Search results for 'Violence Forecasting' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Andrew Linzey (ed.) (2009). The Link Between Animal Abuse and Human Violence. Sussex Academic Press.score: 96.0
    This book is about the link between animal abuse and human violence.
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  2. Renzo Taddei (2012). The Politics of Uncertainty and the Fate of Forecasters. Ethics, Policy and Environment 15 (2):252 - 267.score: 34.0
    Using ethnographic data from rural Northeast Brazil, this article explores, firstly, how climate uncertainties are interconnected to processes of accountability and blame, and, secondly, how this connection affects the activity of climate forecasting. By framing climate events in ways that downplay the inherent uncertainties of the atmosphere, political discourses on various scales, as well as religious narratives, create a propitious context for the enactment of what I call accountability rituals. Forecasters seem to attract to themselves a great deal of (...)
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  3. Marilea Bramer (2011). Domestic Violence as a Violation of Autonomy and Agency. Social Philosophy Today 27:97-110.score: 24.0
    Contrary to what we might initially think, domestic violence is not simply a violation of respect. This characterization of domestic violence misses two key points. First, the issue of respect in connection with domestic violence is not as straightforward as it appears. Second, domestic violence is also a violation of care. These key points explain how domestic violence negatively affects a victim’s autonomy and agency—the ability to choose and pursue her own goals and life plan.We (...)
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  4. Virginia Held (1997). The Media and Political Violence. Journal of Ethics 1 (2):187-202.score: 24.0
    The meanings of violence, political violence, and terrorism are briefly discussed. I then consider the responsibilities of the media, especially television, with respect to political violence, including such questions as how violence should be described, and whether the media should cover terrorism. I argue that the media should contribute to decreasing political violence through better coverage of arguments for and against political dissidents'' views, and especially through more and better treatment of nonviolent means of influencing (...)
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  5. Boudewijn de Bruin (2008). Media Violence and Freedom of Speech: How to Use Empirical Data. [REVIEW] Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 11 (5):493-505.score: 24.0
    Susan Hurley has argued against a well known argument for freedom of speech, the argument from autonomy, on the basis of two hypotheses about violence in the media and aggressive behaviour. The first hypothesis says that exposure to media violence causes aggressive behaviour; the second, that humans have an innate tendency to copy behaviour in ways that bypass conscious deliberation. I argue, first, that Hurley is not successful in setting aside the argument from autonomy. Second, I show that (...)
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  6. Zachary Davis (2009). A Phenomenology of Political Apathy: Scheler on the Origins of Mass Violence. [REVIEW] Continental Philosophy Review 42 (2):149-169.score: 24.0
    In his criticisms of the German youth movement and the emergence of fascism across Europe during the early 1920s, Max Scheler draws a distinction between the different senses of political apathy that give rise to mass political movements. Recent studies of mass apathy have tended to treat all forms of apathy as the same and as a consequence reduced the diverse expressions of mass violence to the same, stripping mass movements of any critical function. I show in this paper (...)
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  7. Peg Birmingham (2011). Arendt and Hobbes: Glory, Sacrificial Violence, and the Political Imagination. Research in Phenomenology 41 (1):1-22.score: 24.0
    The dominant narrative today of modern political power, inspired by Foucault, is one that traces the move from the spectacle of the scaffold to the disciplining of bodies whereby the modern political subject, animated by a fundamental fear and the will to live, is promised security in exchange for obedience and productivity. In this essay, I call into question this narrative, arguing that that the modern political imagination, rooted in Hobbes, is animated not by fear but instead by the desire (...)
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  8. Matthew L. Baum (2013). The Monoamine Oxidase A (MAOA) Genetic Predisposition to Impulsive Violence: Is It Relevant to Criminal Trials? Neuroethics 6 (2):287-306.score: 24.0
    In Italy, a judge reduced the sentence of a defendant by 1 year in response to evidence for a genetic predisposition to violence. The best characterized of these genetic differences, those in the monoamine oxidase A (MAOA), were cited as especially relevant. Several months previously in the USA, MAOA data contributed to a jury reducing charges from 1st degree murder (a capital offence) to voluntary manslaughter. Is there a rational basis for this type of use of MAOA evidence in (...)
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  9. Robert Audi (1997). Preventing Abortion as a Test Case for the Justifiability of Violence. Journal of Ethics 1 (2):141-163.score: 24.0
    This paper explores the rationale for violence and coercion aimed at preventing abortion conceived as the killing of an innocent person. Some important arguments for personhood at conception are examined, and in the light of the examination the paper considers whether they warrant concluding that a free and democratic society should pass laws recognizing personhood at conception. The wider concern is what principles such a society should use as a basis for legal coercion and what principles conscientious individuals should (...)
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  10. Thomas Nadelhoffer, Stephanos Bibas, Scott Grafton, Kent Kiehl, Andrew Mansfield, Walter Sinnott-Armstrong & Michael Gazzaniga (2012). Neuroprediction, Violence, and the Law: Setting the Stage. [REVIEW] Neuroethics 5 (1):67-99.score: 24.0
    In this paper, our goal is to (a) survey some of the legal contexts within which violence risk assessment already plays a prominent role, (b) explore whether developments in neuroscience could potentially be used to improve our ability to predict violence, and (c) discuss whether neuropredictive models of violence create any unique legal or moral problems above and beyond the well worn problems already associated with prediction more generally. In Violence Risk Assessment and the Law , (...)
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  11. Howard Adelman (2009). Research on the Ethics of War in the Context of Violence in Gaza. Journal of Academic Ethics 7 (1-2):93-113.score: 24.0
    The paper first demonstrates the ability to provode objective data and analyses during war and then examines the need for such objective gathering of data and analysis in the context of mass violence and war, specifically in the 2009 Gaza War. That data and analysis is required to assess compliance with just war norms in assessing the conduct of the war, a framework quite distinct from human rights norms that can misapply and deform the application of norms such as (...)
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  12. Jeffrey Hanson (2010). Returning (to) the Gift of Death: Violence and History in Derrida and Levinas. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 67 (1):1 - 15.score: 24.0
    The purpose of this paper is to establish a proper context for reading Jacques Derrida's The Gift of Death, which, I contend, can only be understood fully against the backdrop of "Violence and Metaphysics." The later work cannot be fully understood unless the reader appreciates the fact that Derrida returns to "a certain Abraham" not only in the name of Kierkegaard but also in the name of Levinas himself. The hypothesis of the reading that follows therefore would be that (...)
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  13. Domenic Marbaniang (2008). Anatomy of Religious Violence. Basileia 1 (1):24.score: 24.0
    Religious violence is a function of deep philosophical and psychological belief-behavior. This article explores the issue in light of Hinduism, Islam, Christianity, and Psychology of evil.
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  14. Donovan Miyasaki (2008). La Violence Politique Comme Mauvaise Foi Dans Le Sang des Autres. In Julia Kristeva, Pascale Fautrier, Anne Strasser & Pierre-Louis Fort (eds.), (Re) découvrir l’œuvre de Simone de Beauvoir – Du Deuxième Sexe à La Cérémonie des adieux. Éditions Le Bord de l’Eau.score: 24.0
    The Blood of Others begins at the bedside of a mortally wounded Résistance fighter named Hélène Bertrand. We encounter her from the point of view of Jean Blomart, her friend and lover, who recounts the story of their relationship : their first meeting, unhappy romance, bitter breakup, and eventual reunion as fellow fighters for the liberation of occupied France. The novel invites the reader to interpret Hélène and Jean’s story as one of positive ethical development. On this progressive reading, although (...)
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  15. Michael Staudigl (2007). Towards a Phenomenological Theory of Violence: Reflections Following Merleau-Ponty and Schutz. [REVIEW] Human Studies 30 (3):233 - 253.score: 24.0
    This paper lays the groundwork for developing a thorough-going phenomenological description of different phenomena of violence such as physical, psychic and structural violence. The overall aim is to provide subject-centered approaches to violence within the social sciences and the humanities with an integrative theoretical framework. To do so, I will draw primarily on the phenomenological accounts of Maurice Merleau-Ponty and Alfred Schutz, and thereby present guiding clues for a phenomenologically grounded theory of violence.
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  16. John Teehan (2010). In the Name of God: The Evolutionary Origins of Religious Ethics and Violence. Wiley-Blackwell.score: 24.0
    Introduction: Evolution and mind -- The evolution of morality -- Setting the task -- The moral brain -- The first layer : kin selection -- The second layer : reciprocal altruism -- A third layer : indirect reciprocity -- A fourth layer : cultural group selection -- A fifth layer : the moral emotions -- Conclusion: From moral grammar to moral systems -- The evolution of moral religions -- Setting the task -- The evolution of the religious mind -- Conceptualizing (...)
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  17. Thomas E. Hill (1997). A Kantian Perspective on Political Violence. Journal of Ethics 1 (2):105 - 140.score: 24.0
    Rejecting Kant''s absolute opposition to revolution, I propose a modified Kantian perspective for reflecting on political violence, drawing from Kant''s basic ideas but abandoning some dubious assumptions. Developing suggestions in earlier papers, the essay sketches a model for moral legislation that combines the core ideas of each of Kant''s formulas of the Categorical Imperative. Though only a framework for deliberation, not a complete decision procedure, this excludes extremist positions, prohibitive and permissive, about political violence. Despite Kant''s hopes, the (...)
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  18. Bruce B. Lawrence & Aisha Karim (eds.) (2007). On Violence: A Reader. Duke University Press.score: 24.0
    "This volume provides a long-needed anthology of major writings related to the subject of violence.
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  19. Charles K. Bellinger (2001). The Genealogy of Violence: Reflections on Creation, Freedom, and Evil. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    Various historians, philosophers, and social scientists have attempted to provide convincing explanations of the roots of violence, with mixed and confusing results. This book brings Kierkegaard's voice into this conversation in a powerful way, arguing that the Christian intellectual tradition offers the key philosophical tools needed for comprehending human pathology.
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  20. Robert Keith Shaw (2010). The Violence in Learning. Analysis and Metaphysics 9:76-100.score: 24.0
    This paper argues that learning is inherently violent. It examines the way in which Heidegger uses – and refrains from using – the concept in his account of Dasein. Heidegger explicitly discussed “learning” in 1951 and he used of the word in several contexts. Although he confines his use of “learning” to the ontic side of the ontic-ontological divide, there are aspects of what he says that open the door to an ontological analogue of the ontic learning. In this discussion (...)
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  21. Tobias Roehl & Herbert Kalthoff (2013). Remarks on Violence and Intersubjectivity. Human Studies 36 (1):111-119.score: 24.0
    The article connects a sociological perspective on violence to the problem of intersubjectivity. After an overview of sociological and cultural accounts of violence, we turn to a fundamental problem caused by the experience of violence. In dialogue with Frances Chaput Wakslers book on The New Orleans Sniper (2010) we discuss a case in which the problem of intersubjectivity figures prominently. The erratic nature of violent acts committed by an unseen sniper is experienced as existential crisis in which (...)
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  22. Robert Buch (2011). The Pathos of the Real: On the Aesthetics of Violence in the Twentieth Century. Johns Hopkins University Press.score: 24.0
    In praise of cruelty : Bataille, Kafka, and Ling-Chi -- Fragmentary description of a disaster : Claude Simon -- The resistance to pathos and the pathos of resistance : Peter Weiss -- Medeamachine : the "fallout" of violence in Heiner Müller -- Epilogue : Francis Bacon, or, The brutality of fact.
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  23. Florence Burgat (2004). Non-Violence Towards Animals in the Thinking of Gandhi: The Problem of Animal Husbandry. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 17 (3):223-248.score: 24.0
    The question of the imperatives induced by the Gandhian concept of non-violence towards animals is an issue that has been neglected by specialists on the thinking of the Mahatma. The aim of this article is to highlight the systematic – and significant – character of this particular aspect of his views on non-violence. The first part introduces the theoretical foundations of the duty of non-violence towards animals in general. Gandhi's critical interpretation of cow-protection, advocated by Hinduism, leads (...)
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  24. Jason Royce Lindsey (2013). Vattimo's Renunciation of Violence. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 16 (1):99-111.score: 24.0
    For Gianni Vattimo, the renunciation of violence is the starting point for constructing a post foundational politics. So far, criticism of Vattimo’s argument has focused on his larger commitment to metaphysical nihilism and whether the renunciation of violence is a thicker principle than his post foundational philosophy can support. I argue that Vattimo’s renunciation of violence can also be criticized for two other reasons. First, Vattimo attempts to distinguish between acceptable and unacceptable uses of violence through (...)
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  25. Geoffrey Rees (2011). Is Sex Worth Dying For? Sentimental-Homicidal-Suicidal Violence in Theological Discourse of Sexuality. Journal of Religious Ethics 39 (2):261-285.score: 24.0
    In theological discourse of sexuality, queer theory has often been regarded as an extension of the project of gay and lesbian liberation, when it actually challenges an organizing value of the entire discourse, because it challenges any ascription of ultimate value to "sex," an imaginative formation of power relations. Rather than appeal to God to authorize the privileged status of sex, queer commentary suggests that theological writers should refuse assertions of the absolute importance of any particular formation of human imagination (...)
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  26. Brian Schroeder (1996). Altared Ground: Levinas, History, and Violence. Routledge.score: 24.0
    One of the most pressing concerns for contemporary society is the issue of violence and the factors that promote it. In Altared Ground: Levinas, History and Violence , Brian Schroeder stages an engagement between Emmanuel Levinas, one of the leading figures in 20th century Continental philosophy, and Plato, Hegel, Heidegger, Nietzsche, Merleau-Ponty, Derrida and others in the history of ideas. Not merely an exposition of Levinas' original and complex ethical thinking, Brian Schroeder seeks to re-read the history of (...)
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  27. Alphonso Lingis (2011). Violence and Splendor. Northwestern University Press.score: 24.0
    Part 1. Spaces within spaces -- 1. Extremes -- 2. Nature abhors a vacuum -- 3. Space travel -- 4. Learn to say -- 5. Metaphysical habitats -- 6. Departures -- 7. Plumage and talismans -- 8. Inner space -- Part 2. Snares for the eyes -- 9. The fallen giant -- 10. The stone -- 11. The voices of things -- 12. Nature and art -- 13. Nature -- 14. In touch -- Part. 3. The sacred -- 15. Sacrilege (...)
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  28. Anél Boshoff (2013). Law and Its Rhetoric of Violence. International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 26 (2):425-437.score: 24.0
    This article explores the manner in which politico-legal language makes use of metaphors of violence and destruction in order to describe state/legal functions and actions. It argues that although such use of a militaristic hyperbole is generally regarded as normal and appropriate, it is in fact harmful in the way that it presents complex and specific problems as being simple and abstract. From a semiotic point of view, and using the work of Roland Barthes, law is regarded as a (...)
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  29. Johanna Oksala (2012). Foucault, Politics, and Violence. Northwestern University Press.score: 24.0
    The politicization of ontology -- Foundational violence -- Dangerous animals -- The politics of gendered violence -- Political life -- The management of state violence -- The political ontology of neoliberalism -- Violence and neoliberal governmentality -- Terror and political spirituality.
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  30. Shanta Premawardhana (2011). GREED AS VIOLENCE: Methodological Challenges in Interreligious Dialogue on the Ethics of the Global Financial Crisis. Journal of Religious Ethics 39 (2):223-245.score: 24.0
    The current financial crisis is one rooted not in recent deregulation but in the breaking of ancient (religious) laws, and this crisis is one of many ethical problems today that have religious roots. The tone of this essay is informed by a document from the World Council of Churches, which affirms "greed as violence" and that Christians do not have all the answers to the problem of greed; therefore, Christians need to seek solutions with other religious communities. Furthermore, religious (...)
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  31. Gitte Jantzen & Jans F. Jensen (1993). Powerplay — Power, Violence and Gender in Video Games. AI and Society 7 (4):368-385.score: 24.0
    Unlike the bulk of electronic media the computer game or video game is a distinctly gendered medium. All investigations confirm that we are dealing with a medium which almost exclusively appeals to and is used by, boys and young men. Therefore, the video games and computer games are very suited for investigating the form of entertainment, the pleasure, that appeals to men, i.e. the specific ‘masculine pleasure’.The paper deals with questions such as: What do computer games mean? What does (...) in computer games signify? Why do computer games, especially the violent ones, mean something special to a certain group of men? These questions are discussed from the perspective of semiotics, media and control studies.Finally, the paper discusses the connections between women and the male dominated video games, and attempts to explain why, nevertheless, some girls and women do play these games. (shrink)
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  32. Michael Staudigl (2013). Towards a Relational Phenomenology of Violence. Human Studies 36 (1):43-66.score: 24.0
    This article elaborates a relational phenomenology of violence. Firstly, it explores the constitution of all sense in its intrinsic relation with our embodiment and intercorporality. Secondly, it shows how this relational conception of sense and constitution paves the path for an integrative understanding of the bodily and symbolic constituents of violence. Thirdly, the author addresses the overall consequences of these reflections, thereby identifying the main characteristics of a relational phenomenology of violence. In the final part, the paper (...)
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  33. Thomas E. Hill Jr (1997). A Kantian Perspective on Political Violence. Journal of Ethics 1 (2):105-140.score: 24.0
    Rejecting Kant's absolute opposition to revolution, I propose a modified Kantian perspective for reflecting on political violence, drawing from Kant's basic ideas but abandoning some dubious assumptions. Developing suggestions in earlier papers, the essay sketches a model for “moral legislation” that combines the core ideas of each of Kant's formulas of the Categorical Imperative. Though only a framework for deliberation, not a complete decision procedure, this excludes extremist positions, prohibitive and permissive, about political violence. Despite Kant's hopes, the (...)
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  34. Lorenzo Magnani (2011). Understanding Violence: The Intertwining of Morality, Religion and Violence: A Philosophical Stance. Springer-Verlag.score: 24.0
    This volume sets out to give a philosophical "applied" account of violence, engaged with both empirical and theoretical debates in other disciplines such as cognitive science, sociology, psychiatry, anthropology, political theory, ...
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  35. Stephen Skinner (2013). Violence in Fascist Criminal Law Discourse: War, Repression and Anti-Democracy. [REVIEW] International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 26 (2):439-458.score: 24.0
    This article constructs a critical historical, political and theoretical analysis of the essence of Fascist criminal law discourse in terms of the violence that shaped and characterised it. The article examines the significance of violence in key declarations about the role and purpose of criminal law by Alfredo Rocco, Fascist Minister of Justice and leading ideologue, in his principal speech on the final draft of the 1930 Italian Penal Code. It is grounded on the premise that criminal law (...)
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  36. Paula Godoy-Paiz (2009). Women in Guatemala's Metropolitan Area: Violence, Law, and Social Justice. Studies in Social Justice 2 (1):27-47.score: 24.0
    In this article I examine the legal framework for addressing violence against women in post war Guatemala. Since the signing of the Peace Accords in 1996, judicial reform in Guatemala has included the passing of laws in the area of women‘s human rights, aimed at eliminating discrimination and violence against women. These laws constitute a response to and have occurred concurrently to an increase in violent crime against women, particularly in the form of mass rapes and murders. Drawing (...)
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  37. Christopher Mayes (2010). The Violence of Care: An Analysis of Foucault's Pastor. Journal of Cultural and Religious Theory.score: 24.0
    This paper will address Foucault’s analysis of the Hebrew and Christian pastor and argue that Foucault’s analysis of pastoral power in Security, Territory, Population neglects an important characteristic of the shepherd/pastor figure: violence. Despite Foucault’s close analysis of the early development of the Hebrew pastor, he overlooks the role of violence and instead focuses on sacrifice. However the sacrificial pastor does not figure in the Hebrew Scriptures. The Hebrew pastor is called to lead, feed and protect the flock, (...)
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  38. Martin Endreß & Andrea Pabst (2013). Violence and Shattered Trust: Sociological Considerations. [REVIEW] Human Studies 36 (1):89-106.score: 24.0
    The paper starts from a phenomenology of violence that reconsiders the phenomenal contours of the seemingly opposed concepts of violence, on the one hand physical violence and on the other hand structural violence. We argue that the implied definiteness of their reciprocal separableness is not given. Instead, violence should be understood as the negation of sociality. As such, it is closely related to a basic form of trust in relation to people’s self-awareness, and their relation (...)
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  39. Jason Wyckoff (2013). Is the Concept of Violence Normative? Revue Internationale de Philosophie 67 (3):337-352.score: 24.0
    Legitimist definitions of 'violence' are those that make explicit reference to the illegality, illegitimacy, or wrongfulness of the acts classified as acts of violence. All acts of violence, according to the legitimist definitions, involve a violation of some kind. I defend the view that legitimist definitions are defective—that notions like “wrongness” and “violation” are not part of the concept of violence. I offer three lines of argument: (1) that legitimist definitions of “violence” reduce the doctrine (...)
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  40. Sharon Cowan (forthcoming). Motivating Questions and Partial Answers: A Response to Prosecuting Domestic Violence by Michelle Madden Dempsey. [REVIEW] Criminal Law and Philosophy:1-13.score: 24.0
    Michelle Madden Dempsey’s compelling book sets out a normative feminist argument as to why and when prosecutors should continue to pursue prosecutions in domestic violence cases where the victim refuses to participate in or has withdrawn their support for the prosecution. This paper will explore two of the key aspects of her argument—the centrality and definition of the concept of patriarchy, and the definition of domestic violence—before concluding with some final thoughts as to the appropriate parameters of feminist (...)
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  41. Cecilia Menjívar (2009). Corporeal Dimensions of Gender Violence: Ladina's Self and Body in Eastern Guatemala. Studies in Social Justice 2 (1):12-26.score: 24.0
    Based on 30 in-depth interviews with Ladina women and field work conducted in a rural town in eastern Guatemala, I examine the physical expressions that violence can take on the women's bodies, such as common physical ailments that result from emotional distress as well as sicknesses that are caused directly by the conditions in which they live. A central theme in the discussion is the embodiment of violence as it is expressed in the control of the women's body (...)
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  42. James Mensch (2013). Violence and Selfhood. Human Studies 36 (1):25-41.score: 24.0
    Is violence senseless or is it at the origin of sense? Does its destruction of meaning disclose ourselves as the origin of meaning? Or is it the case that it leaves in its wake only a barren field? Does it result in renewal or only in a sense of dead loss? To answer these questions, I shall look at James Dodd’s, Hegel’s, and Carl Schmitt’s accounts of the creative power of violence—particularly with regard to its ability to give (...)
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  43. Anna Carastathis (2010). Fanon on Turtle Island: Revisiting the Question of Violence. In Elizabeth A. Hoppe & Tracey Nicholls (eds.), Fanon and the Decolonization of Philosophy. Lexington (Rowman & Littlefield). 77.score: 24.0
    In this chapter, I explore the role of violence in colonial rule and its role in decolonization struggle by posing the question, “what is alive in Fanon’s thought?” What can Fanon tell us about white settler state power and Fourth World decolonization struggles? I explore the relevance of Fanon’s account to the ongoing colonial situation on the northern part of Anówara Kawennote (Turtle Island), occupied by Canada. In this analysis, I am informed by Kanien’kehaka (Mohawk) political philosopher Taiaiake Alfred. (...)
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  44. Christian Huber & Iain Munro (2013). “Moral Distance” in Organizations: An Inquiry Into Ethical Violence in the Works of Kafka. Journal of Business Ethics:1-11.score: 24.0
    In this paper, we demonstrate that the works of Franz Kafka provide an exemplary resource for the investigation of “moral distance” in organizational ethics. We accomplish this in two ways, first by drawing on Kafka’s work to navigate the complexities of the debate over the ethics of bureaucracy, using his work to expand and enrich the concept of “moral distance.” Second, Kafka’s work is used to investigate the existence of “ethical violence” within organizations which entails acts of condemnation and (...)
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  45. Burkhard Liebsch (2013). What Does (Not) Count as Violence: On the State of Recent Debates About the Inner Connection Between Language and Violence. [REVIEW] Human Studies 36 (1):7-24.score: 24.0
    This paper raises the question whether language and violence are internally connected. It starts from the experience of violence and from its theoretical interpretation as violence in the context of political forms of life which are challenged by complaints about violence. Such forms of life have to confront this issue because they are supposed to be responsive to claims and demands of others who articulate violence as an experience of violation. Whether a kind of responsive (...)
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  46. Waseem Yaqoob (2014). Reconciliation and Violence: Hannah Arendt on Historical Understanding. Modern Intellectual History 11 (2):385-416.score: 24.0
    This essay reconstructs Hannah Arendt’s reading of Marx and Hegel in order to elucidate her critique of comprehensive philosophies of history. During the early 1950s Arendt endeavoured to develop a historical epistemology suitable to her then embryonic understanding of political action. Interpretations of her political thought either treat historical narrative as orthogonal to her central theoretical concerns, or focus on the role of “storytelling” in her writing. Both approaches underplay her serious consideration of the problem of historical understanding in the (...)
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  47. S. N. Balagangadhara & Sarah Claerhout (2010). Are Dialogues Antidotes to Violence? Two Recent Examples From Hinduism Studies. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 7 (19):118-143.score: 24.0
    One of the convictions in religious studies and elsewhere is about the role dialogues play: by fulfilling the need for understanding, dialogues reduce violence. In this paper, we analyze two examples from Hinduism studies to show that precisely the opposite is true: dialogue about Hinduism has become the harbinger of violence. This is not because ‘outsiders’ have studied Hinduism or because the Hindu participants are religious ‘fundamentalists’ but because of the logical requirements of such a dialogue. Generalizing the (...)
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  48. Horatiu Crisan (2010). Mark Juergensmeyer, Terror in the Mind of God. The Global Rise of Religious Violence. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 2 (4):179-181.score: 24.0
    Mark Juergensmeyer, Terror in the Mind of God. The Global Rise of Religious Violence University of California Press, Berkeley & L.A., 2001, 320 p.
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  49. Joseph Krulic (2005). De Grotius à Srebrenica. La violence et la régulation de la violence dans l'espace yougoslave : réflexions critiques sur l'archéologie de la balkanisation. Astérion 2.score: 24.0
    Joseph Krulic intervenant sur la logique de longue durée des affrontements dans les Balkans récuse le lieu commun des « haines ancestrales » au profit d’une analyse des violences de longue durée entre les communautés, mais aussi à l’intérieur des communautés (notamment en Serbie), à partir de l’examen du système international et d’une comparaison entre périodes de calme et périodes de troubles. Il a manqué dans l’espace balkanique une double régulation traditionnelle de la violence : d’une part, la régulation (...)
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  50. Burkhard Liebsch (2013). What Does (Not) "Count" as Violence: On the State of Recent Debates About the Inner Connection Between Language and Violence. [REVIEW] Human Studies 36 (1):7 - 24.score: 24.0
    This paper raises the question whether language and violence are internally connected. It starts from the experience of violence and from its theoretical interpretation as violence in the context of political forms of life which are challenged by complaints about violence. Such forms of life have to confront this issue because they are supposed to be responsive to claims and demands of others who articulate violence as an experience of violation. Whether a kind of responsive (...)
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