Search results for 'Violence Forecasting' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  21
    Andrew Linzey (ed.) (2009). The Link Between Animal Abuse and Human Violence. Sussex Academic Press.
    This book is about the link between animal abuse and human violence.
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  2. Amanda Cawston (2015). What is Violence? In Herjeet Marway & Heather Widdows (eds.), Women and Violence: The Agency of Victims and Perpetrators. Palgrave MacMillan 216-231.
    The aim of this chapter is to uncover a specifically political conception of violence which will capture our interest in violence as it relates to a fundamental problem for society. The chapter will first analyze (and reject) several existing definitions of violence in terms of whether they successfully describe a fundamental problem, then propose a new conception of violence that directs our attention towards problematic attitudes rather than types of actions. This new conception allows us to (...)
     
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  3. Marilea Bramer (2011). Domestic Violence as a Violation of Autonomy and Agency. Social Philosophy Today 27:97-110.
    Contrary to what we might initially think, domestic violence is not simply a violation of respect. This characterization of domestic violence misses two key points. First, the issue of respect in connection with domestic violence is not as straightforward as it appears. Second, domestic violence is also a violation of care. These key points explain how domestic violence negatively affects a victim’s autonomy and agency—the ability to choose and pursue her own goals and life plan.We (...)
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  4.  62
    Thomas Nadelhoffer, Stephanos Bibas, Scott Grafton, Kent Kiehl, Andrew Mansfield, Walter Sinnott-Armstrong & Michael Gazzaniga (2012). Neuroprediction, Violence, and the Law: Setting the Stage. [REVIEW] Neuroethics 5 (1):67-99.
    In this paper, our goal is to survey some of the legal contexts within which violence risk assessment already plays a prominent role, explore whether developments in neuroscience could potentially be used to improve our ability to predict violence, and discuss whether neuropredictive models of violence create any unique legal or moral problems above and beyond the well worn problems already associated with prediction more generally. In Violence Risk Assessment and the Law, we briefly examine the (...)
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  5. Todd Calder, Claudia Card, Ann Cudd, Eric Kraemer, Alice MacLachlan, Sarah Clark Miller, María Pía Lara, Robin May Schott, Laurence Thomas & Lynne Tirrell (2009). Evil, Political Violence, and Forgiveness: Essays in Honor of Claudia Card. Lexington Books.
    Rather than focusing on political and legal debates surrounding attempts to determine if and when genocidal rape has taken place in a particular setting, this essay turns instead to a crucial, yet neglected area of inquiry: the moral significance of genocidal rape, and more specifically, the nature of the harms that constitute the culpable wrongdoing that genocidal rape represents. In contrast to standard philosophical accounts, which tend to employ an individualistic framework, this essay offers a situated understanding of harm that (...)
     
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  6. Ronald E. Santoni (2003). Sartre on Violence: Curiously Ambivalent. Penn State University Press.
    From "Materialism and Revolution" through _Hope Now_, Jean-Paul Sartre was deeply engaged with questions about the meaning and justifiability of violence. In the first comprehensive treatment of Sartre’s views on the subject, Ronald Santoni begins by tracing the full trajectory of Sartre’s evolving thought on violence and shows how the "curious ambiguity" of freedom affirming itself against freedom in his earliest writings about violence developed into his "curiously ambivalent" position through his later writings.
     
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  7.  6
    Annabel Herzog (forthcoming). The Concept of Violence in the Work of Hannah Arendt. Continental Philosophy Review:1-15.
    Arendt claimed that violence is not part of the political because it is instrumental. Her position has generated a vast corpus of scholarship, most of which falls into the context of the realist-liberal divide. Taking these discussions as a starting point, this essay engages with violence in Arendt’s work from a different perspective. Its interest lies not in Arendt’s theory of violence in the world, but in the function that violence performed in her work, namely, in (...)
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  8. James Dodd (2009). Violence and Phenomenology. Routledge.
    Introduction: Reflections on violence -- Schmitt's challenge (Clausewitz, Schmitt) -- On violence (Arendt, Sartre) -- On the line (Junger, Heidegger) -- Violence and responsibility (Patoka) -- Conclusion: Six problems of violence.
     
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  9.  6
    Shreeya Popat & William Winslade (2015). While You Were Sleepwalking: Science and Neurobiology of Sleep Disorders & the Enigma of Legal Responsibility of Violence During Parasomnia. Neuroethics 8 (2):203-214.
    In terms of medical science and legal responsibility, the sleep disorder category of parasomnias, chiefly REM sleep behavior disorder and somnambulism, pose an enigmatic dilemma. During an episode of parasomnia, individuals are neither awake nor aware, but their actions appear conscious. As these actions move beyond the innocuous, such as eating and blurting out embarrassing information, and enter the realm of rape and homicide, their degree of importance and relevance increases exponentially. Parasomnias that result in illegal activity, particularly violence, (...)
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  10.  9
    Massimo Durante (2015). Violence, Just Cyber War and Information. Philosophy and Technology 28 (3):369-385.
    Cyber warfare has changed the scenario of war from an empirical and a theoretical viewpoint. Cyber war is no longer based on physical violence only, but on military, political, economic and ideological strategies meant to exploit a state’s informational resources. This means that a deeper understanding of what cyber war is requires us to adopt an informational approach. This approach may enable us to account for the two-dimensional nature of cyber war, to revise the notion of violence on (...)
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  11.  56
    Christopher Mayes (2010). The Violence of Care: An Analysis of Foucault's Pastor. Journal of Cultural and Religious Theory.
    This paper will address Foucault’s analysis of the Hebrew and Christian pastor and argue that Foucault’s analysis of pastoral power in Security, Territory, Population neglects an important characteristic of the shepherd/pastor figure: violence. Despite Foucault’s close analysis of the early development of the Hebrew pastor, he overlooks the role of violence and instead focuses on sacrifice. However the sacrificial pastor does not figure in the Hebrew Scriptures. The Hebrew pastor is called to lead, feed and protect the flock, (...)
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  12.  65
    Michael Staudigl (2007). Towards a Phenomenological Theory of Violence: Reflections Following Merleau-Ponty and Schutz. [REVIEW] Human Studies 30 (3):233 - 253.
    This paper lays the groundwork for developing a thorough-going phenomenological description of different phenomena of violence such as physical, psychic and structural violence. The overall aim is to provide subject-centered approaches to violence within the social sciences and the humanities with an integrative theoretical framework. To do so, I will draw primarily on the phenomenological accounts of Maurice Merleau-Ponty and Alfred Schutz, and thereby present guiding clues for a phenomenologically grounded theory of violence.
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  13.  76
    Matthew L. Baum (2013). The Monoamine Oxidase A (MAOA) Genetic Predisposition to Impulsive Violence: Is It Relevant to Criminal Trials? Neuroethics 6 (2):287-306.
    In Italy, a judge reduced the sentence of a defendant by 1 year in response to evidence for a genetic predisposition to violence. The best characterized of these genetic differences, those in the monoamine oxidase A (MAOA), were cited as especially relevant. Several months previously in the USA, MAOA data contributed to a jury reducing charges from 1st degree murder (a capital offence) to voluntary manslaughter. Is there a rational basis for this type of use of MAOA evidence in (...)
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  14.  8
    Lorenzo Magnani (2016). Violence Hexagon. Logica Universalis 10 (2-3):359-371.
    In this article I will show why and how it is useful to exploit the hexagon of opposition to have a better and new understanding of the relationships between morality and violence and of fundamental axiological concepts. I will take advantage of the analysis provided in my book Understanding Violence. The Intertwining of Morality, Religion, and Violence: A Philosophical Stance. Springer, Heidelberg/Berlin, 2011) to stress some aspects of the relationship between morality and violence, also reworking some (...)
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  15.  83
    Peg Birmingham (2011). Arendt and Hobbes: Glory, Sacrificial Violence, and the Political Imagination. Research in Phenomenology 41 (1):1-22.
    The dominant narrative today of modern political power, inspired by Foucault, is one that traces the move from the spectacle of the scaffold to the disciplining of bodies whereby the modern political subject, animated by a fundamental fear and the will to live, is promised security in exchange for obedience and productivity. In this essay, I call into question this narrative, arguing that that the modern political imagination, rooted in Hobbes, is animated not by fear but instead by the desire (...)
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  16.  6
    Ilja Srubar (forthcoming). Religion and Violence. Paradoxes of Religious Communication. Human Studies:1-18.
    Religion and violence are related in an ambivalent, paradoxical way, for the systems of religious knowledge tend to prohibit violence and to motivate it at the same time. This paper looks for the roots of that ambivalence and reveals particular mechanisms that generate violence within religious systems and their associated practices. It argues that violence in religious systems is present in at least three forms: It is inherent to communication with the “sacred,” it is generated by (...)
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  17.  5
    Alisa Bierria (2014). Missing in Action: Violence, Power, and Discerning Agency. Hypatia 29 (1):129-145.
    How can black feminist and women of color feminist theoretical interventions help create frameworks for discerning agentic action in the context of power, oppression, and violence? In this paper, I explore the social dimension of agency and argue that intention is not just authored by the agent as a function of practical reasoning, but is also socially authored through others' discernment and translation of her action. Further, when facilitated by reasoning designed to reinforce and rationalize systems of domination, social (...)
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  18.  26
    Johanna Oksala (2012). Foucault, Politics, and Violence. Northwestern University Press.
    The politicization of ontology -- Foundational violence -- Dangerous animals -- The politics of gendered violence -- Political life -- The management of state violence -- The political ontology of neoliberalism -- Violence and neoliberal governmentality -- Terror and political spirituality.
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  19.  36
    Sibongile Ndashe (2004). The Duty to Protect Women From Sexual Violence in South Africa. Feminist Legal Studies 12 (2):213-221.
    In 1998 Ghia Van Eeden was sexually assaulted by a serial rapist who had escaped from police custody due to the negligence of the South African police authorities. Claiming that the State owed a common law duty of care to potential victims to protect them from violent crimes, Van Eeden sought damages for the harm she had suffered. In a path-breaking decision, the Supreme Court of Appeal (S.C.A.) found that a duty of care did indeed exist and that its execution (...)
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  20.  60
    Jeffrey Benjamin White (2012). Reflections on Understanding Violence. Biosemiotics 5 (3):439-444.
    Lorenzo Magnani’s Understanding Violence: The Intertwining of Morality, Religion and Violence is a big 23 book. Not big in the sense of page count or prepublication advertisement, but big in the sense of pregnant 24 with potential application. Professor Magnani is explicit in his intentions, “to show how violence is de facto 25 intertwined with morality, and how much violence is hidden, and invisibly or unintentionally performed" 26 (page 273) while confessing a personal motivation, “warning myself (...)
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  21.  21
    Andrew Jason Cohen (2015). The Justification of Religious Violence, by Steve Clarke. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 94 (1):206-206.
  22.  1
    Lee T. Copping, Anne Campbell & Steven Muncer (2013). Violence, Teenage Pregnancy, and Life History. Human Nature 24 (2):137-157.
    Guided by principles of life history strategy development, this study tested the hypothesis that sexual precocity and violence are influenced by sensitivities to local environmental conditions. Two models of strategy development were compared: The first is based on indirect perception of ecological cues through family disruption and the second is based on both direct and indirect perception of ecological stressors. Results showed a moderate correlation between rates of violence and sexual precocity (r = 0.59). Although a model incorporating (...)
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  23.  22
    Lorenzo Magnani (2011). Understanding Violence: The Intertwining of Morality, Religion and Violence: A Philosophical Stance. Springer-Verlag.
    This volume sets out to give a philosophical "applied" account of violence, engaged with both empirical and theoretical debates in other disciplines such as cognitive science, sociology, psychiatry, anthropology, political theory, ...
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  24.  8
    Vittorio Morfino (2009). The Syntax of Violence. Between Hegel and Marx. Historical Materialism 17 (3):81-100.
    The Marxian Thesis about the role of violence in History, as it is enunciated in The Capital, is investigated through an analysis of the Hegelian character of its syntax, and the way Engels develops it; a non-teleological interpretation of the thesis is then defended, one that understands that violence presents a plurality of forms, a pervasive character and a heavy materiality.Trata-se de investigar a tese marxiana acerca do papel da violência na história, tal como enunciada em O Capital, (...)
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  25.  54
    Jeffrey Hanson (2010). Returning (to) the Gift of Death: Violence and History in Derrida and Levinas. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 67 (1):1 - 15.
    The purpose of this paper is to establish a proper context for reading Jacques Derrida's The Gift of Death, which, I contend, can only be understood fully against the backdrop of "Violence and Metaphysics." The later work cannot be fully understood unless the reader appreciates the fact that Derrida returns to "a certain Abraham" not only in the name of Kierkegaard but also in the name of Levinas himself. The hypothesis of the reading that follows therefore would be that (...)
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  26. Boudewijn de Bruin (2008). Media Violence and Freedom of Speech: How to Use Empirical Data. [REVIEW] Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 11 (5):493-505.
    Susan Hurley has argued against a well known argument for freedom of speech, the argument from autonomy, on the basis of two hypotheses about violence in the media and aggressive behaviour. The first hypothesis says that exposure to media violence causes aggressive behaviour; the second, that humans have an innate tendency to copy behaviour in ways that bypass conscious deliberation. I argue, first, that Hurley is not successful in setting aside the argument from autonomy. Second, I show that (...)
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  27. Virginia Held (1997). The Media and Political Violence. Journal of Ethics 1 (2):187-202.
    The meanings of violence, political violence, and terrorism are briefly discussed. I then consider the responsibilities of the media, especially television, with respect to political violence, including such questions as how violence should be described, and whether the media should cover terrorism. I argue that the media should contribute to decreasing political violence through better coverage of arguments for and against political dissidents'' views, and especially through more and better treatment of nonviolent means of influencing (...)
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  28.  35
    John Teehan (2010). In the Name of God: The Evolutionary Origins of Religious Ethics and Violence. Wiley-Blackwell.
    Introduction: Evolution and mind -- The evolution of morality -- Setting the task -- The moral brain -- The first layer : kin selection -- The second layer : reciprocal altruism -- A third layer : indirect reciprocity -- A fourth layer : cultural group selection -- A fifth layer : the moral emotions -- Conclusion: From moral grammar to moral systems -- The evolution of moral religions -- Setting the task -- The evolution of the religious mind -- Conceptualizing (...)
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  29.  95
    Domenic Marbaniang (2008). Anatomy of Religious Violence. Basileia 1 (1):24.
    Religious violence is a function of deep philosophical and psychological belief-behavior. This article explores the issue in light of Hinduism, Islam, Christianity, and Psychology of evil.
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  30.  9
    Gennady Shkliarevsky (2015). Overcoming Modernity and Violence. Cosmos and History: The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 11 (1):299-314.
    : Violence is one of the most pervasive problems in the world today. Despite all efforts to apply the powers of reason in order to contain, if not completely eliminate violence, violence proves to be capable of escaping capture and re-emerging in new and unexpected forms. Reason and rationality appear to be powerless against violence. The paper explores some philosophical issues that shed new light on the persistence of violence in the modern world. It argues (...)
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  31.  12
    Shanta Premawardhana (2011). GREED AS VIOLENCE: Methodological Challenges in Interreligious Dialogue on the Ethics of the Global Financial Crisis. Journal of Religious Ethics 39 (2):223-245.
    The current financial crisis is one rooted not in recent deregulation but in the breaking of ancient (religious) laws, and this crisis is one of many ethical problems today that have religious roots. The tone of this essay is informed by a document from the World Council of Churches, which affirms "greed as violence" and that Christians do not have all the answers to the problem of greed; therefore, Christians need to seek solutions with other religious communities. Furthermore, religious (...)
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  32.  28
    Florence Burgat (2004). Non-Violence Towards Animals in the Thinking of Gandhi: The Problem of Animal Husbandry. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 17 (3):223-248.
    The question of the imperatives induced by the Gandhian concept of non-violence towards animals is an issue that has been neglected by specialists on the thinking of the Mahatma. The aim of this article is to highlight the systematic – and significant – character of this particular aspect of his views on non-violence. The first part introduces the theoretical foundations of the duty of non-violence towards animals in general. Gandhi's critical interpretation of cow-protection, advocated by Hinduism, leads (...)
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  33.  7
    Robert Bernasconi (2015). “The Misinterpretation of Violence”: Heidegger’s Reading of Hegel and Schmitt on Gewalt. Research in Phenomenology 45 (2):214-236.
    _ Source: _Volume 45, Issue 2, pp 214 - 236 In the winter semester 1934–35 Heidegger used the occasion of an introductory seminar on Hegel’s Philosophy of Right as the context for a sustained confrontation with the legal theorist Carl Schmitt. In this paper, I establish the context for Heidegger’s confrontation with Schmitt from 1933 to early 1935; I explain why Heidegger chose Hegel as the context for his discussion; and above all, I demonstrate how their various attempts to make (...)
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  34.  7
    Michael Naas (2015). Violence and Historicity: Derrida’s Early Readings of Heidegger. Research in Phenomenology 45 (2):191-213.
    _ Source: _Volume 45, Issue 2, pp 191 - 213 With the recent publication of Jacques Derrida’s seminar of 1964–65, Heidegger: The Question of Being and History, it has become abundantly clear that when the full history of Derrida’s half-century-long engagement with Heidegger is finally written a special place will have to be reserved for the question of history itself, and especially the question of history or historicity in its irreducible relationship to language and to violence. In this essay, (...)
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  35.  88
    Zachary Davis (2009). A Phenomenology of Political Apathy: Scheler on the Origins of Mass Violence. [REVIEW] Continental Philosophy Review 42 (2):149-169.
    In his criticisms of the German youth movement and the emergence of fascism across Europe during the early 1920s, Max Scheler draws a distinction between the different senses of political apathy that give rise to mass political movements. Recent studies of mass apathy have tended to treat all forms of apathy as the same and as a consequence reduced the diverse expressions of mass violence to the same, stripping mass movements of any critical function. I show in this paper (...)
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  36. Beatrice Hanssen (2000). Critique of Violence: Between Poststructuralism and Critical Theory. Routledge.
    Critique of Violence is a highly original and lucid investigation of the heated controversy between poststructuralism and critical theory. Leading theorist Beatrice Hanssen uses Walter Benjamin's essay 'Critique of Violence' as a guide to analyse the contentious debate, shifting the emphasis from struggle to dialogue between the two parties. Regarding the questions of critique and violence as the major meeting points between both traditions, Hanssen positions herself between the two in an effort to investigate what critical theory (...)
     
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  37.  23
    Cecilia Menjívar (2009). Corporeal Dimensions of Gender Violence: Ladina's Self and Body in Eastern Guatemala. Studies in Social Justice 2 (1):12-26.
    Based on 30 in-depth interviews with Ladina women and field work conducted in a rural town in eastern Guatemala, I examine the physical expressions that violence can take on the women's bodies, such as common physical ailments that result from emotional distress as well as sicknesses that are caused directly by the conditions in which they live. A central theme in the discussion is the embodiment of violence as it is expressed in the control of the women's body (...)
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  38.  73
    Howard Adelman (2009). Research on the Ethics of War in the Context of Violence in Gaza. Journal of Academic Ethics 7 (1-2):93-113.
    The paper first demonstrates the ability to provode objective data and analyses during war and then examines the need for such objective gathering of data and analysis in the context of mass violence and war, specifically in the 2009 Gaza War. That data and analysis is required to assess compliance with just war norms in assessing the conduct of the war, a framework quite distinct from human rights norms that can misapply and deform the application of norms such as (...)
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  39.  10
    Sylvia Burrow & Chris Bailey (2013). Sexual Autonomy and Violence Against Women. In Robert Scott Stewart (ed.), Talk About Sex: A Multidisciplinary Discussion. Cbu Press
    Our position is that the threat and experience of violence that sex workers face is a crucial issue to address and should be considered in debates concerning the legalization of prostitution because even in countries where prostitution is legalized, prostitutes continue to experience violence. Our focus is to show that violence is crucially important to address because both the experience and the fear of physical, sexual or psychological harm erodes women ’s capacity to choose and act autonomously. (...)
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  40.  7
    Maya Gupta (2008). Functional Links Between Intimate Partner Violence and Animal Abuse: Personality Features and Representations of Aggression. Society and Animals 16 (3):223-242.
    Acts of intimate partner violence and abuse of nonhuman animals are common, harmful, and co-occurring phenomena. The aim of the present study was to identify perpetrator subtypes based on variable paths hypothesized to influence physical violence toward both partners and nonhuman animals: callousness and instrumental representations of aggression and rejection-sensitivity and expressive representations of aggression. Strong associations emerged between callousness and instrumental representations and between rejection-sensitivity and expressive representations. For males, callousness directly predicted both IPV and animal abuse. (...)
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  41.  49
    Robert Keith Shaw (2010). The Violence in Learning. Analysis and Metaphysics 9:76-100.
    This paper argues that learning is inherently violent. It examines the way in which Heidegger uses – and refrains from using – the concept in his account of Dasein. Heidegger explicitly discussed “learning” in 1951 and he used of the word in several contexts. Although he confines his use of “learning” to the ontic side of the ontic-ontological divide, there are aspects of what he says that open the door to an ontological analogue of the ontic learning. In this discussion (...)
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  42.  20
    Shannon Drysdale Walsh (2009). Engendering Justice: Constructing Institutions to Address Violence Against Women. Studies in Social Justice 2 (1):48-66.
    This paper addresses how states improve their responsiveness to violence against women in developing countries with little political will and few resources to do so. One key to engendering justice and improving responsiveness is building specialized institutions within the state that facilitate the implementation of laws addressing violence against women. Why and how do states engage in institution-building to protect marginalized populations in these contexts? I propose that developing countries are more likely to create and maintain specialized institutions (...)
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  43.  47
    Thomas E. Hill (1997). A Kantian Perspective on Political Violence. Journal of Ethics 1 (2):105 - 140.
    Rejecting Kant''s absolute opposition to revolution, I propose a modified Kantian perspective for reflecting on political violence, drawing from Kant''s basic ideas but abandoning some dubious assumptions. Developing suggestions in earlier papers, the essay sketches a model for moral legislation that combines the core ideas of each of Kant''s formulas of the Categorical Imperative. Though only a framework for deliberation, not a complete decision procedure, this excludes extremist positions, prohibitive and permissive, about political violence. Despite Kant''s hopes, the (...)
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  44.  22
    Gitte Jantzen & Jans F. Jensen (1993). Powerplay — Power, Violence and Gender in Video Games. AI and Society 7 (4):368-385.
    Unlike the bulk of electronic media the computer game or video game is a distinctly gendered medium. All investigations confirm that we are dealing with a medium which almost exclusively appeals to and is used by, boys and young men. Therefore, the video games and computer games are very suited for investigating the form of entertainment, the pleasure, that appeals to men, i.e. the specific ‘masculine pleasure’.The paper deals with questions such as: What do computer games mean? What does (...) in computer games signify? Why do computer games, especially the violent ones, mean something special to a certain group of men? These questions are discussed from the perspective of semiotics, media and control studies.Finally, the paper discusses the connections between women and the male dominated video games, and attempts to explain why, nevertheless, some girls and women do play these games. (shrink)
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  45.  57
    Robert Audi (1997). Preventing Abortion as a Test Case for the Justifiability of Violence. Journal of Ethics 1 (2):141-163.
    This paper explores the rationale for violence and coercion aimed at preventing abortion conceived as the killing of an innocent person. Some important arguments for personhood at conception are examined, and in the light of the examination the paper considers whether they warrant concluding that a free and democratic society should pass laws recognizing personhood at conception. The wider concern is what principles such a society should use as a basis for legal coercion and what principles conscientious individuals should (...)
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  46.  19
    Anna Carastathis (2010). Fanon on Turtle Island: Revisiting the Question of Violence. In Elizabeth A. Hoppe & Tracey Nicholls (eds.), Fanon and the Decolonization of Philosophy. Lexington (Rowman & Littlefield) 77.
    In this chapter, I explore the role of violence in colonial rule and its role in decolonization struggle by posing the question, “what is alive in Fanon’s thought?” What can Fanon tell us about white settler state power and Fourth World decolonization struggles? I explore the relevance of Fanon’s account to the ongoing colonial situation on the northern part of Anówara Kawennote (Turtle Island), occupied by Canada. In this analysis, I am informed by Kanien’kehaka (Mohawk) political philosopher Taiaiake Alfred. (...)
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  47.  17
    Petar Bojanic (2006). Last War or a War to Make the World Safe for Democracy: Violence and Right in Hannah Arendt. Filozofija I Društvo 31:79-95.
    Paraphrased within the title of this text is a note Hannah Arendt made in August 1952. After reading Carl Schmitt’s Nomos der Erde, Arendt tries to confront Schmitt’s idea of a just war. In the text I attempt to reconstruct Arendt’s readings of differing political philosophy texts within the context of her thinking concerning the relationship between violence and power, force and law. Arendt’s refusal to accept the existence of violence which can "conquer" freedom and "create" right and (...)
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  48.  1
    Eddie Hartmann (2016). Symbolic Boundaries and Collective Violence. A New Theoretical Argument for an Explanatory Sociology of Collective Violent Action. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 46 (2):165-186.
    The sociology of violence still struggles with two critical questions: What motivates people to act violently on behalf of groups and how do they come to identify with the groups for which they act? Methodologically the article addresses these puzzling problems in favor of a relational sociology that argues against both micro- and macro-reductionist accounts, while theoretically it proposes a twofold reorientation: first, it makes a plea for the so called cognitive turn in social theory; second, it proposes following (...)
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  49.  15
    Judith A. Easton & Todd K. Shackelford (2009). Morbid Jealousy and Sex Differences in Partner-Directed Violence. Human Nature 20 (3):342-350.
    Previous research suggests that individuals diagnosed with morbid jealousy have jealousy mechanisms that are activated at lower thresholds than individuals with normal jealousy, but that these mechanisms produce behavior that is similar to individuals with normal jealousy. We extended previous research documenting these similarities by investigating sex differences in partner-directed violence committed by individuals diagnosed with morbid jealousy. The results support some of our predictions. For example, a greater percentage of men than women diagnosed with morbid jealousy used physical (...)
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    Tobias Roehl & Herbert Kalthoff (2013). Remarks on Violence and Intersubjectivity. Human Studies 36 (1):111-119.
    The article connects a sociological perspective on violence to the problem of intersubjectivity. After an overview of sociological and cultural accounts of violence, we turn to a fundamental problem caused by the experience of violence. In dialogue with Frances Chaput Wakslers book on The New Orleans Sniper (2010) we discuss a case in which the problem of intersubjectivity figures prominently. The erratic nature of violent acts committed by an unseen sniper is experienced as existential crisis in which (...)
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