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Profile: Victoria Harrison (Glasgow University)
  1. Victoria S. Harrison, Theorizing Religious Diversity in a Multicultural World.
    This paper examines a variety of intellectual responses to the religious and philosophical issues raised by religious plurality. While the specific questions raised by religious plurality differ across traditions, the more general problem that faces all religious intellectuals is how to provide a compelling theoretical account of the relationship between the various religions of the world. The paper briefly reviews religious exclusivism and inclusivism, before focusing upon theories of religious pluralism. After clarifying the distinction between religious pluralism and relativism about (...)
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  2. Victoria S. Harrison (2012). Eastern Philosophy: The Basics. Routledge.
    Eastern Philosophy: The Basics is an essential introduction to major Indian and Chinese philosophies, both past and present. Exploring familiar metaphysical and ethical questions from the perspectives of different Eastern philosophies, including Confucianism, Daoism, and strands of Buddhism and Hinduism, this book covers key figures, issues, methods and concepts. Questions discussed include: What is the ‘self’? Is human nature inherently good or bad? How is the mind related to the world? How can you live an authentic life? What is the (...)
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  3. Victoria S. Harrison (2012). The End of Philosophy of Religion. Faith and Philosophy 29 (1):99-103.
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  4. Victoria S. Harrison (2010). Andrew Moore and Michael Scott (Eds) Realism and Religion: Philosophical and Theological Perspectives . (Aldershot: Ashgate, 2007). Pp. 163. £55.00 (Hbk), £16.99 (Pbk). Isbn 9780754652328. [REVIEW] Religious Studies 46 (1):125-130.
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  5. Victoria S. Harrison (2010). Postmodern Thought and Religion: Open-Traditionalism and Radical Orthodoxy on Religious Belief and Experience. Heythrop Journal 51 (6):962-974.
    This paper considers some of the ways in which ‘postmodernism’ is construed, before turning to several important representative examples of religious postmodern thought. It highlights some common features possessed by prominent examples of religious postmodern thought within Judaism and Christianity. Much postmodern religious thought is characterised by the separation of religious belief from religious experience, and is marked by the tendency to emphasise the latter at the expense of the former. This paper argues that, despite this tendency, the work of (...)
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  6. Victoria S. Harrison (2008). Internal Realism, Religious Pluralism and Ontology. Philosophia 36 (1):97-110.
    Internalist pluralism is an attractive and elegant theory. However, there are two apparently powerful objections to this approach that prevent its widespread adoption. According to the first objection, the resulting analysis of religious belief systems is intrinsically atheistic; while according to the second objection, the analysis is unsatisfactory because it allows religious objects simply to be defined into existence. In this article, I demonstrate that an adherent of internalist pluralism can deflect both of these objections, and in the course of (...)
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  7. Victoria S. Harrison (2007). Feminist Philosophy of Religion and the Problem of Epistemic Privilege. Heythrop Journal 48 (5):685–696.
  8. Victoria S. Harrison (2007). Metaphor, Religious Language, and Religious Experience. Sophia 46 (2):127-145.
    Is it possible to talk about God without either misrepresentation or failing to assert anything of significance? The article begins by reviewing how, in attempting to answer this question, traditional theories of religious language have failed to sidestep both potential pitfalls adequately. After arguing that recently developed theories of metaphor seem better able to shed light on the nature of religious language, it considers the claim that huge areas of our language and, consequently, of our experience are shaped by metaphors. (...)
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  9. Victoria S. Harrison (2006). Internal Realism and the Problem of Religious Diversity. Philosophia 34 (3):287-301.
    This article applies Hilary Putnam’s theory of internal realism to the issue of religious plurality. The result of this application – ‘internalist pluralism’ – constitutes a paradigm shift within the Philosophy of Religion. Moreover, internalist pluralism succeeds in avoiding the major difficulties faced by John Hick’s famous theory of religious pluralism, which views God, or ‘the Real,’ as the noumenon lying behind diverse religious phenomena. In side-stepping the difficulties besetting Hick’s revolutionary Kantian approach, without succumbing to William Alston’s critique of (...)
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  10. Victoria S. Harrison (2006). Scientific and Religious Worldviews: Antagonism, Non‐Antagonistic Incommensurability and Complementarity. Heythrop Journal 47 (3):349-366.
  11. Victoria S. Harrison (2005). The Metamorphosis of “the End of the World”: From Theology to Philosophy and Back Again. Philosophy and Theology 17 (1/2):33-50.
    This paper highlights certain features of the metamorphosis that the concept “the end of the world” has undergone from its origin in early Christian thought to the present day. This concept has, in recent decades, become increasingly prominent within Western European Lutheran and Roman Catholic theology. This paperdemonstrates that the notion of the end of the world popularized by Jürgen Moltmann and Karl Rahner, despite the traditional, biblical language in which it is couched, has more affinity with the philosophical concept (...)
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  12. Victoria S. Harrison (2000). Holiness, Theology and Philosophy. Philosophy and Theology 12 (1):53-78.
    Hans Urs von Balthasar calls for a revival of what he sees as the original relationship between human holiness and Christian theology. He suggests that modern theologians should imitate their patristic forebears to the extent that they combine holy living with an objective stance corresponding to the intellectual rigor proper to theology. The article summarizes von Balthasar’s analysis of the development and current state of what he portrays as the problem of separation between theology and human holiness, considers the role (...)
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  13. Victoria S. Harrison (1999). Human Holiness as Religious Shape Apologia. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 46 (2):63-82.
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  14. Victoria S. Harrison (1999). Homo Orans: Von Balthasar's Christocentric Philosophical Anthropology. Heythrop Journal 40 (3):280–300.
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  15. Victoria S. Harrison (1999). Personal Identity and Integration: Von Balthasar's Phenomenology of Human Holiness. Heythrop Journal 40 (4):424–437.
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  16. Victoria S. Harrison (1998). Putnam's Internal Realism and Von Balthasar's Religious Epistemology. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 44 (2):67 - 92.
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  17. Victoria S. Harrison (1997). Kierkegaard's Philosophical Fragments: A Clarification. Religious Studies 33 (4):455-472.
    The article proposes that the hypothetical framework of Kierkegaard's "Philosophical Fragments" is determined by the question 'How is it possible for one to become a disciple?' An account of this framework is provided by employing an original interpretation of the concept 'the Moment'. This enables an understanding of 'the condition' by means of a contrast between 'Universalist' and 'Particularist' perspectives. Moreover, it is only when the insights offered by both perspectives are combined that the answer to the determining question of (...)
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