Search results for 'Victor Margolis' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Víctor Farías, Joseph Margolis & Tom Rockmore (1989). Heidegger and Nazism. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  2. Victor Margolis (1995). The Plate Spinner: Playing with Time. Marik Pub..
     
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  3. Tom Rockmore & Joseph Margolis (1992). The Heidegger Case: On Philosophy and Politics. Journal of Nietzsche Studies 4:167-170.
     
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  4. Max Margolis, Richard Gottheil & A. Williams (1932). The Life and Work of Max Leopold Margolis. Journal of the American Oriental Society 52 (2):106-109.
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  5. W. V. Quine, Joseph Zalman Margolis, Ont Canada Council & London (1969). Fact and Existence Proceedings of the University of Western Ontario Philosophy Colloquium, November 1966. [By W.V. Quine and Others] Edited by Joseph Margolis. [REVIEW] University of Toronto Press.
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  6. Philippe Gavi, Jean Paul Sartre & Pierre Victor (1974). On a Raison de Se Révolter Discussions. Gallimard.
     
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  7.  44
    John B. Cullen, K. Praveen Parboteeah & Bart Victor (2003). The Effects of Ethical Climates on Organizational Commitment: A Two-Study Analysis. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 46 (2):127 - 141.
    Although organizational commitment continues to interest researchers because of its positive effects on organizations, we know relatively little about the effects of the ethical context on organizational commitment. As such, we contribute to the organizational commitment field by assessing the effects of ethical climates (Victor and Cullen, 1987, 1988) on organizational commitment. We hypothesized that an ethical climate of benevolence has a positive relationship with organizational commitment while egoistic climate is negatively related to commitment. Results supported our propositions for (...)
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  8. Joseph Margolis (1995). Historied Thought, Constructed World a Conceptual Primer for the Turn of the Millennium. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
    _Historied Thought, Constructed World_ offers a fresh vision: one that engages the reigning philosophies of the West, endorses the radical possibilities of historicity and flux, and reconciles the best themes of Anglo-American and continental European philosophy. Margolis sketches a program for the philosophy of the future, addressing topics such as the historical character of thinking, the intelligible world as artifact, the inseparability of theory and practice, and the reliability of a world without assured changeless structures. Through the use of (...)
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  9.  25
    Joseph Margolis (2003). The Unraveling of Scientism: American Philosophy at the End of the Twentieth Century. Cornell University Press.
    The Unraveling of Scientism, a companion to Joseph Margolis's Reinventing Pragmatism, follows the thread of American analytic philosophy through the second half ...
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  10.  11
    Joseph Margolis, A Second-Best Morality.
    This is the text of The Lindley Lecture for 1998, given by Joseph Margolis, an American philosopher.
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  11.  3
    Joseph Margolis (2004). Moral Philosophy After 9/11. Penn State University Press.
    Eschewing the resort to universal moral principles favored by traditional Anglo-American analytic philosophy, Joseph Margolis sets out to sketch an alternative approach that accepts the lack of any neutral ground or privileged normative ...
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  12. Joseph Margolis (2001). Selves and Other Texts: The Case for Cultural Realism. Penn State University Press.
    Extending his well-known investigations into the nature and logic of art and history in the cultural world, Joseph Margolis here offers a sustained account of how selves and the cultural phenomena they generate can be viewed as just as "real" as the physical nature from which they are emergent, while not being reducible to it. The book starts off with a review of prominent philosophies of art over the past half-century, focusing especially on Beardsley, Goodman, and Danto, so as (...)
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  13. Joseph Margolis (1998). The Flux of History and the Flux of Science. Human Studies 21 (1):71-77.
    Does thinking have a history? If there are no necessarily changeless structures to be found in things and in our inquiry into them, then what knowledge of the world and ourselves is possible? In this boldly original and elegantly written study, Joseph Margolis argues for a radically historicized view of history that treats it as both a real process and a narrative account, each a product of continual change. Developing his argument through discussions of such influential philosophers of history (...)
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  14.  1
    Joseph Margolis (1996). Interpretation Radical but Not Unruly: The New Puzzle of the Arts and History. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 54 (2):191-193.
    With this challenging work, Joseph Margolis continues the project begun in _The Flux of History and the Flux of Science_. Tackling one of philosophy's master themes, he develops the controversial thesis that the world is a flux. Here he applies this doctrine to Western theories of history and the interpretation of cultural phenomena—offering the first sustained analysis of the logic, methodology, and metaphysics of interpretation committed to a thoroughgoing relativism and the historicized structure of cultural phenomena. Versed in Anglo-American (...)
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  15. Joseph Margolis (2005). Moral Philosophy After 9/11. Penn State University Press.
    Were the perpetrators of the 9/11 attacks courageous "freedom fighters" or despicable terrorist murderers? These opposing characterizations reveal in extreme form the incompatibility between different moral visions that underlie many conflicts in the world today, conflicts that challenge us to consider how moral disputes may be resolved. Eschewing the resort to universal moral principles favored by traditional Anglo-American analytic philosophy, Joseph Margolis sets out to sketch an alternative approach that accepts the lack of any neutral ground or privileged normative (...)
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  16.  25
    Joseph Margolis (2009). On Aesthetics: An Unforgiving Introduction. Wadsworth.
    These books will prove valuable to philosophy teachers and their students as well as to other readers who share a general interest in philosophy. -/- What is art? Must art be beautiful? Must art be politically or culturally significant? How does art differ from other products of human activity? Joseph Margolis has spent decades thinking through these and related questions. In this book, he introduces his reader to the field of Aesthetics by thinking through the most fundamental philosophical questions (...)
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  17. Joseph Margolis (2012). Pragmatism Ascendent: A Yard of Narrative, a Touch of Prophecy. Stanford University Press.
    _Pragmatism Ascendent_ is the last of four volumes on the contribution of pragmatism to American philosophy and Western philosophy as a whole. It covers the period of American philosophy's greatest influence worldwide, from the second half of the 20th century through the beginning of the 21st. The book provides an account of the way pragmatism reinterprets the revolutionary contributions of Kant and Hegel, the significance of pragmatism's original vision, and the expansion of classic pragmatism to incorporate the strongest themes of (...)
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  18. Joseph Margolis (2003). Selves and Other Texts: The Case for Cultural Realism. Penn State University Press.
    Extending his well-known investigations into the nature and logic of art and history in the cultural world, Joseph Margolis here offers a sustained account of how selves and the cultural phenomena they generate can be viewed as just as "real" as the physical nature from which they are emergent, while not being reducible to it. The book starts off with a review of prominent philosophies of art over the past half-century, focusing especially on Beardsley, Goodman, and Danto, so as (...)
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  19. Joseph Margolis (2008). The Arts and the Definition of the Human: Toward a Philosophical Anthropology. Stanford University Press.
    _The Arts and the Definition of the Human_ introduces a novel theory that our selves—our thoughts, perceptions, creativity, and other qualities that make us human—are determined by our place in history, and more particularly by our culture and language. Margolis rejects the idea that any concepts or truths remain fixed and objective through the flow of history and reveals that this theory of the human being as culturally determined and changing is necessary to make sense of art. He shows (...)
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  20. Joseph Margolis (1999). What, After All, is a Work of Art?: Lectures in the Philosophy of Art. Penn State University Press.
    _What, After All, Is a Work of Art? _directs our attention toward historicity, the inherent historied nature of thinking, and the artifactual, culturally emergent nature of both art and human selves. While these are familiar themes in Margolis's well-known studies of art and culture, they are largely neglected in English-language aesthetics and even philosophy in general. Margolis brings these primary themes to bear on a number of strategically selected issues: the modernism/postmodernism dispute; the treatment of modernist and "post-historical" (...)
     
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  21. Eric Margolis & Stephen Laurence (eds.) (1999). Concepts: Core Readings. MIT Press.
    The first part of the book centers around the fall of the Classical Theory of Concepts in the face of attacks by W. V. O. Quine, Ludwig Wittgenstein, Eleanor..
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  22. Eric Margolis & Stephen Laurence (2007). The Ontology of Concepts: Abstract Objects or Mental Representations? Noûs 41 (4):561-593.
    What is a concept? Philosophers have given many different answers to this question, reflecting a wide variety of approaches to the study of mind and language. Nonetheless, at the most general level, there are two dominant frameworks in contemporary philosophy. One proposes that concepts are mental representations, while the other proposes that they are abstract objects. This paper looks at the differences between these two approaches, the prospects for combining them, and the issues that are involved in the dispute. We (...)
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  23. Stephen Laurence & Eric Margolis (2001). The Poverty of the Stimulus Argument. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 52 (2):217-276.
    Noam Chomsky's Poverty of the Stimulus Argument is one of the most famous and controversial arguments in the study of language and the mind. Though widely endorsed by linguists, the argument has met with much resistance in philosophy. Unfortunately, philosophical critics have often failed to fully appreciate the power of the argument. In this paper, we provide a systematic presentation of the Poverty of the Stimulus Argument, clarifying its structure, content, and evidential base. We defend the argument against a variety (...)
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  24. Stephen Laurence & Eric Margolis (2003). Concepts and Conceptual Analysis. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 67 (2):253-282.
    Conceptual analysis is undergoing a revival in philosophy, and much of the credit goes to Frank Jackson. Jackson argues that conceptual analysis is needed as an integral component of so-called serious metaphysics and that it also does explanatory work in accounting for such phenomena as categorization, meaning change, communication, and linguistic understanding. He even goes so far as to argue that opponents of concep- tual analysis are implicitly committed to it in practice. We show that he is wrong on all (...)
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  25.  77
    Stephen Laurence & Eric Margolis (2003). Radical Concept Nativism. Cognition 86 (1):25-55.
    Radical concept nativism is the thesis that virtually all lexical concepts are innate. Notoriously endorsed by Jerry Fodor (1975, 1981), radical concept nativism has had few supporters. However, it has proven difficult to say exactly what’s wrong with Fodor’s argument. We show that previous responses are inadequate on a number of grounds. Chief among these is that they typically do not achieve sufficient distance from Fodor’s dialectic, and, as a result, they do not illuminate the central question of how new (...)
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  26. Eric Margolis (1998). How to Acquire a Concept. Mind and Language 13 (3):347-369.
    In this paper, I develop a novel account of concept acquisition for an atomistic theory of concepts. Conceptual atomism is rarely explored in cognitive science because of the feeling that atomistic treatments of concepts are inherently nativistic. My model illustrates, on the contrary, that atomism does not preclude the learning of a concept.
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  27.  80
    Eric Margolis & Stephen Laurence (2003). Concepts. In Stephen P. Stich & Ted A. Warfield (eds.), Blackwell Guide to Philosophy of Mind. Blackwell 190-213.
    This article provides a critical overview of competing theories of conceptual structure (definitional structure, probabilistic structure, theory structure), including the view that concepts have no structure (atomism). We argue that the explanatory demands that these different theories answer to are best accommodated by an organization in which concepts are taken to have atomic cores that are linked to differing types of conceptual structure.
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  28.  17
    Howard Margolis (1981). A New Model of Rational Choice. Ethics 91 (2):265-279.
  29.  81
    Eric Margolis & Stephen Laurence (2003). Should We Trust Our Intuitions? Deflationary Accounts of the Analytic Data. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 103 (3):299-323.
    At least since W. V. O. Quine's famous critique of the analytic/synthetic distinction, philosophers have been deeply divided over whether there are any analytic truths. One line of thought suggests that the simple fact that people have ' intuitions of analyticity' might provide an independent argument for analyticities. If defenders of analyticity can explain these intuitions and opponents cannot, then perhaps there are analyticities after all. We argue that opponents of analyticity have some unexpected resources for explaining these intuitions and (...)
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  30. Eric Margolis & Stephen Laurence (2002). Lewis' Strawman. Philosophical Quarterly 52 (206):55-65.
    In a survey of his views in the philosophy of mind, David Lewis criticizes much recent work in the field by attacking an imaginary opponent, Strawman. His case against Strawman focuses on four central theses which Lewis takes to be widely accepted among contemporary philosophers of mind. These theses concerns (1) the language of thought hypothesis and its relation to folk psychology, (2) narrow content, (3) de se content, and (4) rationality. We respond to Lewis, arguing (among other things) that (...)
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  31.  6
    Joseph Margolis (1978). Persons and Minds: The Prospects of Non-Reductive Materialism. D.
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  32.  9
    Arie Y. Lewin, Tomoaki Sakano, Carroll U. Stephens & Bart Victor (1995). Corporate Citizenship in Japan: Survey Results From Japanese Firms. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 14 (2):83 - 101.
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  33. Joseph Margolis (1967). Ayer on Privacy. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 28 (2):259-263.
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  34. Joseph Margolis (1958). Kafka Vs. Eudaimonia and Duty. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 19 (1):27-42.
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  35. John W. Lenz, Paul Oskar Kristeller, Willis Doney, Norman Kretzmann, Colin Murray Turbayne, Arthur Pap, E. M. Adams, T. A. Goudge, Edward H. Madden, Rudolf Allers, Hans Jonas, Lawrence W. Beals, Philip Nochlin, Ethel M. Albert, Mary Mothersill, John W. Blyth, Hector N. Castañeda, Milton C. Nahm & Joseph Margolis (1957). The American Philosophical Association Eastern Division: Abstracts of Papers to Be Read at the Fifty-Fourth Annual Meeting, Harvard University, December 27-29, 1957. [REVIEW] Journal of Philosophy 54 (24):773-794.
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  36. Joseph Margolis (1976). G. E. Moore and Intuitionism. Ethics 87 (1):35-48.
  37. J. Margolis (2000). A Closer Look at Danto's Account of Art and Perception. British Journal of Aesthetics 40 (3):326-339.
  38. Stephen Laurence & Eric Margolis (1997). Regress Arguments Against the Language of Thought. Analysis 57 (1):60-66.
    The Language of Thought Hypothesis is often taken to have the fatal flaw that it generates an explanatory regress. The language of thought is invoked to explain certain features of natural language (e.g., that it is learned, understood, and is meaningful), but, according to the regress argument, the language of thought itself has these same features and hence no explanatory progress has been made. We argue that such arguments rely on the tacit assumption that the entire motivation for the language (...)
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  39.  58
    Joseph Margolis (2007). Rethinking Peirce's Fallibilism. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 43 (2):229-249.
    : Peirce's fallibilism is shown to be the "linchpin" of his mature philosophy. In passing, objections regarding a seemingly serious paradox, a textual discrepancy, and the plausibility of an alternative approach to Peirce are answered. Peirce's fallibilism is indeed a puzzling thesis, particularly in that it appears to violate familiar finitist, practical, "here and now" (pragmatist) constraints. But that's precisely where Peirce's ingenuity takes its most interesting form. The solution provided shows the paradox and aporias of Peirce's account to be (...)
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  40.  59
    Stephen Laurence & Eric Margolis (2005). Number and Natural Language. In Peter Carruthers, Stephen Laurence & Stephen P. Stich (eds.), The Innate Mind: Structure and Content. New York: Oxford University Press New York 1--216.
    One of the most important abilities we have as humans is the ability to think about number. In this chapter, we examine the question of whether there is an essential connection between language and number. We provide a careful examination of two prominent theories according to which concepts of the positive integers are dependent on language. The first of these claims that language creates the positive integers on the basis of an innate capacity to represent real numbers. The second claims (...)
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  41.  21
    Eric Margolis (1995). The Significance of the Theory Analogy in the Psychological Study of Concepts. Mind and Language 10 (1-2):45-71.
    Many psychologists think that concepts should be understood on analogy with the terms of scientific theories, yet the significance of this claim has always been obscure. In this paper, I clarify the psychological content of the theory analogy, focusing on influential pieces by Susan Carey. Once plainly put, the analogy amounts to the view that a mental representation has its semantic properties by virtue of its role in a restricted knowledge structure. One of the commendable things about Carey's work is (...)
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  42. Stephen Laurence & Eric Margolis (1999). Where the Regress Argument Still Goes Wrong: Reply to Knowles. Analysis 59 (264):321-327.
    The Language of Thought Hypothesis (LOT) is at the centre of a number of the most fundamental debates about the mind. Yet many philosophers want to reject LOT out of hand on the grounds that it is essentially a recid- ivistic doctrine, one that has long since been refuted. According to these philosophers, LOT is subject to a devastating regress argument. There are several versions of the argument, but the basic idea is as follows. (1) Natu- ral language has some (...)
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  43.  81
    Joseph Margolis (1998). Farewell to Danto and Goodman. British Journal of Aesthetics 38 (4):353-374.
  44.  76
    Joseph Margolis (1988). Minds, Selves, and Persons. Topoi 7 (March):31-45.
    There is a considerable effort in current theorizing about psychological phenomena to eliminate minds and selves as a vestige of folk theories. The pertinent strategies are quite varied and may focus on experience, cognition, interests, responsibility, behavior and the scientific explanation of these phenomena or what they purport to identify. The minimal function of the notion of self is to assign experience to a suitable entity and to fix such ascription in a possessive as well as a predicative way. It (...)
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  45. Joseph Margolis (1984). Philosophy Of Psychology. Englewood: Cliffs Prentice-Hall.
  46.  74
    Joseph Margolis (1966). Awareness of Sensations and of the Location of Sensations. Analysis 26 (October):29-32.
  47.  71
    Eric Margolis (1999). What is Conceptual Glue? Minds and Machines 9 (2):241-255.
    Conceptual structures are commonly likened to scientific theories, yet the content and motivation of the theory analogy are rarely discussed. Gregory Murphy and Douglas Medin's The Role of Theories in Conceptual Coherence is a notable exception and has become an authoritative exposition of the utility of the theory analogy. For Murphy and Medin, the theory analogy solves what they call the problem of conceptual coherence or the problem of conceptual glue. I argue that they conflate a number of issues under (...)
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  48.  54
    Joseph Margolis (1970). Numerical Identity and Reference in the Arts. British Journal of Aesthetics 10 (2):138-146.
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  49.  17
    Joseph Margolis (1969). Existential Import and Perceptual Judgments. Journal of Philosophy 66 (13):403-408.
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  50.  31
    Joseph Margolis (1975). Puccetti on Brains, Minds, and Persons. Philosophy of Science 42 (September):275-280.
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