Search results for 'Virtual' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Eric Steinhart (1997). Leibniz's Palace of the Fates: A 17th Century Virtual Reality System. Presence: Teleoperators and Virtual Environments 6 (1):133-135.score: 27.0
    One way to think logically about virtual reality systems is to think of them as interactive depictions of possible worlds. Leibniz's "Palace of the Fates" is probably the earliest description of an interactive virtual reality system. Leibniz describes a system for the simulation of possible worlds by a human user in the actual world. He describes a user-interface for interacting multiple possible worlds and their histories.
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  2. Jessica Wolfendale (2007). My Avatar, My Self: Virtual Harm and Attachment. [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 9 (2):111-119.score: 24.0
    Multi-user online environments involve millions of participants world-wide. In these online communities participants can use their online personas – avatars – to chat, fight, make friends, have sex, kill monsters and even get married. Unfortunately participants can also use their avatars to stalk, kill, sexually assault, steal from and torture each other. Despite attempts to minimise the likelihood of interpersonal virtual harm, programmers cannot remove all possibility of online deviant behaviour. Participants are often greatly distressed when their avatars are (...)
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  3. Morgan Luck (2009). The Gamer's Dilemma: An Analysis of the Arguments for the Moral Distinction Between Virtual Murder and Virtual Paedophilia. [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 11 (1):31-36.score: 24.0
    Most people agree that murder is wrong. Yet, within computer games virtual murder scarcely raises an eyebrow. In one respect this is hardly surprising, as no one is actually murdered within a computer game. A virtual murder, some might argue, is no more unethical than taking a pawn in a game of chess. However, if no actual children are abused in acts of virtual paedophilia (life-like simulations of the actual practice), does that mean we should disregard these (...)
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  4. Aaron Sloman, Virtual Machine Functionalism: The Only Form of Functionalism Worth Taking Seriously in Philosophy of Mind.score: 24.0
    Most philosophers appear to have ignored the distinction between the broad concept of Virtual Machine Functionalism (VMF) described in Sloman&Chrisley (2003) and the better known version of functionalism referred to there as Atomic State Functionalism (ASF), which is often given as an explanation of what Functionalism is, e.g. in Block (1995). -/- One of the main differences is that ASF encourages talk of supervenience of states and properties, whereas VMF requires supervenience of machines that are arbitrarily complex networks of (...)
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  5. Michael J. Jacobson, Charlotte Taylor, Anne Newstead, Wai Yat Wong, Deborah Richards, Meredith Taylor, Porte John, Kartiko Iwan, Kapur Manu & Hu Chun (2011). Collaborative Virtual Worlds and Productive Failure. In Proceedings of the CSCL (Computer Supported Cognition and Learning) III. University of Hong Kong.score: 24.0
    This paper reports on an ongoing ARC Discovery Project that is conducting design research into learning in collaborative virtual worlds (CVW).The paper will describe three design components of the project: (a) pedagogical design, (b)technical and graphics design, and (c) learning research design. The perspectives of each design team will be discussed and how the three teams worked together to produce the CVW. The development of productive failure learning activities for the CVW will be discussed and there will be an (...)
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  6. Antti Revonsuo (1995). Consciousness, Dreams and Virtual Realities. Philosophical Psychology 8 (1):35-58.score: 24.0
    In this paper I develop the thesis that dreams are essential to an understanding of waking consciousness. In the first part I argue in opposition to the philosophers Malcolm and Dennett that empirical evidence now shows dreams to be real conscious experiences. In the second part, three questions concerning consciousness research are addressed. (1) How do we isolate the system to be explained (consciousness) from other systems? (2) How do we describe the system thus isolated? (3) How do we reveal (...)
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  7. Stevan Harnad (1992). Virtual Symposium on Virtual Mind. Minds and Machines 2 (3):217-238.score: 24.0
    When certain formal symbol systems (e.g., computer programs) are implemented as dynamic physical symbol systems (e.g., when they are run on a computer) their activity can be interpreted at higher levels (e.g., binary code can be interpreted as LISP, LISP code can be interpreted as English, and English can be interpreted as a meaninguful conversation). These higher levels of interpretability are called ‘virtual’ systems. If such a virtual system is interpretable as if it had a mind, is such (...)
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  8. Barbro Fröding & Martin Peterson (2012). Why Virtual Friendship is No Genuine Friendship. Ethics and Information Technology 14 (3):201-207.score: 24.0
    Based on a modern reading of Aristotle’s theory of friendship, we argue that virtual friendship does not qualify as genuine friendship. By ‘virtual friendship’ we mean the type of friendship that exists on the internet, and seldom or never is combined with real life interaction. A ‘traditional friendship’ is, in contrast, the type of friendship that involves substantial real life interaction, and we claim that only this type can merit the label ‘genuine friendship’ and thus qualify as morally (...)
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  9. Andreas Martin Lisewski (2006). The Concept of Strong and Weak Virtual Reality. Minds and Machines 16 (2):201-219.score: 24.0
    We approach the virtual reality phenomenon by studying its relationship to set theory. This approach offers a characterization of virtual reality in set theoretic terms, and we investigate the case where this is done using the wellfoundedness property. Our hypothesis is that non-wellfounded sets (so-called hypersets) give rise to a different quality of virtual reality than do familiar wellfounded sets. To elaborate this hypothesis, we describe virtual reality through Sommerhoff’s categories of first- and second-order self-awareness; introduced (...)
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  10. Shannon Densmore & Daniel C. Dennett (1999). The Virtues of Virtual Machines. Philosophy and Phenemenological Research 59 (3):747-61.score: 24.0
    Paul Churchland's book (hereafter ER)is an entertaining and instructive advertisement for a "neurocomputational" vision of how the brain (and mind) works. While we agree with its general thrust, and commend its lucid pedagogy on a host of difficult topics, we note that such pedagogy often exploits artificially heightened contrast, and sometimes the result is a misleading caricature instead of a helpful simplification. In particular, Churchland is eager to contrast the explanation of consciousness that can be accomplished by his "aspiring new (...)
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  11. Anders Eriksson & Kalle Grill, Who Owns My Avatar? -Rights in Virtual Property. Proceedings of DiGRA 2005 Conference: Changing Views – Worlds in Play.score: 24.0
    This paper presents a framework for discussing issues of ownership in connection to virtual worlds. We explore how divergent interests in virtual property can be mediated by applying a constructivist perspective to the concept ownership. The simple solutions offered today entail that a contract between the game producer and the gamer gives the game developer exclusive rights to all virtual property. This appears to be unsatisfactory. A number of legitimate interests on part of both producers and gamers (...)
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  12. Aaron Sloman & Ronald L. Chrisley (2003). Virtual Machines and Consciousness. Journal of Consciousness Studies 10 (4-5):133-172.score: 24.0
    Replication or even modelling of consciousness in machines requires some clarifications and refinements of our concept of consciousness. Design of, construction of, and interaction with artificial systems can itself assist in this conceptual development. We start with the tentative hypothesis that although the word “consciousness” has no well-defined meaning, it is used to refer to aspects of human and animal informationprocessing. We then argue that we can enhance our understanding of what these aspects might be by designing and building (...)-machine architectures capturing various features of consciousness. This activity may in turn nurture the development of our concepts of consciousness, showing how an analysis based on information-processing virtual machines answers old philosophical puzzles as well enriching empirical theories. This process of developing and testing ideas by developing and testing designs leads to gradual refinement of many of our pre-theoretical concepts of mind, showing how they can be construed as implicitly “architecture-based” concepts. Understanding how humanlike robots with appropriate architectures are likely to feel puzzled about qualia may help us resolve those puzzles. The concept of “qualia” turns out to be an “architecture-based” concept, while individual qualia concepts are “architecture-driven”. (shrink)
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  13. Paul J. Ford (2001). A Further Analysis of the Ethics of Representation in Virtual Reality: Multi-User Environments. [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 3 (2):113-121.score: 24.0
    This is a follow-up article toPhilip Brey's ``The ethics of representation andaction in Virtual Reality'' (published in thisjournal in January 1999). Brey's call for moreanalysis of ethical issues of virtual reality(VR) is continued by further analyzing issuesin a specialized domain of VR – namelymulti-user environments. Several elements ofBrey's article are critiqued in order to givemore context and a framework for discussion.Issues surrounding representations ofcharacters in multi-user virtual realities aresurveyed in order to focus attention on theimportance of additional (...)
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  14. Kyung-Man Kim (2011). Habermas on Understanding: Virtual Participation, Dialogue and the Universality of Truth. [REVIEW] Human Studies 34 (4):393-406.score: 24.0
    Although the success of Habermas’s theory of communicative action depends on his dialogical model of understanding in which a theorist is supposed to participate in the debate with the actors as a ‘virtual participant’ and seek context-transcendent truth through the exchange of speech acts, current literature on the theory of communicative action rarely touches on the difficulties it entails. In the first part of this paper, I will examine Habermas’s argument that understanding other cultural practices requires the interpreter to (...)
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  15. Tobias Fox (2008). Haunted by the Spectre of Virtual Particles: A Philosophical Reconsideration. [REVIEW] Journal for General Philosophy of Science 39 (1):35 - 51.score: 24.0
    A virtual particle is an elementary particle in a quantum field theory that serves to symbolise the interaction of its counterparts, the so called real particles. In the last 20 years, philosophers of physics have put forth several arguments for and against an interpretation of virtual particles as being like ordinary objects in space and time. In this article, I will attempt to systematise the major arguments and argue that no pro-argument is ultimately satisfactory, and that only one (...)
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  16. Robert Francis John Seddon (2013). Getting 'Virtual' Wrongs Right. Ethics and Information Technology 15 (1):1-11.score: 24.0
    Whilst some philosophical progress has been made on the ethical evaluation of playing video games, the exact subject matter of this enquiry remains surprisingly opaque. ‘Virtual murder’, simulation, representation and more are found in a literature yet to settle into a tested and cohesive terminology. Querying the language of the virtual in particular, I suggest that it is at once inexplicit and laden with presuppositions potentially liable to hinder anyone aiming to construct general philosophical claims about an ethics (...)
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  17. Deborah Richards, Jacobson Michael, Taylor Charlotte, Taylor Meredith, Porte John, Newstead Anne & Hanna Nader, Evaluating the Models and Behaviour of 3D Intelligent Virtual Animals in a Predator-Prey Relationship. AAMAS 2012: 79-86. Proceedings of the Eleventh International Conference on Agent and Multiagent Systems (AAMAS).score: 24.0
    This paper presents the intelligent virtual animals that inhabit Omosa, a virtual learning environment to help secondary school students learn how to conduct scientific inquiry and gain concepts from biology. Omosa supports multiple agents, including animals, plants, and human hunters, which live in groups of varying sizes and in a predator-prey relationship with other agent types (species). In this paper we present our generic agent architecture and the algorithms that drive all animals. We concentrate on two of our (...)
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  18. Jeff Dunn (2012). Virtual Worlds and Moral Evaluation. Ethics and Information Technology 14 (4):255-265.score: 24.0
    Consider the multi-user virtual worlds of online games such as EVE and World of Warcraft, or the multi-user virtual world of Second Life. Suppose a player performs an action in one of these worlds, via his or her virtual character, which would be wrong, if the virtual world were real. What is the moral status of this virtual action? In this paper I consider arguments for and against the Asymmetry Thesis: the thesis that such (...) actions are never wrong. I also explain how the truth of the Asymmetry Thesis is closely aligned with the possibility of what Edward Castronova has called closed synthetic worlds. With some qualifications, the ultimate conclusion is that the Asymmetry Thesis is false and that these closed worlds are impossible. (shrink)
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  19. Maria Bakardjieva & Andrew Feenberg (2001). Involving the Virtual Subject. Ethics and Information Technology 2 (4):233-240.score: 24.0
    As users of computer networks have become more active in producing their own electronic records, in the form of transcripts of onlinediscussions, ethicists have attempted to interpret this new situation interms of earlier models of personal data protection. But thistransference results in unprecedented problems for researchers. Thispaper examines some of the central dichotomies and paradoxes in thedebate on research ethics online in the context of the concrete study ofa virtual community that we carried out. We argue that alienation, notprivacy, (...)
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  20. Benjamin Woolley (1992). Virtual Worlds: A Journey in Hype and Hyperreality. Blackwell.score: 24.0
    In Virtual Worlds, Benjamin Woolley examines the reality of virtual reality.
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  21. Günter Nimtz (2009). On Virtual Phonons, Photons, and Electrons. Foundations of Physics 39 (12):1346-1355.score: 24.0
    A macroscopic realization of the peculiar virtual particles is presented. The classical Helmholtz and the Schrödinger equations are differential equations of the same mathematical structure. The solutions with an imaginary wave number are called evanescent modes in the case of elastic and electromagnetic fields. In the case of non-relativistic quantum mechanical fields they are called tunneling solutions. The imaginary wave numbers point to strange consequences: The waves are non-local, they are not observable, and they are described as virtual (...)
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  22. Nicholas John Munn (2012). The Reality of Friendship Within Immersive Virtual Worlds. Ethics and Information Technology 14 (1):1-10.score: 24.0
    In this article I examine a recent development in online communication, the immersive virtual worlds of Massively Multiplayer Online Role-Playing Games (MMORPGs). I argue that these environments provide a distinct form of online experience from the experience available through earlier generation forms of online communication such as newsgroups, chat rooms, email and instant messaging. The experience available to participants in MMORPGs is founded on shared activity, while the experience of earlier generation online communication is largely if not wholly dependent (...)
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  23. Thomas M. Powers (2004). Real Wrongs in Virtual Communities. Ethics and Information Technology 5 (4):191-198.score: 24.0
    Beginning with the well-knowncyber-rape in LambdaMOO, I argue that it ispossible to have real moral wrongs in virtualcommunities. I then generalize the account toshow how it applies to interactions in gamingand discussion communities. My account issupported by a view of moral realism thatacknowledges entities like intentions andcausal properties of actions. Austin's speechact theory is used to show that real people canact in virtual communities in ways that bothestablish practices and moral expectations, andwarrant strong identifications betweenthemselves and their online identities. (...)
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  24. Brent Gregory, Sue Gregory, Bogdanovych A., Jacobson Michael, Newstead Anne & Simeon Simoff and Many Others (2011). How Are Australian Higher Education Institutions Contributing to Innovative Teaching and Learning Through Virtual Worlds? In Gregory Sue (ed.), Proceedings of Ascilite 2011 (Australian Society of Computers in Tertiary Education). Ascilite.score: 24.0
    Over the past decade, teaching and learning in virtual worlds has been at the forefront of many higher education institutions around the world. The DEHub Virtual Worlds Working Group (VWWG) consisting of Australian and New Zealand higher education academics was formed in 2009. These educators are investigating the role that virtual worlds play in the future of education and actively changing the direction of their own teaching practice and curricula. 47 academics reporting on 28 Australian higher education (...)
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  25. Andrey Kiselev, Benjamin Alexander Hacker, Thomas Wankerl, Niyaz Abdikeev & Toyoaki Nishida (2011). Toward Incorporating Emotions with Rationality Into a Communicative Virtual Agent. AI and Society 26 (3):275-289.score: 24.0
    This paper addresses the problem of human–computer interactions when the computer can interpret and express a kind of human-like behavior, offering natural communication. A conceptual framework for incorporating emotions with rationality is proposed. A model of affective social interactions is described. The model utilizes the SAIBA framework, which distinguishes among several stages of processing of information. The SAIBA framework is extended, and a model is realized in human behavior detection, human behavior interpretation, intention planning, attention tracking behavior planning, and behavior (...)
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  26. Bernard Haisch (2014). Is the Universe a Vast, Consciousness-Created Virtual Reality Simulation? Cosmos and History: The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 10 (1):48-60.score: 24.0
    Two luminaries of 20th century astrophysics were Sir James Jeans and Sir Arthur Eddington. Both took seriously the view that there is more to reality than the physical universe and more to consciousness than simply brain activity. In his Science and the Unseen World (1929) Eddington speculated about a spiritual world and that "conscious is not wholly, nor even primarily a device for receiving sense impressions." Jeans also speculated on the existence of a universal mind and a non-mechanical reality, writing (...)
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  27. Johnny Hartz Søraker (2012). Virtual Worlds and Their Challenge to Philosophy: Understanding the “Intravirtual” and the “Extravirtual”. Metaphilosophy 43 (4):499-512.score: 24.0
    The Web, in particular real-time interactions in three-dimensional virtual environments (virtual worlds), comes with a set of unique characteristics that leave our traditional frameworks inapplicable. The present article illustrates this by arguing that the notion of “technology relations,” as put forward by Ihde and Verbeek, becomes inapplicable when it comes to the Internet, and this inapplicability shows why these phenomena require new philosophical frameworks. Against this background, and more constructively, the article proposes a fundamental distinction between “intravirtual” and (...)
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  28. Johnny Hartz Søraker (2012). How Shall I Compare Thee? Comparing the Prudential Value of Actual Virtual Friendship. Ethics and Information Technology 14 (3):209-219.score: 24.0
    It has become commonplace to hold the view that virtual surrogates for the things that are good in life are inferior to their actual, authentic counterparts, including virtual education, virtual skill-demanding activities and virtual acts of creativity. Virtual friendship has also been argued to be inferior to traditional, embodied forms of friendship. Coupled with the view that virtual friendships threaten to replace actual ones, the conclusion is often made that we ought to concentrate our (...)
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  29. Jon Cogburn & Mark Silcox (forthcoming). Against Brain-in-a-Vatism: On the Value of Virtual Reality. Philosophy and Technology:1-19.score: 24.0
    The term “virtual reality” was first coined by Antonin Artaud to describe a value-adding characteristic of certain types of theatrical performances. The expression has more recently come to refer to a broad range of incipient digital technologies that many current philosophers regard as a serious threat to human autonomy and well-being. Their concerns, which are formulated most succinctly in “brain in a vat”-type thought experiments and in Robert Nozick's famous “experience machine” argument, reflect a fundamental misunderstanding of the way (...)
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  30. Pedro Lucas Dulci (2012). Quando a linguagem vira ruído: violência real em tempos de blá-blá-blá virtual. Revista Inquietude 3 (2):144-163.score: 24.0
    A modernidade política presenciou a modificação das suas práticas governamentais, através de uma crescente inserção da vida humana no centro da gestão pública. Tal virada biopolítica desencadeou uma série de novos processos e dinâmicas na sociedade que têm por objetivo principal a intervenção reguladora da vida. O presente texto ocupar-se-á em abordar um desencadeamento específico: a profusão de espaços de exceção virtuais nos quais impera a política do silêncio. Virtual será aqui entendido em seu sentido computacional, como aquela realidade (...)
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  31. William H. Overman & Allison Pierce (2013). Iowa Gambling Task with Non-Clinical Participants: Effects of Using Real + Virtual Cards and Additional Trials. Frontiers in Psychology 4:935.score: 24.0
    Performance on the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT) in clinical populations can be interpreted only in relation to established base line performance in normal populations. As in all comparisons of assessment tools, the normal base line must reflect performance under conditions in which subjects can function at their best levels. In this review, we show that a number of variables enhance IGT performance in non-clinical participants. First, optimal performance is produced by having participants turn over real cards while viewing virtual (...)
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  32. Roberto Diodato (2012). Aesthetics of the Virtual. State University of New York Press.score: 24.0
    Reconfigures classic aesthetic concepts in relation to the novelty introduced by virtual bodies.
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  33. Matteo Gaeta, Juergen Jaehnert, Kleopatra Konstanteli, Sergio Miranda, Pierluigi Ritrovato & Theodora Varvarigou (2009). Federated Identity Management in Mobile Dynamic Virtual Organizations. Identity in the Information Society 2 (2):115-136.score: 24.0
    Over the past few years, the Virtual Organization (VO) paradigm has been emerging as an ideal solution to support collaboration among globally distributed entities (individuals and/or organizations). However, due to rapid technological and societal changes, there has also been an astonishing growth in technologies and services for mobile users. This has opened up new collaborative scenarios where the same participant can access the VO from different locations and mobility becomes a key issue for users and services. The nomadicity and (...)
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  34. Ismo Kantola (2013). On the Re-Materialization of the Virtual. AI and Society 28 (2):189-198.score: 24.0
    The so-called new economy based on the global network of digitalized communication was welcomed as a platform of innovations and as a vehicle of advancement of democracy. The concept of virtuality captures the essence of the new economy: efficiency and free access. In practice, the new economy has developed into an heterogenic entity dominated by practices such as propagation of trust and commitment to standards and standard-like technological solutions; entrenchment of locally strategic subsystems; surveillance of unwanted behavior. Five empirical cases (...)
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  35. Thomas Baumgartner, Dominique Speck, Denise Wettstein, Ornella Masnari, Gian Beeli & Lutz Jäncke (2008). Feeling Present in Arousing Virtual Reality Worlds: Prefrontal Brain Regions Differentially Orchestrate Presence Experience in Adults and Children. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 2:8.score: 24.0
    Virtual reality (VR) is a powerful tool for simulating aspects of the real world. The success of VR is thought to depend on its ability to evoke a sense of "being there", that is, the feeling of "Presence". In view of the rapid progress in the development of increasingly more sophisticated virtual environments (VE), the importance of understanding the neural underpinnings of presence is growing. To date however, the neural correlates of this phenomenon have received very scant attention. (...)
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  36. Seemu Sharma, Hitashi Lomash & Seema Bawa (forthcoming). Who Regulates Ethics in the Virtual World? Science and Engineering Ethics:1-10.score: 24.0
    This paper attempts to give an insight into emerging ethical issues due to the increased usage of the Internet in our lives. We discuss three main theoretical approaches relating to the ethics involved in the information technology (IT) era: first, the use of IT as a tool; second, the use of social constructivist methods; and third, the approach of phenomenologists. Certain aspects of ethics and IT have been discussed based on a phenomenological approach and moral development. Further, ethical issues related (...)
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  37. Klaus Mainzer (1999). Computational Models and Virtual Reality. New Perspectives of Research in Chemistry. Hyle 5 (2):135 - 144.score: 24.0
    Molecular models are typical topics of chemical research depending on the technical standards of observation, computation, and representation. Mathematically, molecular structures have been represented by means of graph theory, topology, differential equations, and numerical procedures. With the increasing capabilities of computer networks, computational models and computer-assisted visualization become an essential part of chemical research. Object-oriented programming languages create a virtual reality of chemical structures opening new avenues of exploration and collaboration in chemistry. From an epistemic point of view, (...) reality is a new computer-assisted tool of human imagination and recognition. (shrink)
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  38. Daniel Memmi (2006). The Nature of Virtual Communities. AI and Society 20 (3):288-300.score: 24.0
    The impressive development of electronic communication techniques has given rise to virtual communities. The nature of these computer-mediated communities has been the subject of much recent debate. Are they ordinary social groups in electronic form, or are they fundamentally different from traditional communities? Understanding virtual communities seems a prerequisite for the design of better communication systems. To clarify this debate, we will resort to the classical sociological distinction between small traditional communities (based on personal relations) and modern social (...)
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  39. Mel Slater, Daniel Perez-Marcos, H. Henrik Ehrsson & Maria V. Sanchez-Vives (2008). Towards a Digital Body: The Virtual Arm Illusion. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 2:6.score: 24.0
    The integration of the human brain with computers is an interesting new area of applied neuroscience, where one application is replacement of a person’s real body by a virtual representation. Here we demonstrate that a virtual limb can be made to feel part of your body if appropriate multisensory correlations are provided. We report an illusion that is invoked through tactile stimulation on a person’s hidden real right hand with synchronous virtual visual stimulation on an aligned 3D (...)
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  40. Lauge Baungaard Rasmussen & Arne Wangel (2007). Work in the Virtual Enterprise—Creating Identities, Building Trust, and Sharing Knowledge. AI and Society 21 (1-2):184-199.score: 24.0
    The emergence of the virtual network enterprise represents a dynamic response to the crisis of the vertical bureaucracy type of business organisation. However, its key performance criteria—interconnectedness and consistency—pose tremendous challenges as the completion of the distributed tasks of the network must be integrated across the barriers of missing face-to-face clues and cultural differences. The social integration of the virtual network involves the creation of identities of the participating nodes, the building of trust between them, and the sharing (...)
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  41. Violina Ratcheva & Shailendra Vyakarnam (2001). The Challenges of Virtual Partnerships: Critical Success Factors in the Formation of Inter-Organisational Teams. [REVIEW] AI and Society 15 (1-2):99-116.score: 24.0
    Virtual teams formed across organisational boundaries and organised around an opportunity are a relatively new area of research. A review of previous research shows that, although virtual teams have been well defined as a concept, only a few studies have contributed to the understanding of the processes of assembling and maintaining effective inter-organisational teams enabled by new modes of communication. By combining cross-disciplinary theoretical approaches, the reported study presents a conceptual overview for collective teaming in virtual settings. (...)
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  42. Litska Strikwerda (forthcoming). Present and Future Instances of Virtual Rape in Light of Three Categories of Legal Philosophical Theories on Rape. Philosophy and Technology:1-20.score: 24.0
    This paper is about the question of whether or not virtual rape should be considered a crime under current law. A virtual rape is the rape of an avatar (a person’s virtual representation) in a virtual world. In the future, possibilities for virtual rape of a person him- or herself will arise in virtual reality environments involving a haptic device or robotics. As the title indicates, I will study both these present and future instances (...)
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  43. Martín F. Echavarría (2013). La cantidad virtual (quantitas virtualis) según Tomás de Aquino. Logos. Anales Del Seminario de Metafísica 46:235-259.score: 24.0
    Tomás de Aquino distingue la cantidad como predicamento ( quantitas dimensiva ) de la medida de perfección de una cosa, su cantidad virtual ( quantitas virutalis or virtutis ). El Aquinate diferencia la cantidad virtual de la esencia, del ser y de la operación. El concepto de cantidad virtual juega un rol central en la metafísica de la participación, pues participar es como tomar una “parte” de un todo, y tal parte representa un determinado monto de perfección. (...)
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  44. Bernhard Hommel Ke Ma (2013). The Virtual-Hand Illusion: Effects of Impact and Threat on Perceived Ownership and Affective Resonance. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 24.0
    The rubber hand illusion refers to the observation that participants perceive “body ownership” for a rubber hand if it moves, or is stroked in synchrony with the participant’s real (covered) hand. Research indicates that events targeting artificial body parts can trigger affective responses (affective resonance) only with perceived body ownership, while neuroscientific findings suggest affective resonance irrespective of ownership (e.g., when observing other individuals under threat). We hypothesized that this may depend on the severity of the event. We first replicated (...)
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  45. Matteo Martini, Daniel Pérez Marcos & Maria V. Sanchez-Vives (2013). What Color is My Arm? Changes in Skin Color of an Embodied Virtual Arm Modulates Pain Threshold. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 24.0
    It has been demonstrated that visual inputs can modulate pain. However, the influence of skin colour on pain perception is unknown. Red skin is associated to inflamed, hot and more sensitive skin while blue is associated to cold. We aimed to test whether the colour of the skin would alter the heat pain threshold. To this end, we used an immersive virtual environment where we induced embodiment of a virtual arm that was co-located with the real one and (...)
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  46. Alexander Toet & Martin van Schaik (2013). Visual Attention for a Desktop Virtual Environment with Ambient Scent. Frontiers in Psychology 4:883.score: 24.0
    In the current study participants explored a desktop virtual environment (VE) representing a suburban neighborhood with signs of public disorder (neglect, vandalism and crime), while being exposed to either room air (control group), or subliminal levels of tar (unpleasant; typically associated with burned or waste material) or freshly cut grass (pleasant; typically associated with natural or fresh material) ambient odor. They reported all signs of disorder they noticed during their walk together with their associated emotional response. Based on recent (...)
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  47. Marcus Cheetham, Andreas Pedroni, Angus Antley, Mel Slater & Lutz Jäncke (2009). Virtual Milgram: Empathic Concern or Personal Distress? Evidence From Functional MRI and Dispositional Measures. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 3.score: 24.0
    One motive for behaving as the agent of another’s aggression appears to be anchored in as yet unelucidated mechanisms of obedience to authority. In a recent partial replication of Milgram’s obedience paradigm within an immersive virtual environment, participants administered pain to a female virtual human and observed her suffering. Whether the participants’ response to the latter was more akin to other-oriented empathic concern for her well-being or to a self-oriented aversive state of personal distress in response to her (...)
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  48. Ausias Pomes & Mel Slater (2013). Drift and Ownership Towards a Distant Virtual Body. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7:908.score: 24.0
    In body ownership illusions participants feel that a mannequin or virtual body (VB) is their own. Earlier results suggest that body ownership over a body seen from behind in extra-personal space is possible when the surrogate body is visually stroked and tapped on its back, while spatially and temporal synchronous tactile stimulation is applied to the participant’s back. This result has been disputed with the claim that the results can be explained by self-recognition rather than somatic body ownership. We (...)
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  49. Dik Roth & Jeroen Warner (2008). Virtual Water: Virtuous Impact? The Unsteady State of Virtual Water. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 25 (2):257-270.score: 24.0
    Virtual water,” water needed for crop production, is now being mainstreamed in the water policy world. Relying on virtual water in the form of food imports is increasingly recommended as good policy for water-scarce areas. Virtual water globalizes discussions on water scarcity, ecological sustainability, food security and consumption. Presently the concept is creating much noise in the water and food policy world, which contributes to its politicization. We will argue that the virtual water debate is also (...)
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  50. Matthew Ventura, Valerie Shute, Timothy Joseph Wright & Weinan Zhao (2013). An Investigation of the Validity of the Virtual Spatial Navigation Assessment. Frontiers in Psychology 4:852.score: 24.0
    This correlational study investigated a new measure of environmental spatial ability (i.e., large scale spatial ability) called the Virtual Spatial Navigation Assessment (VSNA). In the VSNA, participants must find a set of gems in a virtual 3D environment using a first person avatar on a computer. The VSNA runs in a web browser and automatically collects the time taken to find each gem. The time taken to collect gems in the VSNA was significantly correlated to three oth-er spatial (...)
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