Richard J. Spath; W. Edmund Thirlkel. [REVIEW] Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 56:474-475.
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  8. Edward Grant (1997). The Measure of Reality: Quantification and Western Society, 1250-1600 by Alfred W. Crosby. [REVIEW] Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 88:531-531.
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  9.  49
    Ruth Weissbourd Grant (1997). Hypocrisy and Integrity: Machiavelli, Rousseau, and the Ethics of Politics. University of Chicago Press.
    Questioning the usual judgements of political ethics, Ruth W. Grant argues that hypocrisy can actually be constructive while strictly principled behavior can be destructive. Hypocrisy and Integrity offers a new conceptual framework that clarifies the differences between idealism and fanaticism while it uncovers the moral limits of compromise. "Exciting and provocative. . . . Grant's work is to be highly recommended, offering a fresh reading of Rousseau and Machiavelli as well as presenting a penetrating analysis of hypocrisy and (...)
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  10.  15
    Isaiah Berlin, P. F. Strawson, R. Rhees, F. E. Sparshott, Michael Scriven, R. F. Holland, Jonathan Harrison, H. G. Alexander, C. A. Mace, J. L. Evans, D. A. Rees, W. Mays, C. K. Grant, Basil Mitchell & G. C. J. Midgley (1952). New Books. [REVIEW] Mind 61 (243):405-439.
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  11.  1
    Harold W. Hake, David A. Grant & John P. Hornseth (1951). Resistance to Extinction and the Pattern of Reinforcement: III. The Effect of Trial Patterning in Verbal "Conditioning.". Journal of Experimental Psychology 41 (3):221.
  12. Harold W. Hake & David A. Grant (1951). Resistance to Extinction and the Pattern of Reinforcement: II. Effect of Successive Alternation of Blocks of Reinforced and Unreinforced Trials Upon the Conditioned Eyelid Response to Light. Journal of Experimental Psychology 41 (3):216.
  13.  10
    W. Matthews Grant (2016). The Privation Solution. Faith and Philosophy 33 (2):223-234.
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  14.  10
    W. Matthews Grant (forthcoming). The Privation Solution in Advance. Faith and Philosophy.
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  15.  1
    Ruth W. Grant (2011). Strings Attached: Untangling the Ethics of Incentives. Princeton University Press.
    Readers of this book are sure to view the ethics of incentives in a new light.
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  16.  27
    Ruth W. Grant & Jeremy Sugarman (2004). Ethics in Human Subjects Research: Do Incentives Matter? Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 29 (6):717 – 738.
    There is considerable confusion regarding the ethical appropriateness of using incentives in research with human subjects. Previous work on determining whether incentives are unethical considers them as a form of undue influence or coercive offer. We understand the ethical issue of undue influence as an issue, not of coercion, but of corruption of judgment. By doing so we find that, for the most part, the use of incentives to recruit and retain research subjects is innocuous. But there are some instances (...)
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  17.  19
    Eugene W. Grant & Lowell S. Broom (1988). Attitudes Toward Ethics: A View of the College Student. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 7 (8):617 - 619.
    This study investigated the differences in responses of undergraduate business students to an ethical dilemma. Demographic characteristics were collected on the respondents and profiled as a means of examining common bases for decision. The authors found that certain demographic characteristics appear to be predictors of ethical decision behavior of future businessmen.
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  18. C. D. Broad, Richard Robinson, H. B. Acton, George E. Hughes, T. D. Weldon, Mario M. Rossi, A. C. Ewing, C. J. Holloway, J. P. Corbett, C. W. K. Mundle, W. B. Gallie, W. Mays, A. H. Armstrong, C. K. Grant & I. M. Cromble (1949). New Books. [REVIEW] Mind 58 (229):101-130.
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  19. W. Charlton, Aurel Kolnai, C. K. Grant, Martin Hollis, J. M. Hinton, P. L. Mott, K. K. Baublys, Y. N. Chopra, G. R. Grice, R. F. Atkinson, Christine Atkinson & Stuart C. Brown (1973). New Books. [REVIEW] Mind 82 (327):452-479.
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  20. J. Gosling, Alan R. White, John Arthur Passmore, William Kneale, Don Locke, C. K. Grant, Thomas McPherson, Peter Nidditch, Martha Kneale, A. C. Ewing & W. F. Hicken (1965). New Books. [REVIEW] Mind 74 (293):126-153.
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  21.  8
    W. Matthews Grant & Mark K. Spencer (2015). Activity, Identity, and God. Studia Neoaristotelica 12 (2):5-61.
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  22.  30
    Ruth W. Grant (2002). The Ethics of Incentives: Historical Origins and Contemporary Understandings. Economics and Philosophy 18 (1):111-139.
    Increasingly in the modern world, incentives are becoming the tool we reach for when we wish to bring about change. In government, in education, in health care, between and within institutions of all sorts, incentives are offered to steer people's choices in certain directions. But despite the increasing interest in ethics and economics, the ethics of the use of incentives has raised very little concern. From a certain point of view, this is not surprising. When incentives are viewed from the (...)
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  23.  11
    W. Matthews Grant (2015). The Privation Account of Moral Evil. International Philosophical Quarterly 55 (3):271-286.
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  24.  14
    W. Matthews Grant (2000). Providence and the Problem of Evil. International Philosophical Quarterly 40 (1):115-117.
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  25.  69
    W. Matthews Grant (2003). Aquinas, Divine Simplicity, and Divine Freedom. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 77:129-144.
    Aquinas maintains that, although God created the universe, he could have created another or simply refrained from creating altogether. That Aquinas believesin divine free choice is uncontroversial. Yet doubts have been raised as to whether Thomas is entitled to this belief, given his claims concerning divine simplicity.According to simplicity, there is no potentiality in God, nor is there a distinction in God between God’s willing, His essence, and His necessary being. On the surface, it appears that these claims leave no (...)
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  26.  6
    Ruth W. Grant (2015). Rethinking the Ethics of Incentives. Journal of Economic Methodology 22 (3):354-372.
    Incentives are typically conceived as a form of trade, and so voluntariness appears to be the only ethical concern. As a consequence, incentives are often considered ethically superior to regulations because they are voluntary rather than coercive. But incentives can also be viewed as one way to get others to do what they otherwise would not; that is, as a form of power. When incentives are viewed in this light, many ethical questions arise in addition to voluntariness: What are the (...)
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  27.  4
    Philip W. Grant (1978). The Completeness of Lω1, Ω. Zeitschrift fur mathematische Logik und Grundlagen der Mathematik 24 (19-24):357-364.
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  28.  72
    Ruth W. Grant (2002). Political Theory, Political Science, and Politics. Political Theory 30 (4):577-595.
  29.  23
    W. Matthews Grant (2014). Hugh J. McCann: Creation and the Sovereignty of God. [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 75 (2):179-182.
  30.  26
    W. Matthews Grant (2012). Divine Simplicity, Contingent Truths, and Extrinsic Models of Divine Knowing. Faith and Philosophy 29 (3):254-274.
    A well-known objection to divine simplicity holds that the doctrine is incompatible with God’s contingent knowledge. I set out the objection and reject two problematic solutions. I then argue that the objection is best answered by adopting an “extrinsic model of divine knowing” according to which God’s contingent knowledge, which varies across worlds, does not involve any intrinsic variation in God. Solutions along these lines have been suggested by others. This paper advances the discussion by developing and offering partial defenses (...)
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  31.  36
    W. Matthews Grant (2010). Can a Libertarian Hold That Our Free Acts Are Caused by God? Faith and Philosophy 27 (1):22-44.
    According to prevailing opinion, if a creaturely act is caused by God, then it cannot be free in the libertarian sense. I argue to the contrary. I distinguish intrinsic and extrinsic models of divine causal agency. I then show that, given the extrinsic model, there is no reason one holding that our free acts are caused by God could not also hold a libertarian account of human freedom. It follows that a libertarian account of human freedom is consistent with God’s (...)
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  32.  8
    W. Matthews Grant (2006). The Science of God: An Introduction to Scientific Theology. Review of Metaphysics 60 (1):166-168.
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  33.  7
    W. Matthews Grant (2012). Divine Simplicity, Contingent Truths, and Extrinsic Models of Divine Knowing. Faith and Philosophy 29 (3):254-274.
    A well-known objection to divine simplicity holds that the doctrine is incompatible with God’s contingent knowledge. I set out the objection and reject two problematic solutions. I then argue that the objection is best answered by adopting an “extrinsic model of divine knowing” according to which God’s contingent knowledge, which varies across worlds, does not involve any intrinsic variation in God. Solutions along these lines have been suggested by others. This paper advances the discussion by developing and offering partial defenses (...)
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  34. C. C. Grant, R. Bengis, D. Balfour, M. Peel, W. Davies-Mostert, H. Killian, R. Little, I. Smit, M. Garai & M. Henley (2008). Controlling the Distribution of Elephants. In R. J. Scholes & K. G. Mennell (eds.), Elephant Management: A Scientific Assessment for South Africa. Wits University Press
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  35. W. Matthews Grant (2009). Aquinas on How God Causes the Act of Sin Without Causing Sin Itself. The Thomist 73 (3):455-496.
     
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  36.  6
    W. Matthews Grant (2006). Scholastic Meditations. International Philosophical Quarterly 46 (3):379-381.
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  37.  11
    C. H. Whiteley, C. K. Grant, Alan Montefiore, Ronald W. Hepburn, H. J. Paton, P. H. Nowell-Smith, A. D. Woozley & J. A. Faris (1959). New Books. [REVIEW] Mind 68 (272):556-574.
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  38.  3
    Julie L. Earles, Alan W. Kersten, Laura L. Vernon & Rachel Starkings (2016). Memory for Positive, Negative and Neutral Events in Younger and Older Adults: Does Emotion Influence Binding in Event Memory? Cognition and Emotion 30 (2):378-388.
  39.  23
    W. Matthews Grant (2001). Aquinas Among Libertarians and Compatibilists. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 75:221-235.
    Aquinas teaches that human acts are caused by God. Assuming that such causation entails theological determinism, philosophers with libertarian intuitions tend either to read around Aquinas’s teaching on the relation of divine causality and human action, or to reject that teaching altogether. Unfortunately, the arguments most often used by Aquinas and his contemporary defenders to show that his teaching is compatible with human freedom fail to address thelibertarian’s main concerns. In part one of this essay, I consider these arguments and (...)
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  40.  6
    Ken W. Grant (1999). Hearing by Eye II: Advances in the Psychology of Speechreading and Auditory–Visual Speech, Edited by Ruth Campbell, Barbara Dodd, and Denis Burnham. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 3 (8):319-320.
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  41.  4
    V. W. Grant (1942). Accommodation and Convergence in Visual Space Perception. Journal of Experimental Psychology 31 (2):89.
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  42.  15
    W. Matthews Grant (2000). Counterfactuals of Freedom, Future Contingents, and the Grounding Objection to Middle Knowledge. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 74:307-323.
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  43.  3
    W. Leonard Grant (1947). Correspondence. The Classical Review 61 (3-4):133-.
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  44.  13
    W. Matthews Grant (2004). Atheism, Morality, and Meaning. International Philosophical Quarterly 44 (1):128-130.
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  45.  6
    Philip W. Grant (1977). Strict-Π11 Predicates on Countable and Cofinality Ω Transitive Sets. Journal of Symbolic Logic 42 (2):161 - 173.
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  46.  21
    W. Matthews Grant (2007). Must a Cause Be Really Related to its Effect? The Analogy Between Divine and Libertarian Agent Causality. Religious Studies 43 (1):1-23.
    According to a classical teaching, God is not really related to creatures even by virtue of creating them. Some have objected that this teaching makes unintelligible the claim that God causally accounts for the universe, since God would be the same whether the universe existed or not. I defend the classical teaching, showing how the doctrine is implied by a popular cosmological argument, showing that the objection to it would also rule out libertarian agent causality, and showing that the objection (...)
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  47.  18
    Ruth W. Grant (1994). Integrity and Politics: An Alternative Reading of Rousseau. Political Theory 22 (3):414-443.
  48.  2
    W. Leonard Grant (1947). Cicero, Ad Fam. Viii. 8. 9. The Classical Review 61 (01):10-11.
  49.  9
    Ruth W. Grant (2000). Response to NASSP Book Award Panel. Social Philosophy Today 15:445-452.
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  50.  4
    I. T. Ramsey, Everett W. Hall, H. H. Price, D. R. Cousin & C. K. Grant (1955). New Books. [REVIEW] Mind 64 (253):110-122.
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