Search results for 'Veterinary Medicine ethics' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Henrik Lerner & Bjørn Hofmann (2011). Normality and Naturalness: A Comparison of the Meanings of Concepts Used Within Veterinary Medicine and Human Medicine. [REVIEW] Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 32 (6):403-412.score: 87.0
    This article analyses the different connotations of “normality” and “being natural,” bringing together the theoretical discussion from both human medicine and veterinary medicine. We show how the interpretations of the concepts in the different areas could be mutually fruitful. It appears that the conceptions of “natural” are more elaborate in veterinary medicine, and can be of value to human medicine. In particular they can nuance and correct conceptions of nature in human medicine that (...)
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  2. Bjørn Hofmann (2003). Technological Paternalism: On How Medicine has Reformed Ethics and How Technology Can Refine Moral Theory. Science and Engineering Ethics 9 (3):343-352.score: 75.0
    The objective of this article is to investigate ethical aspects of technology through the moral term “paternalism”. The field of investigation is medicine. The reason for this is twofold. Firstly, “paternalism” has gained moral relevance through modern medicine, where physicians have been accused of behaving paternalistic and threatening patients’ autonomy. Secondly, medicine is a brilliant area to scrutinise the evaluative aspects of technology. It is argued that paternalism is a morally relevant term for the ethics of (...)
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  3. Stefan Konstanczak & Bogna Choinska (2011). Professional Ethics in Polish Medicine. Ethics and Bioethics (in Central Europe) 1 (1-2):14-20.score: 75.0
    Justifying the existence of professional ethics in medicine is usually connected with the traditions of a profession and with a humanistic dimension of these ethics, pointing at the same time to their culture-forming character. With such an attitude, professional ethics is treated as a part of all mankind’s output, and its teaching turns out to be an important element of preparation for taking part in culture. Taking into account the cultural meaning of professional ethics, one (...)
     
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  4. Sophie Pellé & Vanessa Nurock (2012). Of Nanochips and Persons: Toward an Ethics of Diagnostic Technology in Personalized Medicine. [REVIEW] Nanoethics 6 (3):155-165.score: 72.0
    This paper proposes an ethical reflection on personalized medicine and more precisely on the diagnostic technology underlying it, including nanochips. Our approach is inspired by a combination of two philosophical frames of reference: first, John Dewey’s distinction between intuitive valuation and reflexive evaluation, second, John Rawls’ reflective equilibrium. We aim at what we call a ‘reflexive equilibrium’, a mutual adjustment between on the one hand, the intuitive beliefs scientists have about the ethics of the technologies they work on (...)
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  5. M. Therese Lysaught (ed.) (2012). On Moral Medicine: Theological Perspectives in Medical Ethics. W.B. Eerdmans Pub. Co..score: 72.0
    This third edition updates and expands the earlier award-winning volumes, providing classrooms and individuals alike with one of the finest available resources for ethics-engaged modern medicine.
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  6. Kenneth De Ville (1998). Act First and Look Up the Law Afterward?: Medical Malpractice and the Ethics of Defensive Medicine. [REVIEW] Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 19 (6):569-589.score: 69.0
    This essay examines the so-called phenomenon of defensive medicine and the problematic aspects of attempting to maintain the safest legal position possible. While physicians face genuine litigation threats they frequently overestimate legal peril. Many defensive practices are benign, but others alter patient care and increase costs in ways that are ethically suspect. Physicians should learn to evaluate realistically the legal risks of their profession and weigh the emotional, physical, and financial costs to the patient before employing a defensive measure.
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  7. James Yeates (2013). Animal Welfare in Veterinary Practice. Wiley-Blackwell.score: 69.0
    Patients -- Clients -- Welfare assessment -- Clinical choices -- Achieving animal welfare goals -- Beyond the clinic.
     
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  8. Hilde Lindemann (1995). The Patient in the Family: An Ethics of Medicine and Families. Routledge.score: 67.0
    Medicine and families, two venerable institutions crucial to human well-being, are in crisis. The medical profession, struggling to control and equitably distribute care, finds itself compromised by its own success; families are shattered by divorce, violence and confusion about their own nature. What has gone unnoticed is the way these two powerful and pervasive spheres contribute to each other's loss of direction. The Patient in the Family diagnoses the ways in which the worlds of home and hospital misunderstand each (...)
     
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  9. Piersante Sestini (2010). Epistemology and Ethics of Evidence-Based Medicine: Putting Goal-Setting in the Right Place. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 16 (2):301-305.score: 66.0
    While evidence-based medicine (EBM) is often accused on relying on a paradigm of 'absolute truth', it is in fact highly consistent with Karl Popper's criterion of demarcation through falsification. Even more relevant, the first three steps of the EBM process are closely patterned on Popper's evolutionary approach of objective knowledge: (1) recognition of a problem; (2) generation of solutions; and (3) selection of the best solution. This places the step 1 of the EBM process (building an answerable question) in (...)
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  10. Thomas Stephen Szasz (1977/1988). The Theology of Medicine: The Political-Philosophical Foundations of Medical Ethics. Syracuse University Press.score: 63.0
    The essays assembled in this volume reflect my long-standing interest in moral philosophy and my conviction that the idea of a medical ethics as something ...
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  11. Stephen E. Lammers & Allen Verhey (eds.) (1998). On Moral Medicine: Theological Perspectives in Medical Ethics. William B. Eerdmans Pub..score: 63.0
    Collecting a wide range of contemporary and classical theological essays dealing with medical ethics, this volume is the finest resource available for engaging ...
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  12. Gjalt de Graaf (2005). Veterinarians' Discourses on Animals and Clients. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 18 (6):557-578.score: 61.0
    Veterinarians have obligations towards both the animals they treat and their clients, the owners of the animals. With both groups, veterinarians have complicated relations; many times the interests of both groups conflict. In this article, using Q-methodology as a method for discourse analysis, the following question is answered: How do Dutch practicing veterinarians conceptualize animals and their owners and their professional responsibility towards both? The main part of the article contains descriptions of four different discourses on animals and their owners (...)
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  13. Sonal Singh (2007). Book Review of "The Ethics of Coercion in Mass Casualty Medicine" by Griffin Trotter MD, PhD. [REVIEW] Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 2 (1):20-.score: 60.0
    Public health ethics is neither taught widely in medical schools or schools of public health in the US or around the world. It is not surprising that health care professionals are particularly challenged when faced with ethical questions which extend beyond safeguarding the interests of their individual patients to matters that affect overall public good. The perceived threat of terror after September 11 2007, the anthrax attacks and the Katrina debacle are recent circumstances which may result in coercion. These (...)
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  14. Michael Loughlin, Ross E. G. Upshur, Maya J. Goldenberg, Robyn Bluhm & Kirstin Borgerson (2010). Philosophy, Ethics, Medicine and Health Care: The Urgent Need for Critical Practice. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 16 (2):249-259.score: 60.0
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  15. M. Gupta (2004). Reconsidering Rationality and Ethics in the Evidence‐Based Medicine Debate: A Reply to Commentators. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 10 (2):143-146.score: 60.0
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  16. Michael Gelfand (1968). Philosophy and Ethics of Medicine. London, E. & S. Livingstone.score: 60.0
     
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  17. Fred Rosner (1991). Modern Medicine and Jewish Ethics. Yeshiva University Press.score: 60.0
     
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  18. C. Gordon Scorer & Antony John Wing (eds.) (1979). Decision Making in Medicine: The Practice of its Ethics. E. Arnold.score: 60.0
     
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  19. Ulrich Tröhler, Stella Reiter-Theil & Eckhard Herych (eds.) (1998). Ethics Codes in Medicine: Foundations and Achievements of Codification Since 1947. Ashgate Pub..score: 60.0
     
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  20. Kenneth L. Vaux (1974). Biomedical Ethics; Morality for the New Medicine. New York,Harper & Row.score: 60.0
     
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  21. R. D. Orr & L. B. Genesen (1998). Medicine, Ethics and Religion: Rational or Irrational? Journal of Medical Ethics 24 (6):385-387.score: 59.0
    Savulescu maintains that our paper, which encourages clinicians to honour requests for "inappropriate treatment" is prejudicial to his atheistic beliefs, and therefore wrong. In this paper we clarify and expand on our ideas, and respond to his assertion that medicine, ethics and atheism are objective, rational and true, while religion is irrational and false.
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  22. Marcel Mertz (2007). Complementary and Alternative Medicine: The Challenges of Ethical Justification. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 10 (3):329-345.score: 58.3
    With the prevalence of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) increasing in western societies, questions of the ethical justification of these alternative health care approaches and practices have to be addressed. In order to evaluate philosophical reasoning on this subject, it is of paramount importance to identify and analyse possible arguments for the ethical justification of CAM considering contemporary biomedical ethics as well as more fundamental philosophical aspects. Moreover, it is vital to provide adequate analytical instruments for this task, (...)
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  23. Eugenijus Gefenas (2007). Balancing Ethical Principles in Emergency Medicine Research. Science and Engineering Ethics 13 (3):281-288.score: 57.0
    This paper attempts to provide a broader view into the ethical issues surrounding the field of emergency medicine (EM) research. It starts from defining bioethically relevant features of EM and presents this field in the context of different models of health care provider–patient relationship. The paper also provides a short overview of the “post-Nuremberg” evolution of the main international research ethics guidelines relevant to EM research which demonstrates a tendency of liberalization of research on incapable persons. This tendency (...)
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  24. D. S. Schultz & L. V. Flasher (2011). Charles Taylor, Phronesis, and Medicine: Ethics and Interpretation in Illness Narrative. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 36 (4):394-409.score: 57.0
    This paper provides a brief overview and critique of the dominant objectivist understanding and use of illness narrative in Enlightenment (scientific) medicine and ethics, as well as several revisionist accounts, which reflect the evolution of this approach. In light of certain limitations and difficulties endemic in the objectivist understanding of illness narrative, an alternative phronesis approach to medical ethics influenced by Charles Taylor’s account of the interpretive nature of human agency and language is examined. To this end, (...)
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  25. Jeff Blackmer (2003). The Unique Ethical Challenges of Conducting Research in the Rehabilitation Medicine Population. BMC Medical Ethics 4 (1):1-6.score: 57.0
    Background The broad topic of research ethics is one which has been relatively well-investigated and discussed. Unique ethical issues have been identified for such populations as pediatrics, where the issues of consent and assent have received much attention, and obstetrics, with concerns such as the potential for research to cause harm to the fetus. However, little has been written about ethical concerns which are relatively unique to the population of patients seen by the practitioner of rehabilitation medicine. Discussion (...)
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  26. John C. Moskop (1981). Medicine, Ethics and the Living Body: A Response to Thomasma and Pellegrino. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 2 (1):19-25.score: 57.0
    This commentary, while sympathetic to Thomasma and Pellegrino [15], raises three sets of questions concerning the adequacy of their view of medicine as a foundation for medical ethical decision-making. The first set of questions concerns the account of the nature of medicine presented by Thomasma and Pellegrino. It is argued that the account is not clearly univocal and that even the most important description offered requires further clarification. Questioned, secondly, is the reasoning used by Thomasma and Pellegrino to (...)
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  27. Larissa Adler Lomnitz & Leticia Mayer (1994). Veterinary Medicine and Animal Husbandry in Mexico: From Empiricism to Science and Technology. [REVIEW] Minerva 32 (2):144-157.score: 56.0
    Foot-and-mouth disease was the event which led to the increased and improved training of veterinarians able to produce through their research new veterinary knowledge for practical application.It led to the transformation of the Mexican veterinary profession. It changed the kind of knowledge veterinarians received at university, and it also changed the work they did as professionals. Veterinarians gradually began to perform a much wider range of tasks: they did research, taught, worked as civil servants, or assumed positions as (...)
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  28. Steven H. Miles (2004). The Hippocratic Oath and the Ethics of Medicine. Oxford University Press.score: 54.0
    This short work examines what the Hippocratic Oath said to Greek physicians 2400 years ago and reflects on its relevance to medical ethics today. Drawing on the writings of ancient physicians, Greek playwrights, and modern scholars, each chapter explores one passage of the Oath and concludes with a modern case discussion. This book is for anyone who loves medicine and is concerned about the ethics and history of the profession.
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  29. Maria Rita Garbi Novaes, Dirce Guilhem, Elena Barragan & Stewart Mennin (2013). Ethics Education in Research Involving Human Beings in Undergraduate Medicine Curriculum in Brazil. Developing World Bioethics 13 (3):163-168.score: 54.0
    Introduction The Brazilian national curriculum guidelines for undergraduate medicine courses inspired and influenced the groundwork for knowledge acquisition, skills development and the perception of ethical values in the context of professional conduct. Objective The evaluation of ethics education in research involving human beings in undergraduate medicine curriculum in Brazil, both in courses with active learning processes and in those with traditional lecture learning methodologies. Methods Curricula and teaching projects of 175 Brazilian medical schools were analyzed using a (...)
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  30. Ronald J. Christie (1986). Ethical Issues in Family Medicine. Oxford University Press.score: 54.0
    While ethicists have directed much attention to controversial biomedical issues--including euthanasia, abortion, and genetic engineering--they have largely ignored the less obvious, but more pervasive, everyday ethical problems faced by family physicians. Ethical Issues in Family Medicine addresses these problems, offering an ethics that reflects the distinctive features of family practice, and helping family physicians to appreciate the extent to which ethical issues influence their practice.
     
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  31. Rebecca J. Cook, Bernard M. Dickens & Mahmoud F. Fathalla (2003). Reproductive Health and Human Rights: Integrating Medicine, Ethics, and Law. Clarendon Press.score: 54.0
    The concept of reproductive health promises to play a crucial role in improving women's health and rights around the world. It was internationally endorsed by a United Nations conference in 1994, but remains controversial because of the challenge it presents to conservative agencies: it challenges policies of suppressing public discussion on human sexuality and regulating its private expressions. Reproductive Health and Human Rights is designed to equip healthcare providers and administrators to integrate ethical, legal, and human rights principles in protection (...)
     
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  32. Jingqing Yang (2010). Serve the People: Understanding Ideology and Professional Ethics of Medicine in China. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 18 (3):294-309.score: 54.0
    The article explores the communist ideology that has guided the formation of professional ethics of medicine in China. It first explores the constitutions of the People’s Republic of China and the Chinese Communist Party and codes of practice for medicine enforced since 1949, showing that the core of the ideology in relation to health provision and doctor–patient relationship has always been ‘serving the people wholeheartedly’. The ideological undertaking, however, has never been successfully exercised. In the pre-reform era, (...)
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  33. Pornpimon Adams, Waranya Wongwit, Krisana Pengsaa, Srisin Khusmith, Wijitr Fungladda, Warissara Chaiyaphan, Chanthima Limphattharacharoen, Sukanya Prakobtham & Jaranit Kaewkungwal (2013). Ethical Issues in Research Involving Minority Populations: The Process and Outcomes of Protocol Review by the Ethics Committee of the Faculty of Tropical Medicine, Mahidol University, Thailand. [REVIEW] BMC Medical Ethics 14 (1):33.score: 53.0
    Recruiting minorities into research studies requires special attention, particularly when studies involve “extra-vulnerable” participants with multiple vulnerabilities, e.g., pregnant women, the fetuses/neonates of ethnic minorities, children in refugee camps, or cross-border migrants. This study retrospectively analyzed submissions to the Ethics Committee of the Faculty of Tropical Medicine (FTM-EC) in Thailand. Issues related to the process and outcomes of proposal review, and the main issues for which clarification/revision were requested on studies, are discussed extensively.
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  34. D. Hill (1987). On Moral Medicine: Theological Perspectives in Medical Ethics. Journal of Medical Ethics 13 (4):220-221.score: 53.0
    Religion and medicine -- Theology and medical ethics -- The profession and its integrity -- Life and its sanctity -- Health and healing -- Death and its (in)dignity -- Nature and its mastery -- Care of patients and their suffering -- Respect for persons and their agency -- Contraception -- Technological reproduction -- Genetic control -- Abortion -- Choosing death and letting die -- Care of neonates -- The physician-patient relationship: advise and consent -- Psychiatric care: professional commitments (...)
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  35. Lara Huber & Lara Kutschenko (2009). Medicine in a Neurocentric World: About the Explanatory Power of Neuroscientific Models in Medical Research and Practice. [REVIEW] Medicine Studies 1 (4):307-313.score: 52.0
    Medicine in a Neurocentric World: About the Explanatory Power of Neuroscientific Models in Medical Research and Practice Content Type Journal Article Category Editorial Notes Pages 307-313 DOI 10.1007/s12376-009-0036-2 Authors Lara Huber, University Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz Institute for History, Philosophy and Ethics of Medicine Am Pulverturm 13 55131 Mainz Germany Lara K. Kutschenko, University Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz Institute for History, Philosophy and Ethics of Medicine (...)
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  36. Edmund D. Pellegrino (2001). The Internal Morality of Clinical Medicine: A Paradigm for the Ethics of the Helping and Healing Professions. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 26 (6):559 – 579.score: 51.0
    The moral authority for professional ethics in medicine customarily rests in some source external to medicine, i.e., a pre-existing philosophical system of ethics or some form of social construction, like consensus or dialogue. Rather, internal morality is grounded in the phenomena of medicine, i.e., in the nature of the clinical encounter between physician and patient. From this, a philosophy of medicine is derived which gives moral force to the duties, virtues and obligations of physicians (...)
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  37. David C. Thomasma & Edmund D. Pellegrino (1981). Philosophy of Medicine as the Source for Medical Ethics. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 2 (1):5-11.score: 51.0
    The article offers an approach to inquiry about, the foundation of medical ethics by addressing three areas of conceptual presupposition basic to medical ethical theory. First, medical ethics must presuppose a view about the nature of medicine. it is argued that the view required by a cogent medical morality entails that medicine be seen both as a healing relationship and as a practical art. Three ways in which medicine inherently involves values and valuation are presented (...)
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  38. Ren-Zong Qiu (1988). Medicine – the Art of Humaneness: On Ethics of Traditional Chinese Medicine. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 13 (3):277-299.score: 51.0
    This essay discusses the ethics of traditional Chinese medicine. After a brief remark on the history of traditional Chinese medical ethics, the author outlines the Confucian ethics which formed the cultural context in which traditional Chinese medicine was evolving and constituted the core of its ethics. Then he argued that how Chinese physicians applied the principles of Confucian ethics in medicine and prescribed the attitude a physician should take to himself, to patients (...)
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  39. John Worrall (2008). Evidence and Ethics in Medicine. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 51 (3):418-431.score: 51.0
    Ethics and epistemology in medicine are more closely and more interestingly intertwined than is usually recognized. To explore this relationship, I present a case study, clinical trials of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO; an intervention for persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn).Three separate ethical issues that arise from this case study-whether or not it is ethical to perform a certain trial at all, whether stopping rules for trials are ethically mandated, and the issue of informed consent-are all shown to (...)
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  40. Robert M. Veatch (2006). How Philosophy of Medicine has Changed Medical Ethics. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 31 (6):585 – 600.score: 51.0
    The celebration of thirty years of publication of The Journal of Medicine and Philosophy provides an opportunity to reflect on how medical ethics has evolved over that period. The reshaping of the field has occurred in no small part because of the impact of branches of philosophy other than ethics. These have included influences from Kantian theory of respect for persons, personal identity theory, philosophy of biology, linguistic analysis of the concepts of health and disease, personhood theory, (...)
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  41. Laurence B. McCullough (1981). Pluralism, Philosophies of Medicine and the Varieties of Medical Ethics: A Commentary on Thomasma and Pellegrino. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 2 (1):13-17.score: 51.0
    Some problems that arise in the account given by Thomasma and Pellegrino [6] of the foundations of medical ethics in a philosophy of medicine are addressed, in particular questions of a conceptual character about treating therelatum of medicine as health. Which concept of health is appropriate and which will bear the burden of the position thomasma and Pellegrino advance? It is argued that the proper relationship of medicine is one between a healer and developing embodied minds. (...)
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  42. Douwe Tiemersma (1987). Ontology and Ethics in the Foundation of Medicine and the Relevance of Levinas' View. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 2 (2).score: 51.0
    The search for an ontological basis of medical practice is questioned from the viewpoint that ontologies are always related to the interpreting person in his situation, and that the definition of medicine includes a certain choice. This choice-character comes into greater play when ethical proposals are made. A foundation of medical ethics on an ontology of the healthy body or the factual medical practice is a naturalistic fallacy. Prior to an ontological basis, the ethical event of responsibility for (...)
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  43. Kenneth V. Iserson (2007). Has Emergency Medicine Research Benefited Patients? An Ethical Question. Science and Engineering Ethics 13 (3):289-295.score: 51.0
    From an ethical standpoint, the goal of clinical research is to benefit patients. While individual investigations may not yield results that directly improve patients’ evaluation or treatment, the corpus of the research should lead in that direction. Without the goal of ultimate benefit to patients, such research fails as a moral enterprise. While this may seem obvious, the need to protect and benefit patients can get lost in the milieu of clinical research. Many advances in emergency medicine have been (...)
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  44. David T. Ozar (1985). Social Ethics, the Philosophy of Medicine, and Professional Responsibility. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 6 (3).score: 51.0
    The social ethics of medicine is the study and ethical analysis of social structures which impact on the provision of health care by physicians. There are many such social structures. Not all these structures are responsive to the influence of physicians as health professionals. But some social structures which impact on health care are prompted by or supported by important preconceptions of medical practice. In this article, three such elements of the philosophy of medicine are examined in (...)
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  45. Marianne Boenink (2010). Molecular Medicine and Concepts of Disease: The Ethical Value of a Conceptual Analysis of Emerging Biomedical Technologies. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 13 (1):11-23.score: 51.0
    Although it is now generally acknowledged that new biomedical technologies often produce new definitions and sometimes even new concepts of disease, this observation is rarely used in research that anticipates potential ethical issues in emerging technologies. This article argues that it is useful to start with an analysis of implied concepts of disease when anticipating ethical issues of biomedical technologies. It shows, moreover, that it is possible to do so at an early stage, i.e. when a technology is only just (...)
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  46. L. A. Jansen (2013). Between Beneficence and Justice: The Ethics of Stewardship in Medicine. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 38 (1):50-63.score: 51.0
    In an era of rapidly rising health care costs, physicians and policymakers are searching for new and effective ways to contain health care spending without sacrificing the quality of services provided. These proposals are increasingly articulated in terms of an ethical duty of stewardship. The duty of stewardship in medicine, however, is not at present well understood, and it is frequently conflated with other duties. This article presents a critical analysis of the notion of stewardship, which shows that it (...)
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  47. R. Vos (2004). Coordinating the Norms and Values of Medical Research, Medical Practice and Patient Worlds—the Ethics of Evidence Based Medicine in Orphaned Fields of Medicine. Journal of Medical Ethics 30 (2):166-170.score: 51.0
    Next SectionEvidence based medicine is rightly at the core of current medicine. If patients and society put trust in medical professional competency, and on the basis of that competency delegate all kinds of responsibilities to the medical profession, medical professionals had better make sure their competency is state of the art medical science. What goes for the ethics of clinical trials goes for the ethics of medicine as a whole: anything that is scientifically doubtful is, (...)
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  48. Laurence B. McCullough (1998). A Transcultural, Preventive Ethics Approach to Critical-Care Medicine: Restoring the Critical Care Physician's Power and Authority. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 23 (6):628 – 642.score: 51.0
    This article comments on the treatment of critical-care ethics in four preceding articles about critical-care medicine and its ethical challenges in mainland China, Hong Kong, Japan, and the Philippines. These articles show how cultural values can be in both synchrony and conflict in generating these ethical challenges and in the constraints that they place on the response of critical-care ethics to them. To prevent ethical conflict in critical care the author proposes a two-step approach to the ethical (...)
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  49. A. A. Olukoya (1984). A Workshop on Medical Ethics at the College of Medicine, Lagos University. Journal of Medical Ethics 10 (4):199-200.score: 51.0
    As part of an effort to improve the teaching of medical ethics in the College of Medicine, Lagos University two-day workshops were organised. Participants included people from various walks of life, for example politicians, lawyers, doctors, and patients. The workshops were quite successful, and have led to more extensive teaching of medical ethics in the college.
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  50. Bram P. Wispelwey & Alan B. Jotkowitz (2013). To Repent or To Rationalize: Three Physicians Exchange Letters on the Ethics of Experimentation in Postwar Medicine. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 56 (2):236-243.score: 51.0
    On the 50th anniversary of the Willowbrook experiment's inception, in which Dr. Saul Krugman intentionally infected cognitively disabled children with hepatitis, it is worth reflecting on how our attitude toward research ethics of the past informs our current practices. In examining ethical violations in postwar medicine, we frequently turn to examples that shock and appall, thereby offering concomitant comfort as we measure their safe distance from our own medical context. And yet, which modern medical student has not heard (...)
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