Search results for 'Video games Philosophy' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Aaron Smuts (2005). Video Games and the Philosophy of Art. American Society for Aesthetics Newsletter.score: 522.0
    The most cursory look at video games raises several interesting issues that have yet to receive any consideration in the philosophy of art, such as: Are videogames art and, if so, what kind of art are they? Are they more closely related to film, or are they similar to performance arts, such as dance? Perhaps they are more akin to competitive sports and games like diving and chess? Can we even define “video game” or “game”? (...)
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  2. Jon Cogburn (2009). Philosophy Through Video Games. Routledge.score: 483.0
    I, player : the puzzle of personal identity (MMORPGS and Virtual Communities) -- The game inside the mind, the mind inside the game (The Nintendo Wii Gaming Console) -- Realistic blood and gore : do violent games make violent gamers? (First-person Shooters) -- Games and God's goodness (World-builder and Tycoon Games) -- The metaphysics of interactive art (Puzzle and Adventure Games) -- Artificial and human intelligence (Single-player RPGS) -- Epilogue: Video games and the meaning (...)
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  3. Marcus Schulzke (2014). Simulating Philosophy: Interpreting Video Games as Executable Thought Experiments. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Technology 27 (2):251-265.score: 441.0
    This essay proposes an alternative way of studying video games: as thought experiments akin to the narrative thought experiments that are frequently used in philosophy. This perspective incorporates insights from the narratological and ludological perspectives in game studies and highlights the philosophical significance of games. Video game thought experiments are similar to narrative thought experiments in many respects and can perform the same functions. They also have distinctive advantages over narrative thought experiments, as they situate (...)
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  4. Aaron Smuts (2003). Film Theory Meets Video Games: An Analysis of the Issues and Methodologies in 'ScreenPlay'. [REVIEW] Film-Philosophy 7 (54).score: 396.0
    "ScreenPlay" is the first collection of essays devoted to exploring the relationship between cinema and video games. It attempts to introduce the field of video game studies while also increasing our understanding of the two artforms. Although not all of the essays are models of clear thinking on the subject, the volume will be a valuable resource for those working in film, philosophy, new media, and video game studies. Geoff King and Tanya Krzywinska have brought (...)
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  5. Patrick John Coppock, Graeme Kirkpatrick, Olli Tapio Leino & Anita Leirfall (2014). Introduction to the Special Issue on the Philosophy of Computer Games. Philosophy and Technology 27 (2):151-157.score: 378.0
    The seven articles that constitute this special issue illustrate scholarly interactions between philosophy and game studies. The wide range of game types/genres and the multiple philosophical issues concerning them are rich and productive. They indicate well the significant contribution that philosophical approaches can make to further development of scholarly understandings of computer games and gaming. Each article breaks new conceptual ground in ways likely to resonate within the new discipline of computer game studies but also, beyond this, in (...)
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  6. Aaron Smuts (2005). Are Video Games Art? Contemporary Aesthetics 2.score: 342.0
    I argue that by any major definition of art many modern video games should be considered art. Rather than defining art and defending video games based on a single contentious definition, I offer reasons for thinking that video games can be art according to historical, aesthetic, institutional, representational and expressive theories of art. Overall, I argue that while many video games probably should not be considered art, there are good reasons to think (...)
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  7. Stefano Gualeni (2014). Augmented Ontologies or How to Philosophize with a Digital Hammer. Philosophy and Technology 27 (2):177-199.score: 270.0
    Could a person ever transcend what it is like to be in the world as a human being? Could we ever know what it is like to be other creatures? Questions about the overcoming of a human perspective are not uncommon in the history of philosophy. In the last century, those very interrogatives were notably raised by American philosopher Thomas Nagel in the context of philosophy of mind. In his 1974 essay What is it Like to Be a (...)
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  8. Tad Bratkowski (2010). Philosophy Through Video Games. Teaching Philosophy 33 (3):317-320.score: 270.0
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  9. Michiel Kamp (2014). Musical Ecologies in Video Games. Philosophy and Technology 27 (2):235-249.score: 261.0
    What makes video games unique as an audiovisual medium is not just that they are interactive, but that this interactivity is rule bound and goal oriented. This means that player experience, including experience of the music, is somehow shaped or structured by these characteristics. Because of its emphasis on action in perception, James Gibson’s ecological approach to psychology—particularly his concept of affordances—is well suited to theorise the role of music in player experience. In a game, players perceive the (...)
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  10. Luke Cuddy (ed.) (2009). The Legend of Zelda and Philosophy: I Link Thereforei Am. Open Court.score: 227.0
    "Chapters address philosophical aspects of the video game The Legend of Zelda and video game culture in general"--Provided by publisher.
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  11. Miguel Sicart (2009). The Ethics of Computer Games. Mit Press.score: 216.0
    Why computer games can be ethical, how players use their ethical values in gameplay, and the implications for game design.
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  12. Andreas Gregersen (2014). Generic Structures, Generic Experiences: A Cognitive Experientialist Approach to Video Game Analysis. Philosophy and Technology 27 (2):159-175.score: 195.0
    The article discusses the issue of how to categorize video games—not the medium of video games, but individual video games. As a lead in to this discussion, the article discusses video game specificity and genericity and moves on to genre theory. On the basis of this discussion, a cognitive experientialist genre framework is sketched, which incorporates both general points from genre theory and theories more specific to the video game domain. The framework (...)
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  13. Grant Tavinor (2009). The Art of Videogames. Wiley-Blackwell.score: 189.0
    The new art of videogames -- What are videogames anyway? -- On definition -- Theories of gaming -- A definition of videogames -- Videogames and fiction -- From tennis for two to worlds of warcraft -- Imaginary worlds and works of fiction -- Fictional or virtual? -- Interactive fiction -- Stepping into fictional worlds -- Welcome to rapture -- Meet niko bellic -- Experiencing game worlds -- Acting in game worlds -- Games through fiction -- The nature of gaming (...)
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  14. David I. Waddington (2007). Locating the Wrongness in Ultra-Violent Video Games. Ethics and Information Technology 9 (2):121-128.score: 168.0
    The extremely high level of simulated violence in certain recent video games has made some people uneasy. There is a concern that something is wrong with these violent games, but, since the violence is virtual rather than real, it is difficult to specify the nature of the wrongness. Since there is no proven causal connection between video-game violence and real violence, philosophical analysis can be particularly helpful in locating potential sources of wrongness in ultra-violent video (...)
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  15. Jon Cogburn & Mark Silcox (2005). Computing Machinery and Emergence: The Aesthetics and Metaphysics of Video Games. Minds and Machines 15 (1):73-89.score: 168.0
    We build on some of Daniel Dennett’s ideas about predictive indispensability to characterize properties of video games discernable by people as computationally emergent if, and only if: (1) they can be instantiated by a computing machine, and (2) there is no algorithm for detecting instantiations of them. We then use this conception of emergence to provide support to the aesthetic ideas of Stanley Fish and to illuminate some aspects of the Chomskyan program in cognitive science.
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  16. Gitte Jantzen & Jans F. Jensen (1993). Powerplay — Power, Violence and Gender in Video Games. AI and Society 7 (4):368-385.score: 168.0
    Unlike the bulk of electronic media the computer game or video game is a distinctly gendered medium. All investigations confirm that we are dealing with a medium which almost exclusively appeals to and is used by, boys and young men. Therefore, the video games and computer games are very suited for investigating the form of entertainment, the pleasure, that appeals to men, i.e. the specific ‘masculine pleasure’.The paper deals with questions such as: What do computer (...) mean? What does violence in computer games signify? Why do computer games, especially the violent ones, mean something special to a certain group of men? These questions are discussed from the perspective of semiotics, media and control studies.Finally, the paper discusses the connections between women and the male dominated video games, and attempts to explain why, nevertheless, some girls and women do play these games. (shrink)
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  17. Carl Senior Nick Tannahill, Patrick Tissington (2012). Video Games and Higher Education: What Can “Call of Duty” Teach Our Students? Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 168.0
    Video Games and Higher Education: What Can “Call of Duty” Teach Our Students?
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  18. Walter R. Boot, Michael Champion, Daniel Patrick Blakely, Timothy Wright, Dustin Souders & Neil Charness (2013). Video Games as a Means to Reduce Age-Related Cognitive Decline: Attitudes, Compliance, and Effectiveness. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 168.0
    Recent research has demonstrated broad benefits of video game play to perceptual and cognitive abilities. These broad improvements suggest that video game-based cognitive interventions may be ideal to combat the many perceptual and cognitive declines associated with advancing age. Furthermore, game interventions have the potential to induce higher rates of intervention compliance compared to other cognitive interventions as they are assumed to be inherently enjoyable and motivating. We explored these issues in an intervention that tested the ability of (...)
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  19. Joseph Hilgard, Christopher R. Engelhardt & Bruce D. Bartholow (2013). Individual Differences in Motives, Preferences, and Pathology in Video Games: The Gaming Attitudes, Motives, and Experiences Scales (GAMES). Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 165.3
    A new measure of individual habits and preferences in video game use is developed in order to better study the risk factors of pathological game use (i.e., excessively frequent or prolonged use, sometimes called “game addiction”). This measure was distributed to internet message boards for game enthusiasts and to college undergraduates. An exploratory factor analysis identified 9 factors: Story, Violent Catharsis, Violent Reward, Social Interaction, Escapism, Loss-Sensitivity, Customization, Grinding, and Autonomy. These factors demonstrated excellent fit in a subsequent confirmatory (...)
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  20. Daniel J. Simons Walter R. Boot, Daniel P. Blakely (2011). Do Action Video Games Improve Perception and Cognition? Frontiers in Psychology 2.score: 153.3
    Frequent action video game players often outperform non-gamers on measures of perception and cognition, and some studies find that video game practice enhances those abilities. The possibility that video game training transfers broadly to other aspects of cognition is exciting because training on one task rarely improves performance on others. At first glance, the cumulative evidence suggests a strong relationship between gaming experience and other cognitive abilities, but methodological shortcomings call that conclusion into question. We discuss these (...)
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  21. Stephanie L. Patridge (2013). Pornography, Ethics, and Video Games. Ethics and Information Technology 15 (1):25-34.score: 142.0
    In a recent and provocative essay, Christopher Bartel attempts to resolve the gamer’s dilemma. The dilemma, formulated by Morgan Luck, goes as follows: there is no principled distinction between virtual murder and virtual pedophilia. So, we’ll have to give up either our intuition that virtual murder is morally permissible—seemingly leaving us over-moralizing our gameplay—or our intuition that acts of virtual pedophilia are morally troubling—seemingly leaving us under-moralizing our game play. Bartel’s attempted resolution relies on establishing the following three theses: (1) (...)
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  22. Shannon Kincaid (2005). Philosophy: The Video Game. Philosophy Now 52:44-44.score: 142.0
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  23. Monique Wonderly (2008). A Humean Approach to Assessing the Moral Significance of Ultra-Violent Video Games. Ethics and Information Technology 10 (1):1-10.score: 140.0
  24. Pauline L. Baniqued, Michael B. Kranz, Michelle W. Voss, Hyunkyu Lee, Joshua D. Cosman, Joan Severson & Arthur F. Kramer (2014). Cognitive Training with Casual Video Games: Points to Consider. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 140.0
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  25. Marcus Schulzke (2010). Defending the Morality of Violent Video Games. Ethics and Information Technology 12 (2):127-138.score: 138.7
    The effect of violent video games is among the most widely discussed topics in media studies, and for good reason. These games are immensely popular, but many seem morally objectionable. Critics attack them for a number of reasons ranging from their capacity to teach players weapons skills to their ability to directly cause violent actions. This essay shows that many of these criticisms are misguided. Theoretical and empirical arguments against violent video games often suffer from (...)
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  26. David I. Waddington (2010). The Civic Potential of Video Games by Joseph Kahne, Ellen Middaugh and Chris Evans. Journal of Philosophy of Education 44 (4):599-602.score: 135.0
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  27. Nikki Kent (forthcoming). Claim: Video Gaming Companies Should Not Create Violent Video Games Due to the Fact That They Can Provoke Unethical Behaviors in Children. Philosophy.score: 135.0
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  28. Stephanie Patridge (2011). The Incorrigible Social Meaning of Video Game Imagery. Ethics and Information Technology 13 (4):303-312.score: 124.0
    In this paper, I consider a particular amoralist challenge against those who would morally criticize our single-player video play, viz., “come on, it’s only a game!” The amoralist challenge with which I engage gains strength from two facts: the activities to which the amoralist lays claim are only those that do not involve interactions with other rational or sentient creatures, and the amoralist concedes that there may be extrinsic, consequentialist considerations that support legitimate moral criticisms. I argue that the (...)
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  29. Lynette J. Tippett Andrew J. Latham, Lucy L. M. Patston (2013). The Virtual Brain: 30 Years of Video-Game Play and Cognitive Abilities. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 124.0
    Forty years have passed since video-games were first made widely available to the public and subsequently playing games has become a favourite past-time for many. Players continuously engage with dynamic visual displays with success contingent on the time-pressured deployment, and flexible allocation, of attention as well as precise bimanual movements. Evidence to date suggests that both brief and extensive exposure to video-game play can result in a broad range of enhancements to various cognitive faculties that generalize (...)
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  30. Richard Burnor (2011). Ethical Choices: An Introduction to Moral Philosophy with Cases. Oxford University Press.score: 114.0
    Ideal for students with little or no background in philosophy, Ethical Choices: An Introduction to Moral Philosophy with Cases provides a concise, balanced, and highly accessible introduction to ethics. Featuring an especially lucid and engaging writing style, the text surveys a wide range of ethical theories and perspectives including consequentialist ethics, deontological ethics, natural and virtue ethics, the ethics of care, and ethics and religion. Each chapter of Ethical Choices also includes compelling case studies that are carefully matched (...)
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  31. Matt McCormick (2001). Is It Wrong to Play Violent Video Games? Ethics and Information Technology 3 (4):277–287.score: 112.0
    Many people have a strong intuition that there is something morally objectionable about playing violent video games, particularly with increases in the number of people who are playing them and the games' alleged contribution to some highly publicized crimes. In this paper,I use the framework of utilitarian, deontological, and virtue ethical theories to analyze the possibility that there might be some philosophical foundation for these intuitions. I raise the broader question of whether or not participating in authentic (...)
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  32. Simon Ferrari & Ian Bogost (2013). Reviewing Games of Empire: Global Capitalism and Video Games. Continent 3 (1):50-52.score: 112.0
    Nick Dyer-Witheford and Greig de Peuter. Games of Empire: Global Capitalism and Video Games . Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press. 2009. 320pp. pbk. $19.95 ISBN-13: 978-0816666119. In Games of Empire , Nick Dyer-Witheford and Greig de Peuter expand an earlier study of “the video game industry as an aspect of an emerging postindustrial, post-Fordist capitalism” (xxix) to argue that videogames are “exemplary media of Empire” (xxix). Their notion of “Empire” is based on Michael Hardt and (...)
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  33. Andrew James Latham, Lucy L. M. Patston & Lynette J. Tippett (2013). Just How Expert Are 'Expert' Video-Game Players? Assessing the Experience and Expertise of Video-Game Players Across 'Action' Video-Game Genres. Frontiers in Psychology 4:941.score: 109.3
    Just how expert are ‘expert’ video-game players? Assessing the experience and expertise of video-game players across ‘action’ video-game genres.
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  34. Mike LaBossiere (2008). What Don't You Know?: Philosophical Provocations. Continuum.score: 105.0
    _ "LaBossiere brilliantly tackles many of the toughest ethical dilemmas of our times, from gender selection, cloning and sexual inequality to violence in the media and the conduct of warfare. In an age of snap judgments and stereotypes, he approaches his topics in a refreshingly open-minded fashion. His quick wit and firm knowledge of contemporary culture bring philosophy full-force into the 21st century." —Paul Halpern, Professor Of Physics, University Of The Sciences in Philadelphia and author of What's Science Ever (...)
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  35. Mihai D. Vasile (2008). Reasonableness and Language Games in Jurgen Habermas` Philosophy of Communication. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 39:245-266.score: 102.0
    The point of view expressed in the present research is directed towards the ideational “torsion” from rationalism to the “language-games” drawing up an analysis according to which one can notice the rationalist and post-rationalist aspects in the philosophy of communication, and the consequences of these perspectives, which could be of great interest as regards the philosophical concepts related to communication, to man or to the human community. As a matter of fact, “the torsion” is only apparent; it cannot (...)
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  36. Karen Collins (2013). Playing with Sound: A Theory of Interacting with Sound and Music in Video Games. The Mit Press.score: 97.3
    In "Playing with Sound," Karen Collins examines video game sound from the player's perspective.
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  37. C. Shawn Green, Renjie Li & Daphne Bavelier (2010). Perceptual Learning During Action Video Game Playing. Topics in Cognitive Science 2 (2):202-216.score: 96.0
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  38. C. S. Green & D. Bavelier (2006). Enumeration Versus Multiple Object Tracking: The Case of Action Video Game Players. Cognition 101 (1):217-245.score: 96.0
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  39. Jari Kätsyri, Riitta Hari, Niklas Ravaja & Lauri Nummenmaa (2013). Just Watching the Game Ain't Enough: Striatal fMRI Reward Responses to Successes and Failures in a Video Game During Active and Vicarious Playing. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 94.7
    Although the multimodal stimulation provided by modern audiovisual video games is pleasing by itself, the rewarding nature of video game playing depends critically also on the players’ active engagement in the gameplay. The extent to which active engagement influences dopaminergic brain reward circuit responses remains unsettled. Here we show that striatal reward circuit responses elicited by successes (wins) and failures (losses) in a video game are stronger during active than vicarious gameplay. Eleven healthy males both played (...)
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  40. Bernie DeKoven (2013). The Well-Played Game: A Player's Philosophy. Mit Press.score: 92.0
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  41. Jaakko Hintikka (1973). Logic, Language-Games and Information: Kantian Themes in the Philosophy of Logic. Oxford,Clarendon Press.score: 90.0
    I LOGIC IN PHILOSOPHYPHILOSOPHY OF LOGIC i. On the relation of logic to philosophy I n this book, the consequences of certain logical insights for ...
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  42. Kira Bailey, Robert West & Judson Kuffel (2013). What Would My Avatar Do? Gaming, Pathology, and Risky Decision Making. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 90.0
    Recent work has revealed a relationship between pathological video game use and increased impulsivity among children and adolescents. A few studies have also demonstrated increased risk-taking outside of the video game environment following game play, but this work has largely focused on one genre of video games (i.e., racing). Motivated by these findings, the aim of the current study was to examine the relationship between pathological and non-pathological video game use, impulsivity, and risky decision making. (...)
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  43. Manuel Bremer (2013). Colin McGinn , Truth by Analysis. Games, Names, and Philosophy . Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 33 (5):366-370.score: 90.0
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  44. Connie Romig Bradley J. Morris, Steve Croker, Corinne Zimmerman, Devin Gill (2013). Gaming Science: The “Gamification” of Scientific Thinking. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 90.0
    Science is critically important for advancing economics, health, and social well being in the 21st century. A scientifically literate workforce is one that is well suited to meet the challenges of an information economy. However, scientific thinking skills do not routinely develop and must be scaffolded via educational and cultural tools. In this paper we outline a rationale for why we believe that video games have the potential to be exploited for gain in science education. The premise we (...)
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  45. David Haugen (2012). Colin McGinn , Truth By Analysis: Games, Names, and Philosophy . Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 32 (4):310-312.score: 90.0
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  46. William Hart (2004). Evil: A Primer: A History of a Bad Idea From Beelzebub to Bin Laden. Thomas Dunne Books.score: 87.0
    "Today our nation saw evil." - President George W. Bush, September 11th 2001 Evil! Like a zombie back from the grave, it has arisen--a word many of us had long ago relegated to Sunday sermons, video games and horror flicks. But of course, evil is not old fashioned, nor has it ever gone away, and may be as robust as ever. So what is evil? Does it exist? Veteran journalist Bill Hart tries to drag evil out of the (...)
     
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  47. Boudewijn de Bruin (2005). Game Theory in Philosophy. Topoi 24 (2):197-208.score: 84.0
    Game theory is the mathematical study of strategy and conflict. It has wide applications in economics, political science, sociology, and, to some extent, in philosophy. Where rational choice theory or decision theory is concerned with individual agents facing games against nature, game theory deals with games in which all players have preference orderings over the possible outcomes of the game. This paper gives an informal introduction to the theory and a survey of applications in diverse branches of (...)
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  48. Geert Gooskens (2011). Beyond Good and Evil? Morality in Video Games. Philosophical Writings (1):37-44.score: 84.0
  49. Tim Button (2013). Truth by Analysis: Games, Names, and Philosophy By Colin McGinn. [REVIEW] Analysis 73 (3):577-580.score: 84.0
    In Truth by Analysis (2012), Colin McGinn aims to breathe new life into conceptual analysis. Sadly, he fails to defend conceptual analysis, either in principle or by example.
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  50. Aaron Smuts & Jonathan Frome (2004). Helpless Spectators: Suspense in Videogames and Film. Text Technology 1 (1):13-34.score: 84.0
    The most surprising conclusion of our analysis is that videogames can be most effective in generating suspense not by highlighting their unique ability to be interactive, but, to the contrary, limiting interactivity at key points, thereby turning players into helpless spectators like those that watch films. Discovering this technique in video games allows us to turn our attention back to film, where we are able to highlight a previously ignored feature of viewer film interaction, namely, helplessness.
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