Search results for 'Visualization' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Valeria Giardino (2010). Intuition and Visualization in Mathematical Problem Solving. Topoi 29 (1):29-39.score: 18.0
    In this article, I will discuss the relationship between mathematical intuition and mathematical visualization. I will argue that in order to investigate this relationship, it is necessary to consider mathematical activity as a complex phenomenon, which involves many different cognitive resources. I will focus on two kinds of danger in recurring to visualization and I will show that they are not a good reason to conclude that visualization is not reliable, if we consider its use in mathematical (...)
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  2. Peter Langland-Hassan (2011). A Puzzle About Visualization. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 10 (2):145-173.score: 18.0
    Visual imagination (or visualization) is peculiar in being both free, in that what we imagine is up to us, and useful to a wide variety of practical reasoning tasks. How can we rely upon our visualizations in practical reasoning if what we imagine is subject to our whims? The key to answering this puzzle, I argue, is to provide an account of what constrains the sequence in which the representations featured in visualization unfold—an account that is consistent with (...)
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  3. R. Arp (2006). The Environments of Our Hominin Ancestors, Tool-Usage, and Scenario Visualization. Biology and Philosophy 21 (1):95-117.score: 18.0
    In this paper, I give an account of how our hominin ancestors evolved a conscious ability I call scenario visualization that enabled them to manufacture novel tools so as to survive and flourish in the ever-changing and complex environments in which they lived. I first present the ideas and arguments put forward by evolutionary psychologists that the mind evolved certain mental capacities as adaptive responses to environmental pressures. Specifically, Steven Mithen thinks that the mind has evolved cognitive fluidity, viz., (...)
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  4. Francis T. Marchese (2013). Periodicity, Visualization, and Design. Foundations of Chemistry 15 (1):31-55.score: 18.0
    This paper explores the development of the chemical table as a tool designed for chemical information visualization. It uses a historical context to investigate the purpose of chemical tables and charts, analyzing them from the perspective of theory of tables, cartography, and design. It suggests reasons why the two-dimensional periodic table remains the de facto standard for chemical information display.
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  5. David Kirsh (2003). Quantifying the Relative Roles of Shadows, Steropsis, and Aocal Accomodation in 3D Visualization. The 3rd IASTED International Conference on Visualization, Imaging, and Image Processing.score: 15.0
    The goal of three-dimensional visualization is to present information in such a way that the viewer suspends disbelief and uses the screen imagery the same way as he or she would use an identical, real 3D scene. To do this effectively, programmers employ a variety of 3D depth cues. Our own anecdotal experience says that shadows and stereopsis are two of the best for visualization. The nice thing is that both of these are possible to do in interactive (...)
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  6. Kirill V. Istomin, Jaroslava Panáková & Patrick Heady (2014). Culture, Perception, and Artistic Visualization: A Comparative Study of Children's Drawings in Three Siberian Cultural Groups. Cognitive Science 38 (1):76-100.score: 15.0
    In a study of three indigenous and non-indigenous cultural groups in northwestern and northeastern Siberia, framed line tests and a landscape drawing task were used to examine the hypotheses that test-based assessments of context sensitivity and independence are correlated with the amount of contextual information contained in drawings, and with the order in which the focal and background objects are drawn. The results supported these hypotheses, and inspection of the regression relationships suggested that the intergroup variations in test performance were (...)
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  7. Maria Kozhevnikov, Michael A. Motes & Mary Hegarty (2007). Spatial Visualization in Physics Problem Solving. Cognitive Science 31 (4):549-579.score: 15.0
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  8. Christopher F. Chabris & Eliot S. Hearst (2003). Visualization, Pattern Recognition, and Forward Search: Effects of Playing Speed and Sight of the Position on Grandmaster Chess Errors. Cognitive Science 27 (4):637-648.score: 15.0
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  9. Min Chen & Luciano Floridi (2013). An Analysis of Information Visualisation. Synthese 190 (16):3421-3438.score: 13.0
    Philosophers have relied on visual metaphors to analyse ideas and explain their theories at least since Plato. Descartes is famous for his system of axes, and Wittgenstein for his first design of truth table diagrams. Today, visualisation is a form of ‘computer-aided seeing’ information in data. Hence, information is the fundamental ‘currency’ exchanged through a visualisation pipeline. In this article, we examine the types of information that may occur at different stages of a general visualization pipeline. We do so (...)
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  10. Robert Arp (2005). Scenario Visualization: One Explanation of Creative Problem Solving. Journal of Consciousness Studies 12 (3):31-60.score: 12.0
    In this paper, I first present the ideas and arguments put forward by evolutionary psychologists that humans evolved certain capacities to creatively problem solve. Specifically, Steven Mithen thinks that creative problem solving is possible because the mind has evolved a conscious capacity he calls cognitive fluidity, the flexible exchange of information between and among mental modules. While I agree with Mithen that cognitive fluidity acts as a necessary condition for creative problem solving, I disagree that cognitive fluidity alone will suffice (...)
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  11. Carole J. Clem & Jean Paul Rigaut (1995). Computer Simulation Modelling and Visualization of 3d Architecture of Biological Tissues. Acta Biotheoretica 43 (4).score: 12.0
    Recent technical improvements, such as 3D microscopy imaging, have shown the necessity of studying 3D biological tissue architecture during carcinogenesis. In the present paper a computer simulation model is developed allowing the visualization of the microscopic biological tissue architecture during the development of metaplastic and dysplastic lesions.The static part of the model allows the simulation of the normal, metaplastic and dysplastic architecture of an external epithelium. This model is associated to a knowledge base which contains only data on the (...)
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  12. Michael Hoffmann & Jason Borenstein (2013). Understanding Ill-Structured Engineering Ethics Problems Through a Collaborative Learning and Argument Visualization Approach. Science and Engineering Ethics 20 (1):1-16.score: 12.0
    As a committee of the National Academy of Engineering recognized, ethics education should foster the ability of students to analyze complex decision situations and ill-structured problems. Building on the NAE’s insights, we report about an innovative teaching approach that has two main features: first, it places the emphasis on deliberation and on self-directed, problem-based learning in small groups of students; and second, it focuses on understanding ill-structured problems. The first innovation is motivated by an abundance of scholarly research that supports (...)
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  13. Walter Carnielli (2004). Book Reviews: Claude P. Bruter (Editor), Mathematics in Art: Mathematical Visualization in Art and Education. Logic and Logical Philosophy 13:163-166.score: 12.0
    Claude P. Bruter (editor), Mathematics in Art: Mathematical Visualization inArt and Education, Springer Verlag, New York, 2002, pp. X + 337, ISBN 3-540-43422-4.
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  14. Jordi Honey-Rosés, Marc Le Menestrel, Daniel Arenas, Felix Rauschmayer & Julian Rode (2013). Enriching Intergenerational Decision-Making with Guided Visualization Exercises. Journal of Business Ethics:1-6.score: 12.0
    Seriously engaging with the needs, hardships, and aspirations of future generations is an emotional experience as much as an intellectual endeavor. In this essay we describe a guided visualization exercise used to overcome the emotional barriers that often prevent us from dealing effectively with intergenerational decisions. The meditation and dreaming technique was applied to a diverse group of researchers who engaged in a visualized encounter with future generations. Following the exercise, we concluded that a serious analysis of intergenerational conflict (...)
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  15. Leon Horsten & Irina Starikova (2010). Mathematical Knowledge: Intuition, Visualization, and Understanding. Topoi 29 (1):1-2.score: 9.0
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  16. J. Gregory Trafton, Susan B. Trickett & Farilee E. Mintz (2005). Connecting Internal and External Representations: Spatial Transformations of Scientific Visualizations. [REVIEW] Foundations of Science 10 (1):89-106.score: 9.0
    Many scientific discoveries have depended on external diagrams or visualizations. Many scientists also report to use an internal mental representation or mental imagery to help them solve problems and reason. How do scientists connect these internal and external representations? We examined working scientists as they worked on external scientific visualizations. We coded the number and type of spatial transformations (mental operations that scientists used on internal or external representations or images) and found that there were a very large number of (...)
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  17. Jamie Tappenden, Proof Style and Understanding in Mathematics I: Visualization, Unification and Axiom Choice.score: 9.0
    Mathematical investigation, when done well, can confer understanding. This bare observation shouldn’t be controversial; where obstacles appear is rather in the effort to engage this observation with epistemology. The complexity of the issue of course precludes addressing it tout court in one paper, and I’ll just be laying some early foundations here. To this end I’ll narrow the field in two ways. First, I’ll address a specific account of explanation and understanding that applies naturally to mathematical reasoning: the view proposed (...)
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  18. Steven M. Rosen (1974). A Case of Non-Euclidean Visualization. Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 5 (1):33-39.score: 9.0
  19. Douglas Walton (2012). Building a System for Finding Objections to an Argument. Argumentation 26 (3):369-391.score: 9.0
    Abstract This paper addresses the role that argumentation schemes and argument visualization software tools can play in helping to find and counter objections to a given argument one is confronted with. Based on extensive analysis of features of the argumentation in these two examples, a practical four-step method of finding objections to an argument is set out. The study also applies the Carneades Argumentation System to the task of finding objections to an argument, and shows how this system has (...)
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  20. Michelle G. Gibbons (2012). Reassessing Discovery: Rosalind Franklin, Scientific Visualization, and the Structure of DNA. Philosophy of Science 79 (1):63-80.score: 9.0
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  21. Jörg R. J. Schirra (1993). A Contribution to Reference Semantics of Spatial Prepositions: The Visualization Problem and its Solution in Vitra. In Cornelia Zelinsky-Wibbelt (ed.), [Book Chapter]. Mouton de Gruyter.score: 9.0
    The cognitive function of mental images with respect to the referential aspect of language is examined and used in the listener model ANTLIMA of the natural language system SOCCER. An operational realization of the reference relation used to recognize instances of spatial concepts in the results of a vision system and also to visualize locative expressions is presented and compared to A. Herskovits' analysis of the semantics of spatial prepositions.
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  22. Jean Paul Van Bendegem (2006). Review of P. Mancosu, K. F. Jørgensen, and S. A. Pedersen (Eds.), Visualization, Explanation and Reasoning Styles in Mathematics. [REVIEW] Philosophia Mathematica 14 (3):378-391.score: 9.0
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  23. Beaumont Newhall (1944). Photography and the Development of Kinetic Visualization. Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 7:40-45.score: 9.0
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  24. Agustin A. Araya (2003). The Hidden Side of Visualization. Techné 7 (2):74-119.score: 9.0
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  25. Graeme P. Earl (2009). Rome (L.) Haselberger, (J.) Humphrey (Edd.) Imaging Ancient Rome. Documentation – Visualization – Imagination. Proceedings of the Third Williams Symposium on Classical Architecture, 2004. (JRA Supplementary Series 61.) Pp. 337, B/W & Colour Ills, B/W & Colour Maps. Portsmouth, Rhode Island: Journal of Roman Archaeology, 2006. Cased, US$125. ISBN: 978-1-887829-61-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 59 (01):255-.score: 9.0
  26. Thomas F. Gordon & Douglas Walton (2012). A Carneades Reconstruction of Popov V Hayashi. Artificial Intelligence and Law 20 (1):37-56.score: 9.0
    Carneades is an open source argument mapping application and a programming library for building argumentation support tools. In this paper, Carneades’ support for argument reconstruction, evaluation and visualization is illustrated by modeling most of the factual and legal arguments in Popov v Hayashi.
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  27. Patrick Maynard (1997). The Engine of Visualization: Thinking Through Photography. Cornell University Press.score: 9.0
    First ever philosophy treatise on photography, analytic in approach but sensitive to photo-history, not confined to aesthetics or art (illus.), Walker Evans photo on cover. Papercover printing, Dec. 2000.
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  28. James Franklin (2000). Diagrammatic Reasoning and Modelling in the Imagination: The Secret Weapons of the Scientific Revolution. In Guy Freeland & Anthony Corones (eds.), 1543 and All That: Image and Word, Change and Continuity in the Proto-Scientific Revolution. Kluwer.score: 9.0
    Just before the Scientific Revolution, there was a "Mathematical Revolution", heavily based on geometrical and machine diagrams. The "faculty of imagination" (now called scientific visualization) was developed to allow 3D understanding of planetary motion, human anatomy and the workings of machines. 1543 saw the publication of the heavily geometrical work of Copernicus and Vesalius, as well as the first Italian translation of Euclid.
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  29. Dirk L. Couprie (1995). The Visualization Of Anaximander's Astronomy. Apeiron 28 (3):159 - 181.score: 9.0
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  30. Klaus Mainzer (1999). Computational Models and Virtual Reality. New Perspectives of Research in Chemistry. Hyle 5 (2):135 - 144.score: 9.0
    Molecular models are typical topics of chemical research depending on the technical standards of observation, computation, and representation. Mathematically, molecular structures have been represented by means of graph theory, topology, differential equations, and numerical procedures. With the increasing capabilities of computer networks, computational models and computer-assisted visualization become an essential part of chemical research. Object-oriented programming languages create a virtual reality of chemical structures opening new avenues of exploration and collaboration in chemistry. From an epistemic point of view, virtual (...)
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  31. Ruth McNally & M. Lynch (2005). Chains of Custody: Visualization, Representation and Accountability in the Processing of Forensic DNA Evidence. Communication and Cognition 38 (3-4).score: 9.0
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  32. Joachim Schummer, Aesthetics and Visualization in Chemistry, Part.score: 9.0
    There is a particular irony that chemistry – the most visual, tactile, and pungent of sciences – is rarely associated with modern notions of aesthetics and science. Indeed, as any examination of aesthetics and modern science reveals, physics, rather than chemistry or biology, is considered the paradigm because of its extraordinary ability to comprehend and communicate through the symbolic language of mathematics. Echoing Heisenberg’s 1970 essay, "The Meaning of Beauty in the Exact Sciences", this perspective on physics takes the inherent (...)
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  33. Douglas Walton, Visualization Tools, Argumentation Schemes and Expert Opinion Evidence in Law.score: 9.0
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  34. David Campbell (2009). “Black Skin and Blood”: Documentary Photography and Santu Mofokeng's Critique of the Visualization of Apartheid South Africa. History and Theory 48 (4):52-58.score: 9.0
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  35. Daniel W. Conway (forthcoming). “Seeing” is Believing: Narrative Visualization in Kierkegaard's Fear and Trembling. Journal of Textual Reasoning.score: 9.0
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  36. Ian M. L. Hunter (1979). Mental Visualization in Nonlaboratory Situations. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (4):556-557.score: 9.0
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  37. Sthaneshwar Timalsina (2005). Meditating Mantras: Meaning and Visualization in Tantric Literature. In Gerald James Larson & Knut A. Jacobsen (eds.), Theory and Practice of Yoga: Essays in Honour of Gerald James Larson. Brill. 110--213.score: 9.0
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  38. Bert van Roermund (forthcoming). Following Legal Rules: Visibility and Feasibility. International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique:1-10.score: 9.0
    This paper reflects on the idea of ‘visualization’ of legal rules as part of an account of rule following in action. Presenting an alternative to Van Schooten’s (Jurisprudence and communication. Deborah Charles, Liverpool, 2012) account of interpretation, I first distinguish between two modes of interpretation: rehearsing and discursive. I argue that the former is the more basic one, relating to our respecting sources, rather than noticing signs, in action. In other (Wittgensteinian) words, we have to understand how we take (...)
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  39. Bing Wu, Roberta L. Klatzky & George D. Stetten (2012). Mental Visualization of Objects From Cross-Sectional Images. Cognition 123 (1):33.score: 9.0
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  40. Benedict C. Albensi, Erin V. Ilkanich, Gabriele Dini & Damir Janigro (2004). Elements of Scientific Visualization in Basic Neuroscience Research. Bioscience 54 (12):1127.score: 9.0
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  41. Jean C. Augustinack, Karl Helmer, Kristen E. Huber, Sita Kakunoori, Lilla Zöllei & Bruce Fischl (2010). Direct Visualization of the Perforant Pathway in the Human Brain with Ex Vivo Diffusion Tensor Imaging. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 4:42.score: 9.0
  42. Egbert J. Bakker (1993). Discourse and Performance: Involvement, Visualization and `Presence' in Homeric Poetry. Classical Antiquity 12 (1):1-29.score: 9.0
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  43. Jon Barwise & John Etchemendy (1998). Computers, Visualization, and the Nature of Reasoning. In Terrell Ward Bynum & James Moor (eds.), The Digital Phoenix: How Computers Are Changing Philosophy. Blackwell Publishers. 93--116.score: 9.0
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  44. Ann C. Howe & William Doody (1989). Spatial Visualization and Sex‐Related Differences in Science Achievement. Science Education 73 (6):703-709.score: 9.0
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  45. Akira Notsu, Hidetomo Ichihashi, Katsuhiro Honda & Osamu Katai (2009). Visualization of Balancing Systems Based on Naïve Psychological Approaches. AI and Society 23 (2):281-296.score: 9.0
    In this paper, we propose a novel medium for interactions based on an interpersonal psychological approach referred to as ‘naïve psychology’. We adopt the visual assessment of clustering tendency (VAT) to naïve psychology for the visual understanding of other people. The VAT algorithm produces a visual display that can be used to assess clustering tendencies in a set of persons (notions) by reconstructing a digital image representation of a square relational dissimilarity matrix for its set. This algorithm clearly represents two (...)
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  46. Alejandro Ojeda, Nima Bigdely-Shamlo & Scott Makeig (2014). MoBILAB: An Open Source Toolbox for Analysis and Visualization of Mobile Brain/Body Imaging Data. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.score: 9.0
  47. Jerrold L. Aronson (1994). Conditionals, Visualization, and Virtual Worlds. In A. A. Derksen (ed.), The Scientific Realism of Rom Harré. Tilburg University Press.score: 9.0
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  48. Robert Arp (2008). Scenario Visualization: An Evolutionary Account of Creative Problem Solving. A Bradford Book.score: 9.0
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  49. Robert Arp (2013). The Evolution of Scenario Visualization and the Early Hominin Mind. In. In Liz Swan (ed.), Origins of Mind. 143--159.score: 9.0
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