Search results for 'Vincent Dru' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Joël Cretenet & Vincent Dru (2011). Influence of Bilateral Motor Behaviors on Flexible Functioning: An Embodied Perspective. Cognitive Science 35 (6):1139-1161.score: 150.0
    To examine the influence of bilateral motor behaviors on flexibility performance, two studies were conducted. Previous research has shown that when performing unilateral motor behavior that activates the affective and motivational systems of approach versus avoidance (arm flexion vs. extension), it is the congruence between laterality and motor activation that determines flexibility-rigidity functioning (Cretenet & Dru, 2009). When bilateral motor behaviors were performed, a mechanism of embodiment was revealed. It showed that the flexibility scores were determined by the match between (...)
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  2. Patricia Rulence-Pâques, Eric Fruchart, Vincent Dru & Etienne Mullet (2005). Cognitive Algebra in Sport Decision-Making. Theory and Decision 58 (4):387-406.score: 120.0
    Two studies examined whether simple algebraic rules that have been shown to be operative in many applied settings may also be found in sport decision-making. The theoretical framework for these studies was the Functional Theory of Cognition (Anderson, Contributions to information integration theory. Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum, 1996). The way in which novices but already experienced team sport players (soccer, basketball, and handball players) combine different informational cues (relative importance of the game, numerical status of the team, current score, and time (...)
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  3. Andrew Vincent (2010). The Politics of Human Rights. OUP Oxford.score: 60.0
    The Politics of Human Rights provides a systematic introductory overview of the nature and development of human rights. At the same time it offers an engaging argument about human rights and their relationship with politics. The author argues that human rights have only a slight relation to natural rights and they are historically novel: In large part they are a post-1945 reaction to genocide which is, in turn, linked directly to the lethal potentialities of the nation-state. He suggests that an (...)
     
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  4. Nicole A. Vincent (2010). On the Relevance of Neuroscience to Criminal Responsibility. Criminal Law and Philosophy 4 (1):77-98.score: 30.0
    Various authors debate the question of whether neuroscience is relevant to criminal responsibility. However, a plethora of different techniques and technologies, each with their own abilities and drawbacks, lurks beneath the label “neuroscience”; and in criminal law responsibility is not a single, unitary and generic concept, but it is rather a syndrome of at least six different concepts. Consequently, there are at least six different responsibility questions that the criminal law asks – at least one for each responsibility concept – (...)
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  5. Nicole A. Vincent (2007). Responsibility, Compensation and Accident Law Reform. Dissertation, University of Adelaidescore: 30.0
    This thesis considers two allegations which conservatives often level at no-fault systems — namely, that responsibility is abnegated under no-fault systems, and that no-fault systems under- and over-compensate. I argue that although each of these allegations can be satisfactorily met – the responsibility allegation rests on the mistaken assumption that to properly take responsibility for our actions we must accept liability for those losses for which we are causally responsible; and the compensation allegation rests on the mistaken assumption that tort (...)
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  6. Nicole A. Vincent (2009). What Do You Mean I Should Take Responsibility for My Own Ill Health? Journal of Applied Ethics and Philosophy 1 (1):39-51.score: 30.0
    Luck egalitarians think that considerations of responsibility can excuse departures from strict equality. However critics argue that allowing responsibility to play this role has objectionably harsh consequences. Luck egalitarians usually respond either by explaining why that harshness is not excessive, or by identifying allegedly legitimate exclusions from the default responsibility-tracking rule to tone down that harshness. And in response, critics respectively deny that this harshness is not excessive, or they argue that those exclusions would be ineffective or lacking in justification. (...)
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  7. Nicole A. Vincent (2006). Equality, Responsibility and Talent Slavery. Imprints 9 (2):118-39.score: 30.0
    Egalitarians must address two questions: i. What should there be an equality of, which concerns the currency of the ‘equalisandum’; and ii. How should this thing be allocated to achieve the so-called equal distribution? A plausible initial composite answer to these two questions is that resources should be allocated in accordance with choice, because this way the resulting distribution of the said equalisandum will ‘track responsibility’ — responsibility will be tracked in the sense that only we will be responsible for (...)
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  8. Nicole A. Vincent (2005). Compensation for Mere Exposure to Risk. Australian Journal of Legal Philosophy 29:89-101.score: 30.0
    It could be argued that tort law is failing, and arguably an example of this failure is the recent public liability and insurance (‘PL&I’) crisis. A number of solutions have been proposed, but ultimately the chosen solution should address whatever we take to be the cause of this failure. On one account, the PL&I crisis is a result of an unwarranted expansion of the scope of tort law. Proponents of this position sometimes argue that the duty of care owed by (...)
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  9. Nicole A. Vincent (2008). Book Review of "Torts, Egalitarianism and Distributive Justice" by Tsachi Keren-Paz. [REVIEW] Australian Journal of Legal Philosophy 33:199-204.score: 30.0
    In "Torts, Egalitarianism and Distributive Justice" (Ashgate, 2007), Tsachi Keren-Paz presents impressingly detailed analysis that bolsters the case in favour of incremental tort law reform. However, although this book's greatest strength is the depth of analysis offered, at the same time supporters of radical law reform proposals may interpret the complexity of the solution that is offered (and its respective cost) as conclusive proof that tort law can only take adequate account of egalitarian aims at an unacceptably high cost.
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  10. Andrew Vincent (2009). Patriotism and Human Rights: An Argument for Unpatriotic Patriotism. [REVIEW] Journal of Ethics 13 (4):347 - 364.score: 30.0
    This paper centres on the question as to whether human rights can be reconciled with patriotism. It lays out the more conventional arguments which perceive them as incommensurable concepts. A central aspect of this incommensurability relates to the close historical tie between patriotism and the state. One further dimension of this argument is then articulated, namely, the contention that patriotism is an explicitly political concept. The implicit antagonism between, on the one hand, the state, politics and patriotism, and, on the (...)
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  11. Nicole A. Vincent (2009). Responsibility: Distinguishing Virtue From Capacity. Polish Journal of Philosophy 3 (1):111-26.score: 30.0
    Garrath Williams claims that truly responsible people must possess a “capacity … to respond [appropriately] to normative demands” (2008:462). However, there are people whom we would normally praise for their responsibility despite the fact that they do not yet possess such a capacity (e.g. consistently well-behaved young children), and others who have such capacity but who are still patently irresponsible (e.g. some badly-behaved adults). Thus, I argue that to qualify for the accolade “a responsible person” one need not possess such (...)
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  12. Nicole A. Vincent (2009). Neuroimaging and Responsibility Assessments. Neuroethics 4 (1):35-49.score: 30.0
    Could neuroimaging evidence help us to assess the degree of a person’s responsibility for a crime which we know that they committed? This essay defends an affirmative answer to this question. A range of standard objections to this high-tech approach to assessing people’s responsibility is considered and then set aside, but I also bring to light and then reject a novel objection—an objection which is only encountered when functional (rather than structural) neuroimaging is used to assess people’s responsibility.
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  13. Nicole A. Vincent, Pim Haselager & Gert-Jan Lokhorst (2011). “The Neuroscience of Responsibility”—Workshop Report. Neuroethics 4 (2):175-178.score: 30.0
    This is a report on the 3-day workshop “The Neuroscience of Responsibility” that was held in the Philosophy Department at Delft University of Technology in The Netherlands during February 11th–13th, 2010. The workshop had 25 participants from The Netherlands, Germany, Italy, UK, USA, Canada and Australia, with expertise in philosophy, neuroscience, psychology, psychiatry and law. Its aim was to identify current trends in neurolaw research related specifically to the topic of responsibility, and to foster international collaborative research on this topic. (...)
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  14. Nicole A. Vincent (2001). What is at Stake in Taking Responsibility? Lessons From Third-Party Property Insurance. [Journal (Paginated)] (in Press) 20 (1):75-94.score: 30.0
    Third-party property insurance (TPPI) protects insured drivers who accidentally damage an expensive car from the threat of financial ruin. Perhaps more importantly though, TPPI also protects the victims whose losses might otherwise go uncompensated. Ought responsible drivers therefore take out TPPI? This paper begins by enumerating some reasons for why a rational person might believe that they have a moral obligation to take out TPPI. It will be argued that if what is at stake in taking responsibility is the ability (...)
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  15. Nicole A. Vincent (2008). Responsibility, Dysfunction and Capacity. Neuroethics 1 (3):199-204.score: 30.0
    The way in which we characterize the structural and functional differences between psychopath and normal brains – either as biological disorders or as mere biological differences – can influence our judgments about psychopaths’ responsibility for criminal misconduct. However, Marga Reimer (Neuroethics 1(2):14, 2008) points out that whether our characterization of these differences should be allowed to affect our judgments in this manner “is a difficult and important question that really needs to be addressed before policies regarding responsibility... can be implemented (...)
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  16. Nicole A. Vincent (2011). Legal Responsibility Adjudication and the Normative Authority of the Mind Sciences. Philosophical Explorations 14 (3):315-331.score: 30.0
    In the field of ?neurolaw?, reformists claim that recent scientific discoveries from the mind sciences have serious ramifications for how legal responsibility should be adjudicated, but conservatives deny that this is so. In contrast, I criticise both of these polar opposite positions by arguing that although scientific findings can have often-weighty normative significance, they lack the normative authority with which reformists often imbue them. After explaining why conservatives and reformists are both wrong, I then offer my own moderate suggestions about (...)
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  17. Andrew Vincent (2005). Nationalism and the Open Society. Theoria 44 (107):36-64.score: 30.0
    Nationalism has had a complex relation with the discipline of political theory during the 20th century. Political theory has often been deeply uneasy with nationalism in relation to its role in the events leading up to and during the Second World War. Many theorists saw nationalism as an overly narrow and potentially irrationalist doctrine. In essence it embodied a closed vision of the world. This article focuses on one key contributor to the immediate post-war debate—Karl Popper—who retained deep misgivings about (...)
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  18. Patrick Amar, Pascal Ballet, Georgia Barlovatz-Meimon, Arndt Benecke, Gilles Bernot, Yves Bouligand, Paul Bourguine, Franck Delaplace, Jean-Marc Delosme, Maurice Demarty, Itzhak Fishov, Jean Fourmentin-Guilbert, Joe Fralick, Jean-Louis Giavitto, Bernard Gleyse, Christophe Godin, Roberto Incitti, François Képès, Catherine Lange, Lois Le Sceller, Corinne Loutellier, Olivier Michel, Franck Molina, Chantal Monnier, René Natowicz, Vic Norris, Nicole Orange, Helene Pollard, Derek Raine, Camille Ripoll, Josette Rouviere-Yaniv, Milton Saier, Paul Soler, Pierre Tambourin, Michel Thellier, Philippe Tracqui, Dave Ussery, Jean-Claude Vincent, Jean-Pierre Vannier, Philippa Wiggins & Abdallah Zemirline (2002). Hyperstructures, Genome Analysis and I-Cells. Acta Biotheoretica 50 (4).score: 30.0
    New concepts may prove necessary to profit from the avalanche of sequence data on the genome, transcriptome, proteome and interactome and to relate this information to cell physiology. Here, we focus on the concept of large activity-based structures, or hyperstructures, in which a variety of types of molecules are brought together to perform a function. We review the evidence for the existence of hyperstructures responsible for the initiation of DNA replication, the sequestration of newly replicated origins of replication, cell division (...)
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  19. R. H. Vincent (1963). Logical Foundations of Probability. By Rudolf Carnap. Second Edition, 1962. The University of Chicago Press. Pp. Xxii and 613. $10.00. [REVIEW] Dialogue 2 (01):97-101.score: 30.0
  20. Andrew Vincent (1994). Philip Pettit, The Common Mind: An Essay on Psychology, Society, and Politics, Oxford, Oxford University Press, 1993, Pp. Xiv + 365. Utilitas 6 (02):319-.score: 30.0
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  21. Andrew W. Vincent (1989). Can Groups Be Persons? Review of Metaphysics 42 (4):687-715.score: 30.0
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  22. A. W. Vincent & Michael George (1982). Development and Self-Identity: Hegel's Concept of Education. Educational Theory 32 (3-4):131-141.score: 30.0
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  23. Charles Vincent & Jean Camp (2004). Looking to the Internet for Models of Governance. Ethics and Information Technology 6 (3):161-173.score: 30.0
    If code is law then standards bodies are governments. This flawed but powerful metaphor suggests the need to examine more closely those standards bodies that are defining standards for the Internet. In this paper we examine the International Telecommunications Union, the Institute for Electrical and Electronics Engineers Standards Association, the Internet Engineering Task Force, and the World Wide Web Consortium. We compare the organizations on the basis of participation, transparency, authority, openness, security and interoperability. We conclude that the IETF and (...)
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  24. R. H. Vincent (1975). Selective Confirmation and the Ravens. Dialogue 14 (01):3-49.score: 30.0
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  25. Marice Ashe, Gary Bennett, Christina Economos, Elizabeth Goodman, Joe Schilling, Lisa Quintiliani, Sara Rosenbaum, Jeff Vincent & Aviva Must (2009). Assessing Coordination of Legal-Based Efforts Across Jurisdictions and Sectors for Obesity Prevention and Control. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 37:45-54.score: 30.0
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  26. R. H. Vincent (1973). The Popper-Carnap Controversy. By Alex C. Michalos. The Hague, Netherlands: Martinus Nijhoff, 1971. Pp. X and 124. Guilders 22.50. [REVIEW] Dialogue 12 (02):365-370.score: 30.0
  27. A. Vincent (2003). Patriotism. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 81 (3):455-456.score: 30.0
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  28. Aviva Must, Gary Bennett, Christina Economos, Elizabeth Goodman, Joe Schilling, Lisa Quintiliani, Sara Rosenbaum, Jeff Vincent & Marice Ashe (2009). Improving Coordination of Legal-Based Efforts Across Jurisdictions and Sectors for Obesity Prevention and Control. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 37:90-98.score: 30.0
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  29. Nicole Vincent, Ibo van de Poel & Jeroen van den Hoven (eds.) (2011). Moral Responsibility: Beyond Free Will and Determinism. Springer.score: 30.0
    This book'¬"s chapters deal with a range of theoretical problems discussed in classic compatibilist literature '¬ ; e.g. the relationship between ...
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  30. Vern C. Vincent & Wig De Moville (1993). Ethical Considerations for Streaming Business Publications. Journal of Business Ethics 12 (1):37 - 43.score: 30.0
    This exploratory ethics study of a publication and presentation practice herein defined as streaming investigates the attitudes of deans of schools of business and business professors regarding such behavior. Streaming publications is the practice of presenting or publishing an article at one outlet and then taking the same article with perhaps minor revisions and presenting or publishing it at another publication outlet. The results of the survey suggest that the most important ethical behavior regarding streaming practices is disclosure. If authors (...)
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  31. R. H. Vincent (1961). Goodman and Relevant Conditions. Philosophical Studies 12 (1-2):28 - 29.score: 30.0
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  32. Denis Vincent (2009). Le Spécialiste En Médecine Interne, Véritable Expert Judiciaire ? Médecine and Droit 2009 (98-99):152-154.score: 30.0
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  33. R. H. Vincent (1962). Popper on Qualitative Confirmation and Disconfirmation. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 40 (2):159 – 166.score: 30.0
  34. R. H. Vincent (1962). The Concept of Method. By Justus Buchler. Columbia University Press, New York and London, 1961, Pp. Viii, 180. $4.00. [REVIEW] Dialogue 1 (02):220-221.score: 30.0
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  35. R. H. Vincent (1962). The Paradox of Ideal Evidence. Philosophical Review 71 (4):497-503.score: 30.0
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  36. Heather Vincent (2009). Visual Humour (J.R.) Clarke Looking at Laughter. Humor, Power, and Transgression in Roman Visual Culture, 100 B.C.–A.D. 250. Pp. Xii + 322, Ills, Colour Pls. Berkeley, Los Angeles and London: University of California Press, 2007. Cased, US$32.95. ISBN: 978-0-520-23733-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 59 (01):257-.score: 30.0
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  37. Andrew Vincent (2005). Book Review: Prolegomena to Ethics. [REVIEW] Journal of Moral Philosophy 2 (1):109-111.score: 30.0
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  38. Vida Carver & P. Vincent (1964). The British Society of Aesthetics. British Journal of Aesthetics 4 (2):135-135.score: 30.0
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  39. Édouard Le Roy & Georges Vincent (1894). Sur la méthode mathématique. Revue de Métaphysique Et de Morale 2 (6):676 - 708.score: 30.0
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  40. Bernadette Bensaude Vincent (2009). Nanotechnology and Society. Techné 13 (1):69-70.score: 30.0
  41. Gilbert Vincent (2001). The Engagement of French Protestantism in Solidarism. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 4 (4):401-421.score: 30.0
    It is conventional to think of modernity as being characterised by the irremediable separation of philosophy and theology, of reason and faith. Failing to reconsider the idea of such a divorce, post-modernity has pushed this postulate to its very limits by attempting to abolish all types of normativity whether on the grounds of reason or any other basis. Against these prevailing conceptions, we argue that there exist, within philosophy and theology, processes of differentiation as well as original combinations. To illustrate (...)
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  42. Louis-Marie Vincent (1993). Theory of Data Transferal. Acta Biotheoretica 41 (1-2).score: 30.0
    A new approach to information is proposed with the intention of providing a conceptual tool adapted to biology, including a semantic value.Information involves a material support as well as a significance, adapted to the cognitive domain of the receiver and/or the transmitter. A message does not carry any information, only data. The receiver makes an identification by a procedure of recognition of the forms, which activate previously learned significance. This treatment leads to a new significance (or new knowledge).
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  43. D. H. Vincent (1964). The Paradoxes of Confirmation. Mind 73 (290):273-279.score: 30.0
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  44. C. J. Vincent (1963). The Pilgrimage of Life. By Samuel C. Chew. Yale University Press, 1961, Pp. Xxv, 524, 155 Prints, Notes and Index. $15.00. [REVIEW] Dialogue 2 (01):112-113.score: 30.0
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  45. Nicole Vincent (2001). What is at Stake in Taking Responsibility? Business and Professional Ethics Journal 20 (1):75-94.score: 30.0
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  46. Denis Noble, Jean Didier Vincent & György Ádám (eds.) (1997). The Ethics of Life. Unesco Pub..score: 30.0
     
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  47. Édouard Le Roy & G. Vincent (1896). Sur l'idée de nombre. Revue de Métaphysique Et de Morale 4 (6):738 - 755.score: 30.0
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  48. John Russell Vincent (2006). An Intelligent Person's Guide to History. Duckworth Overlook.score: 30.0
  49. R. H. Vincent (1961). A Note on Some Quantitative Theories of Confirmation. Philosophical Studies 12 (6):91 - 92.score: 30.0
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  50. P. Vincent & Pat Statham (1967). British Society of Aesthetics. British Journal of Aesthetics 7 (3):307-307.score: 30.0
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