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Profile: Vincent Bergeron (University of Ottawa)
  1. Dustin Stokes & Vincent Bergeron, Modular Architectures and Informational Encapsulation: A Dilemma.
    Amongst philosophers and cognitive scientists, modularity remains a popular choice for an architecture of the human mind, primarily because of the supposed explanatory value of this approach. Modular architectures can vary both with respect to the strength of the notion of modularity and the scope of the modularity of mind. We propose a dilemma for modular architectures, no matter how these architectures vary along these two dimensions. First, if a modular architecture commits to the informational encapsulation of modules, as it (...)
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  2. Vincent Bergeron (forthcoming). Functional Independence and Cognitive Architecture. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science.
    In cognitive science, the concept of dissociation has been central to the functional individuation and decomposition of cognitive systems. Setting aside debates about the legitimacy of inferring the existence of dissociable systems from behavioral dissociation data, the main idea behind the dissociation approach is that two cognitive systems are dissociable, and therefore viewed as distinct, if each can be damaged, or impaired, without affecting the other system’s functions. In this paper, I propose a notion of functional independence that does not (...)
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  3. Vincent Bergeron (2012). L'inférence Neuroarchéologique Inverse Et l'Évolution des Hiérarchies Humaines. Benoît Dubreuil, Human Evolution and the Origins of HierarchiesBenoît Dubreuil, Human Evolution and the Origins of Hierarchies. Philosophiques 39 (1):259-263.
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  4. Vincent Bergeron & Dominic McIver Lopes (2012). Aesthetic Theory and Aesthetic Science: Prospects for Integration. In Steven Palmer & Arthur Shimamura (eds.), , with Vincent Bergeron, Aesthetic Science: Connecting Minds, Brains, and Experience. Oxford University Press.
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  5. Vincent Bergeron (2010). Neuroaesthetics Edited by Skov, Martin and Oshin Vartanian. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 68 (2):191-192.
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  6. Vincent Bergeron (2010). Neural Reuse and Cognitive Homology. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33 (4):268-269.
    Neural reuse theories suggest that, in the course of evolution, a brain structure may acquire or lose a number of cognitive uses while maintaining its cognitive workings (or low-level operations) fixed. This, in turn, suggests that homologous structures may have very different cognitive uses, while sharing the same workings. And this, essentially, is homology thinking applied to brain function.
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  7. Vincent Bergeron & Dominic Mciver Lopes (2009). Hearing and Seeing Musical Expression. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 78 (1):1-16.
    Everybody assumes (1) that musical performances are sonic events and (2) that their expressive properties are sonic properties. This paper discusses recent findings in the psychology of music perception that show that visual information combines with auditory information in the perception of musical expression. The findings show at the very least that arguments are needed for (1) and (2). If music expresses what we think it does, then its expressive properties may be visual as well as sonic; and if its (...)
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  8. Vincent Bergeron & Mohan Matthen (2008). Assembling the Emotions. In Luc Faucher & Christine Tappolet (eds.), The Modularity of Emotions. University of Calgary Press. 185-212.
    In this article, we discuss the modularity of the emotions. In a general methodological section, we discuss the empirical basis for the postulation of modularity. Then we discuss how certain modules -- the emotions in particular -- decompose into distinct anatomical and functional parts.
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  9. Vincent Bergeron (2007). Anatomical and Functional Modularity in Cognitive Science: Shifting the Focus. Philosophical Psychology 20 (2):175 – 195.
    Much of cognitive science is committed to the modular approach to the study of cognition. The core of this approach consists of a pair of assumptions - the anatomical and the functional modularity assumptions - which motivate two kinds of inference: the anatomical and the functional modularity inferences. The legitimacy of both of these inferences has been strongly challenged, a situation that has had surprisingly little impact on most theorizing in the field. Following the introduction of an important, yet rarely (...)
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