Search results for 'Victor Margolis' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Victor Margolis (1995). The Plate Spinner: Playing with Time. Marik Pub..score: 240.0
     
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  2. Joseph Margolis (2009). On Aesthetics: An Unforgiving Introduction. Wadsworth.score: 60.0
    These books will prove valuable to philosophy teachers and their students as well as to other readers who share a general interest in philosophy. -/- What is art? Must art be beautiful? Must art be politically or culturally significant? How does art differ from other products of human activity? Joseph Margolis has spent decades thinking through these and related questions. In this book, he introduces his reader to the field of Aesthetics by thinking through the most fundamental philosophical questions (...)
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  3. John B. Cullen, K. Praveen Parboteeah & Bart Victor (2003). The Effects of Ethical Climates on Organizational Commitment: A Two-Study Analysis. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 46 (2):127 - 141.score: 60.0
    Although organizational commitment continues to interest researchers because of its positive effects on organizations, we know relatively little about the effects of the ethical context on organizational commitment. As such, we contribute to the organizational commitment field by assessing the effects of ethical climates (Victor and Cullen, 1987, 1988) on organizational commitment. We hypothesized that an ethical climate of benevolence has a positive relationship with organizational commitment while egoistic climate is negatively related to commitment. Results supported our propositions for (...)
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  4. Joseph Margolis (2003). The Unraveling of Scientism: American Philosophy at the End of the Twentieth Century. Cornell University Press.score: 60.0
    The Unraveling of Scientism, a companion to Joseph Margolis's Reinventing Pragmatism, follows the thread of American analytic philosophy through the second half ...
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  5. Eric Margolis & Stephen Laurence (1999). Where the Regress Argument Still Goes Wrong: Reply to Knowles. Analysis 59 (4):321-327.score: 60.0
    The Regress Argument is supposed to show that the language of thought hypothesis results in an infinite regress in its explanation of such things as learning, meaning, and understanding. Earlier (in Laurence & Margolis 1997) we argued that the Regress Argument doesn’t work and that even the language of thought’s supporters have given the Regress Argument far too much credit. In this paper, we respond to a critique of our earlier discussion.
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  6. Joseph Margolis (2004). Moral Philosophy After 9/11. Penn State University Press.score: 60.0
    Eschewing the resort to universal moral principles favored by traditional Anglo-American analytic philosophy, Joseph Margolis sets out to sketch an alternative approach that accepts the lack of any neutral ground or privileged normative ...
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  7. Stephen Laurence & Eric Margolis (2001). The Poverty of the Stimulus Argument. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 52 (2):217-276.score: 30.0
    Noam Chomsky's Poverty of the Stimulus Argument is one of the most famous and controversial arguments in the study of language and the mind. Though widely endorsed by linguists, the argument has met with much resistance in philosophy. Unfortunately, philosophical critics have often failed to fully appreciate the power of the argument. In this paper, we provide a systematic presentation of the Poverty of the Stimulus Argument, clarifying its structure, content, and evidential base. We defend the argument against a variety (...)
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  8. Stephen Laurence & Eric Margolis (2003). Concepts and Conceptual Analysis. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 67 (2):253-282.score: 30.0
    Conceptual analysis is undergoing a revival in philosophy, and much of the credit goes to Frank Jackson. Jackson argues that conceptual analysis is needed as an integral component of so-called serious metaphysics and that it also does explanatory work in accounting for such phenomena as categorization, meaning change, communication, and linguistic understanding. He even goes so far as to argue that opponents of concep- tual analysis are implicitly committed to it in practice. We show that he is wrong on all (...)
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  9. Eric Margolis & Stephen Laurence (2007). The Ontology of Concepts: Abstract Objects or Mental Representations? Noûs 41 (4):561-593.score: 30.0
    What is a concept? Philosophers have given many different answers to this question, reflecting a wide variety of approaches to the study of mind and language. Nonetheless, at the most general level, there are two dominant frameworks in contemporary philosophy. One proposes that concepts are mental representations, while the other proposes that they are abstract objects. This paper looks at the differences between these two approaches, the prospects for combining them, and the issues that are involved in the dispute. We (...)
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  10. Eric Margolis & Stephen Laurence, Concepts. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 30.0
    This entry provides an overview of theories of concepts that is organized around five philosophical issues: (1) the ontology of concepts, (2) the structure of concepts, (3) empiricism and nativism about concepts, (4) concepts and natural language, and (5) concepts and conceptual analysis.
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  11. Eric Margolis (1998). How to Acquire a Concept. Mind and Language 13 (3):347-369.score: 30.0
    In this paper, I develop a novel account of concept acquisition for an atomistic theory of concepts. Conceptual atomism is rarely explored in cognitive science because of the feeling that atomistic treatments of concepts are inherently nativistic. My model illustrates, on the contrary, that atomism does not preclude the learning of a concept.
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  12. Eric Margolis & Stephen Laurence (eds.) (1999). Concepts: Core Readings. MIT Press.score: 30.0
    The first part of the book centers around the fall of the Classical Theory of Concepts in the face of attacks by W. V. O. Quine, Ludwig Wittgenstein, Eleanor ...
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  13. Joseph Margolis (1998). Farewell to Danto and Goodman. British Journal of Aesthetics 38 (4):353-374.score: 30.0
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  14. Eric Margolis & Stephen Laurence (2003). Concepts. In Stephen P. Stich & Ted A. Warfield (eds.), Blackwell Guide to Philosophy of Mind. Blackwell.score: 30.0
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  15. Eric Margolis & Stephen Laurence (2001). Boghossian on Analyticity. Analysis 61 (4):293–302.score: 30.0
    In an important recent discussion of analyticity, Paul Boghossian (1997)1 argues for the following three claims: (i) While Quine’s well-known arguments against analyticity do undermine one type of analyticity (what Boghossian calls metaphysical analyticity), they fail to undermine another type (what he calls epistemic analyticity). (ii) Epistemic analyticity explains the a prioricity of logic and perhaps even the a prioricity of conceptual truths.
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  16. Joseph Margolis (1988). Minds, Selves, and Persons. Topoi 7 (March):31-45.score: 30.0
    There is a considerable effort in current theorizing about psychological phenomena to eliminate minds and selves as a vestige of folk theories. The pertinent strategies are quite varied and may focus on experience, cognition, interests, responsibility, behavior and the scientific explanation of these phenomena or what they purport to identify. The minimal function of the notion of self is to assign experience to a suitable entity and to fix such ascription in a possessive as well as a predicative way. It (...)
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  17. Eric Margolis & Stephen Laurence (2003). Should We Trust Our Intuitions? Deflationary Accounts of the Analytic Data. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 103 (3):299-323.score: 30.0
    At least since W. V. O. Quine's famous critique of the analytic/synthetic distinction, philosophers have been deeply divided over whether there are any analytic truths. One line of thought suggests that the simple fact that people have 'intuitions of analyticity' might provide an independent argument for analyticities. If defenders of analyticity can explain these intuitions and opponents cannot, then perhaps there are analyticities after all. We argue that opponents of analyticity have some unexpected resources for explaining these intuitions and that, (...)
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  18. Joseph Margolis (1977). The Ontological Peculiarity of Works of Art. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 36 (1):45-50.score: 30.0
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  19. Joseph Margolis (1976). Robust Relativism. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 35 (1):37-46.score: 30.0
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  20. Stephen Laurence & Eric Margolis (1997). Regress Arguments Against the Language of Thought. Analysis 57 (1):60-66.score: 30.0
    The Language of Thought Hypothesis is often taken to have the fatal flaw that it generates an explanatory regress. The language of thought is invoked to explain certain features of natural language (e.g., that it is learned, understood, and is meaningful), but, according to the regress argument, the language of thought itself has these same features and hence no explanatory progress has been made. We argue that such arguments rely on the tacit assumption that the entire motivation for the language (...)
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  21. Joseph Margolis (1963). Lying is Wrong" and "Lying is Not Always Wrong. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 23 (3):414-418.score: 30.0
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  22. Stephen Laurence & Eric Margolis (2003). Radical Concept Nativism. Cognition 86 (1):25-55.score: 30.0
    Radical concept nativism is the thesis that virtually all lexical concepts are innate. Notoriously endorsed by Jerry Fodor (1975, 1981), radical concept nativism has had few supporters. However, it has proven difficult to say exactly what’s wrong with Fodor’s argument. We show that previous responses are inadequate on a number of grounds. Chief among these is that they typically do not achieve sufficient distance from Fodor’s dialectic, and, as a result, they do not illuminate the central question of how new (...)
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  23. Joseph Margolis (1960). Aesthetic Perception. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 19 (2):209-213.score: 30.0
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  24. Eric Margolis & Stephen Laurence (eds.) (2007). Creations of the Mind: Theories of Artifacts and Their Representation. Oxford University Press.score: 30.0
    This volume will be a fascinating resource for philosophers, cognitive scientists, and psychologists, and the starting point for future research in the study of ...
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  25. Joseph Margolis (1974). Works of Art as Physically Embodied and Culturally Emergent Entities. British Journal of Aesthetics 14 (3):187-196.score: 30.0
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  26. Joseph Margolis (2007). Historicity and the Politics of Predication. Journal of the Philosophy of History 1 (1):79-100.score: 30.0
    I begin with a kind of phenomenological reporting of the recent war between Israel and the Hezbollah in Lebanon, in order to explain the meaning of the thesis that "historicity is predication" - meaning by that to clarify the sense in which predication is a kind of political act (for good and sufficient philosophical reasons) and how the "objective" description of an evolving war illuminates such a philosophical reading of history.
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  27. Joseph Margolis (1975). Moral Cognitivism. Ethics 85 (2):136-141.score: 30.0
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  28. Joseph Margolis (2007). Rethinking Peirce's Fallibilism. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 43 (2):229-249.score: 30.0
    : Peirce's fallibilism is shown to be the "linchpin" of his mature philosophy. In passing, objections regarding a seemingly serious paradox, a textual discrepancy, and the plausibility of an alternative approach to Peirce are answered. Peirce's fallibilism is indeed a puzzling thesis, particularly in that it appears to violate familiar finitist, practical, "here and now" (pragmatist) constraints. But that's precisely where Peirce's ingenuity takes its most interesting form. The solution provided shows the paradox and aporias of Peirce's account to be (...)
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  29. Eric Margolis (1999). What is Conceptual Glue? Minds and Machines 9 (2):241-255.score: 30.0
    Conceptual structures are commonly likened to scientific theories, yet the content and motivation of the theory analogy are rarely discussed. Gregory Murphy and Douglas Medin's The Role of Theories in Conceptual Coherence is a notable exception and has become an authoritative exposition of the utility of the theory analogy. For Murphy and Medin, the theory analogy solves what they call the problem of conceptual coherence or the problem of conceptual glue. I argue that they conflate a number of issues under (...)
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  30. Joseph Margolis (1989). The Novelty of Marx's Theory of Praxis. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 19 (4):367–388.score: 30.0
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  31. Joseph Margolis (1963). The Problem of Other Minds. Synthese 15 (December):401-411.score: 30.0
    I May, at a gathering, notice that Peter is sitting very stiffly in his chair. I say to myself, “Perhaps he has a pain. Yes, I think he has some sort of pain.” I have inferred a feeling of some sort from bodily behavior. It is not an impossible thing to do, to infer sometimes a feeling from bodily behavior. But it is a puzzling thing to do, at least in a philosophieal sense. Because we ordinarily hold that we cannot (...)
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  32. Stephen Laurence & Eric Margolis (2005). Number and Natural Language. In Peter Carruthers, Stephen Laurence & Stephen P. Stich (eds.), The Innate Mind: Structure and Content. New York: Oxford University Press New York. 1--216.score: 30.0
    One of the most important abilities we have as humans is the ability to think about number. In this chapter, we examine the question of whether there is an essential connection between language and number. We provide a careful examination of two prominent theories according to which concepts of the positive integers are dependent on language. The first of these claims that language creates the positive integers on the basis of an innate capacity to represent real numbers. The second claims (...)
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  33. Joseph Margolis (2007). Present Doldrums, Pleasant Prospects: Philosophy Early in the New Century. Philosophy and Social Criticism 33 (1):15-34.score: 30.0
    s effort to examine the prospects of inferentialism (inspired by Wilfrid Sellars’ work) is examined in terms of the uncertainties of contemporary philosophy and Brandom’s reading of selected prominent figures in the history of philosophy. The very idea of there being anything like a set of rules governing non-deductive inference (inferentialism) is problematic; so is Brandom’s reading of the figures he has selected in order to illuminate his own proposal along historical lines. We never quite learn how inferentialism bears on (...)
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  34. Joseph Margolis (1989). Reinterpreting Interpretation. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 47 (3):237-251.score: 30.0
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  35. Joseph Margolis (2008). Review of Edo Pivevi, The Reason Why: A Theory of Philosophical Explanation. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2008 (1).score: 30.0
    Edo Pivčević's The Reason Why is a thoroughly admirable book: absolutely straightforward and simple in argument, charmingly written, uncompromisingly legible but widely and tactfully informed, bent on asking and answering a single fundamental question usually cast as "metaphysical" or (after Kant) "epistemological", but, in Pivčević's hands, skillfully turned in what must be called a "pragmatist" direction. Careful readers may find (as I do) that the general lines of the argument are notably congruent with some of Charles Peirce's earliest accounts of (...)
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  36. Joseph Margolis (1966). Objectivism and Interactionism. Philosophy of Science 33 (June):118-123.score: 30.0
    The views of linguistic analysts and objectivists are explored with regard to the question of interactionism. It is argued that the admission of a logical difference between explanation by cause and explanation by motive cannot disqualify causal explanations of human action, cannot be construed as challenging the competence of science, and cannot count against interactionism. It is also argued that objectivist programs for eliminating mentalistic concepts either implicitly admit interactionism or cannot distinguish relevantly between interactionism and parallelism.
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  37. Joseph Margolis, Michael Krausz & Richard M. Burian (eds.) (1986). Rationality, Relativism, and the Human Sciences. M. Nijhoff.score: 30.0
  38. John R. Shook & Joseph Margolis (eds.) (2006). A Companion to Pragmatism. Blackwell Pub..score: 30.0
    A Companion to Pragmatism, comprised of 38 newly commissioned essays, provides comprehensive coverage of one of the most vibrant and exciting fields of philosophy today. Unique in depth and coverage of classical figures and their philosophies as well as pragmatism as a living force in philosophy. Chapters include discussions on philosophers such as John Dewey, Jürgen Habermas and Hilary Putnam.
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  39. Joseph Margolis (1976). Aesthetic Appreciation and the Imperceptible. British Journal of Aesthetics 16 (4):305-312.score: 30.0
    Three strategic claims are explored sympathetically: (i) aesthetic appreciation centers on what is directly discriminable but it cannot, Relative to art, Be restricted to what is thus discriminable; (ii) a work of art may be aesthetically appreciated for properties that it cannot actually be shown to have; (iii) forgeries may, "qua" forgeries, Exhibit aesthetically valuable properties, Including directly discriminable properties. These issues are pursued critically in the context of the views of goodman, Rudner, Iseminger, Dickie, Lyas, And danto--And of specimen (...)
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  40. Joseph Margolis (1976). G. E. Moore and Intuitionism. Ethics 87 (1):35-48.score: 30.0
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  41. Eric Margolis & Stephen Laurence (2002). Lewis' Strawman. Philosophical Quarterly 52 (206):55-65.score: 30.0
    In a survey of his views in the philosophy of mind, David Lewis criticizes much recent work in the field by attacking an imaginary opponent, Strawman. His case against Strawman focuses on four central theses which Lewis takes to be widely accepted among contemporary philosophers of mind. These theses concerns (1) the language of thought hypothesis and its relation to folk psychology, (2) narrow content, (3) de se content, and (4) rationality. We respond to Lewis, arguing (among other things) that (...)
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  42. Joseph Margolis (2004). Placing Artworks—Placing Ourselves. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 31 (1):1–16.score: 30.0
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  43. Joseph Margolis (1984). Relativism, History and Objectivity in the Human Studies. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 14 (1):1–23.score: 30.0
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  44. Joseph Margolis (1980). The Trouble with Homunculus Theories. Philosophy of Science 47 (June):244-259.score: 30.0
    The so-called post-Wittgensteinian Oxford philosophers are often criticized not only for failing to provide for the causal explanation of human behavior and psychological states, but also for failing to recognize that psychological explanations require appeal to sub-personal or molecular processes. Three strategies accommodating this criticism appear in so-called homunculus theories and include: (1) that the sub-systems be assigned intentional or informational content purely heuristically; (2) that the intentional or informational content of molar states be analyzed without remainder in terms of (...)
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  45. Jason M. Stansbury & Bart Victor (2009). Whistle-Blowing Among Young Employees: A Life-Course Perspective. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 85 (3):281 - 299.score: 30.0
    The 2003 National Business Ethics Survey, conducted by the Ethics Resource Center, found that respondents who were both young and had short organizational tenure were substantially less likely than other respondents to report misconduct that they observed in the workplace to an authority. We propose that the life-course model of deviance can help account for this attenuation of acquiescence in misbehavior. As employees learn to perceive informal prosocial control during their socialization into the workforce, we hypothesize that they will become (...)
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  46. Joseph Margolis & Evan Fales (1976). Donnellan on Definite Descriptions. Philosophia 6 (2):289-302.score: 30.0
    Donnellan's distinction between the referential and attributive uses of definite descriptions is shown not to cover exhaustive and exclusive alternatives but to fix the termini of a continuum of cases. in fact, donnellan's distinction rests on a mixed classification: the referential use, concerned with intended referents regardless of what speakers may say about them; the attributive use, concerned with definite descriptions used in using sentences, that something or other may satisfy. given this feature of his account, it is easy to (...)
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  47. Eric Margolis & Stephen Laurence (1998). Multiple Meanings and Stability of Content. Journal of Philosophy 95 (5):255-63.score: 30.0
    We examine a proposal of Eric Lormand's for dealing with perhaps the chief difficulty facing holistic theories of meaning—meaning instability. The problem is that, given a robust holism, small changes in a representational system are likely to lead to meaning changes throughout the system. Consequently, different individuals are likely never to mean the same thing. Lormand suggests that holists can avoid this problem—and even secure more stability than non-holists—by positing that symbols have multiple meanings. We argue that the proposal doesn't (...)
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  48. Joseph Margolis (1995). Plain Talk About Interpretation on a Relativistic Model. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 53 (1):1-7.score: 30.0
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  49. Stephen Laurence & Eric Margolis (1999). Where the Regress Argument Still Goes Wrong: Reply to Knowles. Analysis 59 (264):321-327.score: 30.0
    The Language of Thought Hypothesis (LOT) is at the centre of a number of the most fundamental debates about the mind. Yet many philosophers want to reject LOT out of hand on the grounds that it is essentially a recid- ivistic doctrine, one that has long since been refuted. According to these philosophers, LOT is subject to a devastating regress argument. There are several versions of the argument, but the basic idea is as follows. (1) Natu- ral language has some (...)
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  50. J. Margolis (2000). A Closer Look at Danto's Account of Art and Perception. British Journal of Aesthetics 40 (3):326-339.score: 30.0
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