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  1. Victoria Davion (2014). Climate Change, Ethics, and Human Security. Edited by Karen O'Brien, Asunción Lera ST. Clair and Berit Kristoffersen. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 2010. [REVIEW] Hypatia 29 (3):707-712.
  2. Victoria Davion (2009). Feminist Perspectives on Global Warming, Genocide, and Card's Theory of Evil. Hypatia 24 (1):160 - 177.
    This essay explores several moral issues raised by global warming through the lens of Claudia Card's theory of evil. I focus on Alaskan villages in the sub-Arctic whose residents must relocate owing to extreme erosion, melting sea ice, and rising water levels. I use Card's discussion of genocide as social death to argue that failure to help these groups maintain their unique cultural identities can be thought of as genocidal.
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  3. Victoria Davion (2009). Introduction: In Honor of Val Plumwood, 1939–2008. Ethics and the Environment 14 (2):pp. 1-2.
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  4. Victoria Davion (2008). Itch Scratching, Patio Building, and Pesky Flies. Environmental Ethics 28 (2):115-128.
    Biocentric individualism, the position that all life has intrinsic value, is of no practical help in policy-making contexts. Examples commonly used in discussions of biocentric individualism are themselves alienating and threaten to make environmental philosophy appear irrelevant to policy decisions. Hence, both biocentric individualism and typical discussions of it are problematic for those wishing to make environmental philosophy useful in policy. A recent article by Jason Kawall, in which he attempts to defend biocentric individualism, demonstrates these points.
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  5. Lynne S. Arnault, Bat-Ami Bar On, Alyssa R. Bernstein, Victoria Davion, Marilyn Fischer, Virginia Held, Peter Higgins, Sabrina Hom, Audra King, James L. Nelson, Serena Parekh, April Shaw & Joan Tronto (2007). Global Feminist Ethics. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
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  6. Victoria Davion (2007). Future of Environmental Philosophy. Ethics and the Environment 12 (2):149-150.
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  7. Robert Frodeman, Dale Jamieson, J. Baird Callicott, Stephen M. Gardiner, Lori Gruen, Irene J. Klaver, Eugene Hargrove, Ben A. Minteer, Bryan Norton, Clare Palmer, Holmes Rolston, Ricardo Rozzi, James P. Sterba, William M. Throop & Victoria Davion (2007). Commentary on the Future of Environmental Philosophy. Ethics and the Environment 12 (2):117 - 150.
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  8. Victoria Davion (2006). Coming Down to Earth on Cloning: An Ecofeminist Analysis of Homophobia in the Current Debate. Hypatia 21 (4):58-76.
    : In this essay, Davion argues that many arguments appealing to an "intuition" that reproductive cloning is morally wrong because it is "unnatural" rely upon an underlying moral assumption that only heterosexuality is "natural," an assumption that grounds extreme homophobia in America. Therefore, critics of cloning who are in favor of gay and lesbian equality have reasons to avoid prescriptive appeals to the so-called "natural" in making their arguments. Davion then suggests anticloning arguments that do not make such appeals.
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  9. Victoria Davion (2006). Health Care in the United States: Evil Intentions and Collective Responsibility. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 30 (1):325–337.
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  10. Victoria Davion (2006). Itch Scratching, Patio Building, and Pesky Flies: Biocentric Individualism Revisted. Environmental Ethics 28 (2):115-128.
    Biocentric individualism, the position that all life has intrinsic value, is of no practical help in policy-making contexts. Examples commonly used in discussions of biocentric individualism are themselves alienating and threaten to make environmental philosophy appear irrelevant to policy decisions. Hence, both biocentric individualism and typical discussions of it are problematic for those wishing to make environmental philosophy useful in policy. A recent article by Jason Kawall, in which he attempts to defend biocentric individualism, demonstrates these points.
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  11. Val Plumwood, Ronnie Hawkins & Victoria Davion (2003). Call For Papers (Extended). Ethics and the Environment 8:2.
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  12. Victoria Davion (2002). Anthropocentrism, Artificial Intelligence, and Moral Network Theory: An Ecofeminist Perspective. Environmental Values 11 (2):163 - 176.
    This paper critiques a conception of intelligence central in AI, and a related concept of reason central in moral philosophy, from an ecological feminist perspective. I argue that ecofeminist critique of human/nature dualisms offers insight into the durability of both problematic conceptions, and into the direction of research programmes. I conclude by arguing for the importance of keeping political analysis in the forefront of science and environmental ethics.
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  13. Steven C. Rockefeller, Ana Isla, Terisa E. Turner, Paul T. Durbin, Eunice Blavascumas, Sonia Ftacnikova, Luis Alberto Camargo, Vicky Castillo, Garrick E. Louiis, Luna M. Magpili, Janos I. Toth, William E. Rees, Don Brown, Patricia H. Werhane, Mary A. Hamilton, Imre Lazar, Emese Kiss, Lech Ryszkowski, Robert Goodland, Clive A. Edwards, David Pimentel, James R. Karr, Mark Anielski, Colin L. Soskolne, Rubye Howard Braye, Ruth Miller Lucier, Naomi Zack, Julia Bartkowiak, Victoria Davion, J. Ronald Engle, Abelardo Brenes, Fayen D'Evie & Steven M. Glass (2002). Just Ecological Integrity: The Ethics of Maintaining Planetary Life. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
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  14. Robert Baird, Reagan Ramsower, Stuart E. Rosenbaum, Victoria Davion, Clark Wolf, John Martin Fischer, S. J. Mark Ravizza, Margaret Gilbert, Christopher W. Gowans & Jorge J. Gracia (2000). Almeder, Robert, Human Happiness and Morality: A Brief Introduction to Ethics (Amherst: Prometheus Books, 2000), 211 Pages. Audi, Robert, Epistemology: A Contemporary Introduction to the Theory of Knowledge (London: Routledge, 1998), 340 Pages. [REVIEW] Journal of Ethics 4:419-422.
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  15. Victoria Davion (1999). Editor's Note. Ethics and the Environment 4 (1):1-1.
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  16. Victoria Davion (1997). Rape Research and Gender Feminism: So Who's Anti-Male? Public Affairs Quarterly 11 (3):229-243.
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  17. Beth Preston & Victoria Davion (1997). Mind and Morals: Essays on Cognitive Science and Ethics. [REVIEW] Minds and Machines 7 (3):447-451.
  18. Victoria Davion (1996). So What's the Difference? Feminist Ethics and Feminist Jurisprudence. Journal of Social Philosophy 27 (3):101-115.
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  19. Victoria Davion (1995). Rape, Group Responsibility and Trust. Hypatia 10 (2):153 - 156.
    In this paper I link the very interesting analysis of responsibility provided by Larry May and Robert Strikwerda in "Men in Groups: Collective Responsibility for Rape (May and Strikwerda 1994) to some strategies for helping women avoid rape. In addition, I call for some clarification on May and Strikwerda's claim that rapists are fully responsible for their actions and that it is largely a matter of luck which men actually turn out to be rapists.
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  20. Victoria Davion (1995). Souci et connexion dans l'éthique de la politique générale. Philosophiques 22 (1):53-63.
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  21. Victoria Davion (1993). Autonomy, Integrity, and Care. Social Theory and Practice 19 (2):161-182.
  22. Victoria Davion (1993). The Ethics of Self-Corruption. Journal of Social Philosophy 24 (3):233-242.
  23. Victoria Davion (1992). Action-Guides and Wrongful Intentions. Public Affairs Quarterly 6 (4):365-374.
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  24. Victoria Davion (1992). Caring and Violence. Hypatia 7 (1):135 - 137.
    I reply to Laura Duhan Kaplan that I do not suggest women's political choices concerning pacifism are determined by biology. Although I contend the practice of mothering does not imply a pacifist commitment, this does not imply that the practice of mothering is inconsistent with such a commitment. Further, because the practice of mothering is not limited to women, even if it is inconsistent with pacifist commitment, this does not limit choices based on biology.
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  25. Victoria Davion (1990). Pacifism and Care. Hypatia 5 (1):90 - 100.
    I argue there is no pacifist commitment implied by the practice of mothering, contrary to what Ruddick suggests. Using violence in certain situations is consistent with the goals of this practice. Furthermore, I use Ruddick's valuable analysis of the care for particular individuals involved in this practice to show why pacifism may be incompatible with caring passionately for individuals. If giving up passionate attachments to individuals is necessary for pacifist commitment as Ghandi claims, then the price is too high.
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  26. Victoria Davion (1988). Competition, Recognition, and Approval-Seeking. Hypatia 3 (2):165 - 166.
    Here I support my position in "Do Good Feminists Compete?" against the suggestion that competing with others weakens rather than strengthens one's sense of self.
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  27. Victoria Davion (1987). Do Good Feminists Compete? Hypatia 2 (2):55 - 63.
    In this paper I argue against the view widely held among feminists that nurturing and competition are incompatible. I also explore the following two more specific objections against competition: (1) competitions are "mini-wars" which encourage hatred; (2) while not "mini-wars," competitions foster a war-like mentality. Underlying these objections is the fear that too strong a sense of self makes war likely by severing connection with others. I argue that because patriarchy encourages women to have too little sense of self, some (...)
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