Search results for 'Visualizing' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Alan R. White (1987). Visualizing and Imagining Seeing. Analysis 47 (October):221-224.score: 15.0
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  2. Natika Newton (1989). Visualizing is Imagining Seeing: A Reply to White. Analysis 49 (March):77-81.score: 15.0
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  3. Richard K. Sherwin (2011). Visualizing Law in the Age of the Digital Baroque: Arabesques and Entanglements. Routledge.score: 12.0
    Introduction : law's oscillation between power and meaning -- Law's screen life : visualizing law in practice -- Images run riot : law on the landscape of the neo-baroque -- Theorizing the visual sublime : law's legitimation reconsidered -- The digital challenge : command and control culture and the ethical sublime -- Conclusion : visualizing law as integral rhetoric : harmonizing the ethical and the aesthetic.
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  4. Kirsten Mogensen (2013). Visualizing a Mass Murder: The Portraits of Anders Bering Breivik in Danish National Dailies. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 28 (1):64 - 67.score: 12.0
    (2013). Visualizing a Mass Murder: The Portraits of Anders Bering Breivik in Danish National Dailies. Journal of Mass Media Ethics: Vol. 28, No. 1, pp. 64-67. doi: 10.1080/08900523.2013.755083.
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  5. Steven M. Rosen (1973). A Plea for the Possibility of Visualizing Existence. Scientia (International Review of Scientific Synthesis) 108 (9-12):789-802.score: 12.0
    A dialectical, double-aspect model of general interaction is proposed as a means of visualizing existence. It is constructed from observation of the transformational properties of the Moebius surface, with hyperdimensional extrapolation to the Klein bottle. The interaction of systems is viewed as a process of circumversion (i.e. turning inside-out) whereby systems exchange relations, become mutually negated, then exchange identities. Interaction is discussed in the context of the PCT problem, symmetry, creation-annihilation, and uncertainty.
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  6. Adina Roskies, Visualizing Human Brain Function.score: 9.0
    Running head: Functional neuroimaging Abstract Several recently developed techniques enable the investigation of the neural basis of cognitive function in the human brain. Two of these, PET and fMRI, yield whole-brain images reflecting regional neural activity associated with the performance of specific tasks. This article explores the spatial and temporal capabilities and limitations of these techniques, and discusses technical, biological, and cognitive issues relevant to understanding the goals and methods of neuroimaging studies. The types of advances in understanding cognitive and (...)
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  7. John Zeimbekis (forthcoming). Seeing, Visualizing, and Believing: Pictures and Cognitive Penetration. In John Zeimbekis & Athanassios Raftopoulos (eds.), Cognitive Penetrability. Oxford University Press.score: 9.0
  8. Barbara Tversky (2011). Visualizing Thought. Topics in Cognitive Science 3 (3):499-535.score: 9.0
    Depictive expressions of thought predate written language by thousands of years. They have evolved in communities through a kind of informal user testing that has refined them. Analyzing common visual communications reveals consistencies that illuminate how people think as well as guide design; the process can be brought into the laboratory and accelerated. Like language, visual communications abstract and schematize; unlike language, they use properties of the page (e.g., proximity and place: center, horizontal/up–down, vertical/left–right) and the marks on it (e.g., (...)
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  9. Marcus Giaquinto (1992). Visualizing as a Means of Geometrical Discovery. Mind and Language 7 (4):382-401.score: 9.0
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  10. Sachiko Kusukawa (2011). Visualizing Medieval Medicine and Natural History, 1200-1550. Early Science and Medicine 16 (4):354-355.score: 9.0
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  11. M. Giaquinto (1993). Visualizing in Arithmetic. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 53 (2):385-396.score: 9.0
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  12. Martin Deitsch (1972). Visualizing. Mind 81 (January):113-115.score: 9.0
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  13. David C. Gooding (2010). Visualizing Scientific Inference. Topics in Cognitive Science 2 (1):15-35.score: 9.0
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  14. Steven E. Petersen & Adina L. Roskies (2001). Visualizing Human Brain Function. In E. Bizzi, P. Calissano & V. Volterra (eds.), Frontiers of Life, Vol Iii: The Intelligent Systems, Part One: The Brain of Homo Sapiens. Academic Press.score: 9.0
    Running head: Functional neuroimaging Abstract Several recently developed techniques enable the investigation of the neural basis of cognitive function in the human brain. Two of these, PET and fMRI, yield whole-brain images reflecting regional neural activity associated with the performance of specific tasks. This article explores the spatial and temporal capabilities and limitations of these techniques, and discusses technical, biological, and cognitive issues relevant to understanding the goals and methods of neuroimaging studies. The types of advances in understanding cognitive and (...)
     
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  15. Zenon Pylyshyn, S Eeingand Visualizing: I T' S N Otwhaty Ou T Hink.score: 9.0
    6. Seeing With the Mind’s Eye 1: The Puzzle of Mental Imagery .................................................6-1 6.1 What is the puzzle about mental imagery?..............................................................................6-1 6.2 Content, form and substance of representations ......................................................................6-6 6.3 What is responsible for the pattern of results obtained in imagery studies?.................................6-8..
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  16. Norvin Richards (1973). Depicting and Visualizing. Mind 82 (326):218-225.score: 9.0
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  17. Linda Williams (2010). Visualizing Subjectivity: Social Theory and the Role of Art as Metaphor of Self and Habitus. Thesis Eleven 103 (1):35-44.score: 9.0
    This paper considers the way social theorists draw on affective imagery to convey ideas about complex social processes such as the formation of subjectivity within a given habitus. The argument focuses on discussions of art in the work of Elias and Foucault to question whether imagery, and particularly imagery drawn from art, serves to simplify more complex processes of reasoning, or whether the image can be understood as a type of conceptual consolidation of an argument rather than a means to (...)
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  18. Katy Börner, Luca Dall'Asta, Weimao Ke & Alessandro Vespignani (2005). Studying the Emerging Global Brain: Analyzing and Visualizing the Impact of Co‐Authorship Teams. Complexity 10 (4):57-67.score: 9.0
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  19. Erica Torrens (2013). Visualizing the Order of Nature. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 44 (1):110-113.score: 9.0
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  20. Michael Benton (forthcoming). Visualizing Narrative: Bridging the" Aesthetic Gap". Journal of Aesthetic Education.score: 9.0
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  21. M. Emmison (1986). Visualizing the Economy: Fetishism and the Legitimation of Economic Life. Theory, Culture and Society 3 (2):81-97.score: 9.0
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  22. Debra Lippoldt & Growing Gardens (2004). Announcing the Joint 2005 Annual Meetings of the Agriculture, Food, and Human Values Society (AFHVS) and the Association for the Study of Food and Society (ASFS) Theme: Visualizing Food and Farm. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 17:447-450.score: 9.0
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  23. Bruce J. MacLennan (1993). Visualizing the Possibilities. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (2):356-357.score: 9.0
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  24. Antonis K. Petrides (2009). Verbalizing/Visualizing: Theatrical Masks and the Greek Epigram. Classical Quarterly 59 (02):494-.score: 9.0
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  25. Ruth Scodel (2008). Literature (C.) Kraus Et Al. Eds. Visualizing the Tragic. Drama, Myth, and Ritual in Greek Art and Literature: Essays in Honour of Froma Zeitlin. Pp. Xxii + 457, Illus. Oxford UP, 2007. £70. 9780199276028. [REVIEW] Journal of Hellenic Studies 128:190-.score: 9.0
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  26. Robert M. Stein (2012). Brigitte Miriam Bedos-Rezak, When Ego Was Imago: Signs of Identity in the Middle Ages. (Visualizing the Middle Ages 3.) Leiden and Boston: Brill, 2011. Pp. Xxix, 295; 32 Plates. $168. ISBN: 9789004192171. [REVIEW] Speculum 87 (2):525-527.score: 9.0
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  27. Todd Boli (2001). Jill M. Ricketts, Visualizing Boccaccio: Studies on Illustrations of” The Decameron,” From Giotto to Pasolini.(Cambridge Studies in New Art History and Criticism.) Cambridge, Eng.: Cambridge University Press, 1997. Pp. X, 214; 29 Black-and-White Illustrations. $60. [REVIEW] Speculum 76 (2):507-512.score: 9.0
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  28. Karen Harvey (2010). Visualizing Reproduction: A Cultural History of Early-Modern and Modern Medical Illustrations. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 31 (1):37-51.score: 9.0
    Written as a response to a conference exhibition of medical illustrations of reproduction, this article considers the gains of an interdisciplinary study of medical illustration to both historians and medics. The article insists that we should not only be attuned to the cultural work that such representations perform but also that such illustrations are the product of material medical practices and the often humane impulses that drive them.
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  29. Todd Holloway, Miran Bozicevic & Katy Börner (2007). Analyzing and Visualizing the Semantic Coverage of Wikipedia and its Authors. Complexity 12 (3):30-40.score: 9.0
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  30. Hiroe Kobuse, Toshitaka Morishima, Masayuki Tanaka, Genki Murakami, Masahiro Hirose & Yuichi Imanaka (forthcoming). Visualizing Variations in Organizational Safety Culture Across an Inter-Hospital Multifaceted Workforce. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice:n/a-n/a.score: 9.0
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  31. Gerry McDermott, Douglas M. Fox, Lindsay Epperly, Modi Wetzler, Annelise E. Barron, Mark A. Le Gros & Carolyn A. Larabell (2012). Visualizing and Quantifying Cell Phenotype Using Soft X‐Ray Tomography. Bioessays 34 (4):320-327.score: 9.0
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  32. Zenon W. Pylyshyn (2003). Seeing and Visualizing: It's Not What You Think. A Bradford Book.score: 9.0
    How we see and how we visualize: why the scientific account differs from our experience.
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  33. Hans Rämö (2011). Visualizing the Phronetic Organization: The Case of Photographs in CSR Reports. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 104 (3):371-387.score: 9.0
    Aspects of phronetic social science and phronetic organization research have been much debated over the recent years. So far, the visual aspects of communicating phronesis have gained little attention. Still organizations try to convey a desirable image of respectability and success, both internally and externally to the public. A channel for such information is corporate reporting, and particularly CSR reporting embrace values like fairness, goodness, and sustainability. This study explores how visual portrayals of supposedly wise and discerning values (phronesis) are (...)
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  34. Corine Schleif (2004). Madeline H. Caviness, Visualizing Women in the Middle Ages: Sight, Spectacle, and Scopic Economy. (The Middle Ages Series.) Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2001. Pp. X, 231; 80 Black-and-White Figures. $55. Companion Volume Reframing Medieval Art: Difference, Margins, Boundaries Online at Http://Nils.Lib.Tufts.Edu/Caviness. [REVIEW] Speculum 79 (1):149-152.score: 9.0
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  35. Martina Bagnoli (2013). Louise Bourdua and Robert Gibbs, Eds., A Wider Trecento: Studies in 13th- and 14th-Century European Art Presented to Julian Gardner. (Visualizing the Middle Ages 5.) Leiden: Brill, 2012. Pp. Xxxii, 213; 74 Black-and-White Figures. $166. ISBN: 9789004210769. [REVIEW] Speculum 88 (3):765-766.score: 9.0
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  36. Michael Batty (2010). Visualizing Space–Time Dynamics in Scaling Systems. Complexity 16 (2):51-63.score: 9.0
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  37. Roland Bleiker (2008). Visualizing Post-National Democracy. In David Campbell & Morton Schoolman (eds.), The New Pluralism: William Connolly and the Contemporary Global Condition. Duke University Press.score: 9.0
     
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  38. Lilyan A. Brudner & Douglas R. White (1997). Class, Property, and Structural Endogamy: Visualizing Networked Histories. [REVIEW] Theory and Society 26 (2-3):161-208.score: 9.0
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  39. T. Bussey (1999). Visualizing Recognition Memory. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 3 (7):253.score: 9.0
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  40. Oliver Sp Davis & Robert Plomin (2010). Visualizing Genetic Similarity at the Symptom Level: The Example of Learning Disabilities. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33 (2-3):155-157.score: 9.0
    Psychological traits and disorders are often interrelated through shared genetic influences. A combination of maximum-likelihood structural equation modelling and multidimensional scaling enables us to open a window onto the genetic architecture at the symptom level, rather than at the level of latent genetic factors. We illustrate this approach using a study of cognitive abilities involving over 5,000 pairs of twins.
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  41. Megan A. Dean (2011). Visualizing Resistance: Foucauldian Ethics and the Female Body Builder. Phaenex 6 (1):64-89.score: 9.0
    Drawing on the relation between disciplinary power and aesthetics, Honi Fern Haber argues that the muscled woman’s “revolting” body undermines patriarchy and empowers women. Consequently, female bodybuilding can be a Foucauldian and feminist practice of resistance. I will argue that Haber’s insistence on the visibility of embodied resistance is flawed. By positing a static goal and failing to sufficiently consider non-visible aspects of normalization, namely pleasure and pain, Haber risks reinscribing the muscled woman into yet another normalizing scheme. In the (...)
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  42. Aaron M. Ellison (1994). Right Between the Eyes Visualizing Data William S. Cleveland. Bioscience 44 (9):622-623.score: 9.0
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  43. David Fredrick (forthcoming). Time.deltaTime: The Vicissitudes of Presence in Visualizing Roman Houses with Game Engine Technology. [REVIEW] AI and Society:1-12.score: 9.0
    First drafted in 2006 and currently in version 2.1, the London Charter calls for the adoption of international standards for intellectual integrity, transparency, sustainability, and access in 3D modeling for cultural heritage. While the London Charter has been in the process of revision and distribution to the heritage community, game engines have become less expensive and more approachable. Several engines offer the ability to publish easily across operating systems, mobile devices, and the web, causing a rapid expansion in their use (...)
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  44. Frank R. Freemon (1978). Visualizing Visual Cortex in the Mind's Eye. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 1 (3):353.score: 9.0
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  45. Ken-Ichi Fukui, Kazumi Saito, Masahiro Kimura & Masayuki Numao (forthcoming). SBSOM: Self-Organizing Map For Visualizing Structure In The Time Series Of Hot Topics. Joint Workshop of Vietnamese Society of Ai, Sigkbs-Jsai, Ics-Ipsj, and Ieice-Sigai on Active Mining.score: 9.0
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  46. Eiko Ikegami (2011). Visualizing the Networked Self: Agency, Reflexivity, and the Social Life of Avatars. Social Research: An International Quarterly 78 (4):1155-1184.score: 9.0
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  47. Robin M. Jensen (2010). Ashes, Shadows, and Crosses: Visualizing Lent. Interpretation 64 (1):30-42.score: 9.0
    Lent is not normally thought of as a time for adding to or enriching the church's liturgy with visual art. This essay explores possibilities for using visual art that corresponds to the purpose of the season of Lent as a time for somber reflection and reconciliation.
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  48. Ludmilla Jordanova (2010). 6 Visualizing Identity. In Giselle Walker & E. S. Leedham-Green (eds.), Identity. Cambridge University Press. 21--127.score: 9.0
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  49. Arjo Klamer (2004). Visualizing the Economy. Social Research: An International Quarterly 71 (2):251-262.score: 9.0
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  50. Sarah Marusek (2012). Justice Can Never Truly Be Blind: Review of Richard Sherwin—Visualizing Law in the Age of the Digital Baroque: Arabesques and Entanglements. [REVIEW] International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 25 (1):157-159.score: 9.0
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