Search results for 'Volition' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  94
    Jing Zhu (2004). Locating Volition. Consciousness and Cognition 13 (2):302-322.
    In this paper, it is examined how neuroscience can help to understand the nature of volition by addressing the question whether volitions can be localized in the brain. Volitions, as acts of the will, are special mental events or activities by which an agent consciously and actively exercises her agency to voluntarily direct her thoughts and actions. If we can pinpoint when and where volitional events or activities occur in the brain and find out their neural underpinnings, this can (...)
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  2.  90
    Jing Zhu (2004). Understanding Volition. Philosophical Psychology 17 (2):247-274.
    The concept of volition has a long history in Western thought, but is looked upon unfavorably in contemporary philosophy and psychology. This paper proposes and elaborates a unifying conception of volition, which views volition as a mediating executive mental process that bridges the gaps between an agent's deliberation, decision and voluntary bodily action. Then the paper critically examines three major skeptical arguments against volition: volition is a mystery, volition is an illusion, and volition (...)
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  3.  41
    Jean E. Burns (1999). Volition and Physical Laws. Journal of Consciousness Studies 6 (10):27-47.
    The concept of free will is central to our lives, as we make day-to-day decisions, and to our culture, in our ethical and legal systems. The very concept implies that what we choose can produce a change in our physical environment, whether by pressing a switch to turn out electric lights or choosing a long-term plan of action which can affect many people. Yet volition is not a part of presently known physical laws and it is not even known (...)
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  4. Hugh J. McCann (1974). Volition and Basic Action. Philosophical Review 83 (4):451-473.
    The purpose of this paper is to defend the view that the bodily actions of men typicaly involve a mental action of voliton or willing, and that such mental acts are, in at least one important sense, the basic actions we perform when we do things like raise an arm, move a finger, or flex a muscle.
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  5.  38
    Scott E. Weiner (2003). Unity of Agency and Volition: Some Personal Reflections. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 10 (4):369-372.
  6.  12
    Jack Glaser & John F. Kihlstrom (2005). Compensatory Automaticity: Unconscious Volition is Not an Oxymoron. In Ran R. Hassin, James S. Uleman & John A. Bargh (eds.), The New Unconscious. Oxford Series in Social Cognition and Social Neuroscience. Oxford University Press 171-195.
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  7.  13
    Hamish J. McLeod, Mitchell K. Byrne & Rachel Aitken (2004). Automatism and Dissociation: Disturbances of Consciousness and Volition From a Psychological Perspective. International Journal of Law and Psychiatry 27 (5):471-487.
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  8.  99
    Harry G. Frankfurt (1999). Necessity, Volition, and Love. Cambridge University Press.
    One of the most influential of contemporary philosophers, Harry Frankfurt has made major contributions to the philosophy of action, moral psychology, and the study of Descartes. This collection of essays complements an earlier collection published by Cambridge, The Importance of What We Care About. Some of the essays develop lines of thought found in the earlier volume. They deal in general with foundational metaphysical and epistemological issues concerning Descartes, moral philosophy, and philosophical anthropology. Some bear upon topics in political philosophy (...)
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  9. Hakwan Lau (2009). Volition and the Function of Consciousness. Faith and Philosophy 26 (5):537-552.
    People have intuitively assumed that many acts of volition are not influenced by unconscious information. However, the available evidence suggests that under suitable conditions, unconscious information can influence behavior and the underlying neural mechanisms. One possibility is that stimuli that are consciously perceived tend to yield strong signals in the brain, and this makes us think that consciousness has the function of sending such strong signals. However, if we could create conditions where the stimuli could produce strong signals but (...)
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  10. Gilberto Gomes (1999). Volition and the Readiness Potential. Journal of Consciousness Studies 6 (8-9):59-76.
    1. Introduction The readiness potential was found to precede voluntary acts by about half a second or more (Kornhuber & Deecke, 1965). Kornhuber (1984) discussed the readiness potential in terms of volition, arguing that it is not the manifestation of an attentional processes. Libet discussed it in relation to consciousness and to free will (Libet et al. 1983a; 1983b; Libet, 1985, 1992, 1993). Libet asked the following questions. Are voluntary acts initiated by a conscious decision to act? Are the (...)
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  11.  17
    Jing Zhu (2003). Reclaiming Volition: An Alternative Interpretation of Libet's Experiment. Journal of Consciousness Studies 10 (11):61-77.
    Based on his experimental studies, Libet claims that voluntary actions are initiated by unconscious brain activities well before intentions or decisions to act are consciously experienced by people. This account conflicts with our common-sense conception of human agency, in which people consciously and intentionally exert volitions or acts of will to initiate voluntary actions. This paper offers an alternative interpretation of Libet's experiment. The cause of the intentional acts performed by the subjects in Libet's experiment should not be exclusively attributed (...)
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  12.  75
    Thomas Metzinger (2006). Conscious Volition and Mental Representation: Toward a More Fine-Grained Analysis. In Natalie Sebanz & Wolfgang Prinz (eds.), Disorders of Volition. MIT Press
    A Bradford Book The MIT Press Cambridge, Massachusetts London, England.
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  13. Marc Jeannerod (2006). From Volition to Agency: The Mechanism of Action Recognition and its Failures. In Natalie Sebanz & Wolfgang Prinz (eds.), Disorders of Volition. MIT Press
  14.  6
    Hengxi Li & Hengwei Li (2012). Second-Order Volition and Conflict Between Desires. Open Journal of Philosophy 2 (1):25-31.
    In Freedom of the Will and the Concept of a Person, Harry Frankfurt put forward a theory that what is essential to be a person is second-order volition. The notion of second-order volition can be used as a key conceptual tool in understanding the conflict between desires. By means of the notion, this paper argues that the conflict between desires in our minds lies in the conflict between second-order volitions, other than the conflict between first-order desires. Based on (...)
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  15.  16
    Hakwan Lau (2009). Volition and the Function of Consciousness. Faith and Philosophy 26 (5):537-552.
    People have intuitively assumed that many acts of volition are not influenced by unconscious information. However, the available evidence suggests that under suitable conditions, unconscious information can influence behavior and the underlying neural mechanisms. One possibility is that stimuli that are consciously perceived tend to yield strong signals in the brain, and this makes us think that consciousness has the function of sending such strong signals. However, if we could create conditions where the stimuli could produce strong signals but (...)
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  16.  16
    Walter Mischel, David Laibson, John Jonides, Chandra Sripada & Ethan Kross, Volition, Self-Control, and Public Policy: Symposium on the Tanner Lecture on Human Values.
    The 2014 Tanner Symposium features a panel of speakers discussing current research in the areas of volition and self-control and the effects of that research for issues of public policy.
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  17.  22
    Dr Wayne Christensen (2007). The Evolutionary Origins of Volition. In Cogprints.
    It appears to be a straightforward implication of distributed cognition principles that there is no integrated executive control system (e.g. Brooks 1991, Clark 1997). If distributed cognition is taken as a credible paradigm for cognitive science this in turn presents a challenge to volition because the concept of volition assumes integrated information processing and action control. For instance the process of forming a goal should integrate information about the available action options. If the goal is acted upon these (...)
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  18.  63
    Jeffrey Purinton (1999). Epicurus on 'Free Volition' and the Atomic Swerve. Phronesis 44 (4):253-299.
    The central thesis of this paper is that Epicurus held that swerves of the constituent atoms of agents' minds cause the agents' volitions from the bottom up. "De Rerum Natura" 2.216-93 is examined at length, and Lucretius is found to be making the following claims: both atoms and macroscopic bodies sometimes swerve as they fall, but so minimally that they are undetectable. Swerves are oblique deviations, not right-angled turns. Swerves must be posited to account both for cosmogonic collisions quite generally (...)
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  19.  8
    Bernard J. Baars (1993). Why Volition is a Foundation Issue for Psychology. Consciousness and Cognition 2 (4):281-309.
    Since the advent of behaviorism the question of volition or "will" has been largely neglected. We consider evidence indicating that two identical behaviors may be quite distinct with respect to volition: For instance, with practice the details of predictable actions become less and less voluntary, even if the behavior itself does not visibly change. Likewise, people can voluntarily imitate involuntary slips they have just made. Such examples suggest that the concept of volition applies not to visible behavior (...)
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  20.  9
    S. R. Coleman & Sandra Webster (1988). The Problem of Volition and the Conditioned Reflex. Part II. Voluntary-Responding Subjects, 1951-1980. Behaviorism 16 (1):17-49.
    The operation of voluntary processes can contaminate the study of Pavlovian conditioned responses in humans. The problem of voluntary control had apparently been solved by about 1940, particularly in human eyelid conditioning. Nonetheless, the problem returned in the early 1950s, calling forth a variety of methodological procedures for removing voluntary responses and/or voluntary-responding subjects from eyelid-conditioning data. During the 1960s, disagreement arose regarding the efficiency and comparability of alternative data-correction procedures; the rationale for data-correction; and whether, and under what experimental (...)
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  21.  6
    S. R. Coleman (1985). The Problem of Volition and the Conditioned Reflex. Behaviorism 13 (2):99-124.
    From its earliest beginnings, American conditioning research using human subjects had to deal with the possibility that subjects might voluntarily control the reaction that the experimenter attempts to condition, with the result that voluntary control contaminates the study of conditioning in humans. A preliminary solution to the problem was achieved around 1940, ending the time frame of this survey. This article provides an historical survey of the conceptual background of the opposition of volition and reflexes; describes manifestations of the (...)
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  22.  4
    David H. Ingvar (1999). On Volition: A Neurophysiologically Oriented Essay. Journal of Consciousness Studies 6 (8-9):8-9.
    During the last decades, the enigmatic field of volition has been the object of quantitative brain mapping studies. In this essay, emphasis will be given to brain mapping observations during overt or imagined willed acts in conscious normal individuals. The findings suggest that such acts are ‘formulated’ in the frontal/prefrontal cortex as neuronal programs for future motor, behavioural, verbal, or cognitive acts. During imagined movements or speech, brain mapping reveals important prefrontal activations which contrast to perirolandic activations during overt (...)
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  23.  30
    Bruce Mangan (2003). Volition and Property Dualism. Journal of Consciousness Studies 10 (12):29-34.
    My overall aim here is to intersect two issues central to Max Velmans' wide-ranging paper. The first concerns one of the most vexing problems in consciousness research — how best to approach the terms 'mental' and 'physical'. The second looks at the phenomenology of volition, and the degree to which information presumably necessary for making voluntary conscious decisions is, or is not, present in consciousness. Velmans offers three general reasons to motivate his position: the physical world is 'causally closed' (...)
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  24.  2
    Conal Boyce (2012). Recovering From Libet's Left Turn Into Veto-as-Volition: A Proposal for Dealing Honestly with the Central Mystery of Libet (1983). Open Journal of Philosophy 2 (1):17-24.
    With certain topics the general reader experiences a double-whammy wherein one must peer through a curtain of needlessly obscure jargon to try glimpsing something that is inherently weird in nature. Bell’s nonlocality was once such a topic, but authors have had considerable success over the years in showing where the line is between the enigma itself and the human-made oddities surrounding it . Libet-ology has yet to undergo that de-mystifying process. Accordingly, our first order of business here is to restate (...)
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  25.  4
    Wayne Christensen (2007). 12 The Evolutionary Origins of Volition. In Don Ross, David Spurrett, Harold Kincaid & G. Lynn Stephens (eds.), Distributed Cognition and the Will: Individual Volition and Social Context. MIT Press 255.
  26.  15
    Dr Wayne Christensen (2006). The Evolutionary Origins of Volition. In [Book Chapter] (in Press).
    It appears to be a straightforward implication of distributed cognition principles that there is no integrated executive control system (e.g. Brooks 1991, Clark 1997). If distributed cognition is taken as a credible paradigm for cognitive science this in turn presents a challenge to volition because the concept of volition assumes integrated information processing and action control. For instance the process of forming a goal should integrate information about the available action options. If the goal is acted upon these (...)
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  27.  4
    Sean A. Spence & Chris D. Frith (1999). Towards a Functional Anatomy of Volition. Journal of Consciousness Studies 6 (8-9):8-9.
    In this paper we examine the functional anatomy of volition, as revealed by modern brain imaging techniques, in conjunction with neuropsychological data derived from human and non-human primates using other methodologies. A number of brain regions contribute to the performance of consciously chosen, or ‘willed', actions. Of particular importance is dorsolateral prefrontal cortex , together with those brain regions with which it is connected, via cortico-subcortical and cortico-cortical circuits. That aspect of free will which is concerned with the voluntary (...)
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  28.  7
    D. Matsumoto & M. Lee (1993). Consciousness, Volition, and the Neuropsychology of Facial Expressions of Emotion. Consciousness and Cognition 2 (3):237-54.
    Although we have learned much about the neuropsychological control of facial expressions of emotion, there is still much work to do. We suggest that future work integrate advances in our theoretical understanding of the roles of volition and consciousness in the elicitation of emotion and the production of facial expressions with advances in our understanding of its underlying neurophysiology. We first review the facial musculature and the neural paths thought to innervate it, as well as previous attempts at understanding (...)
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  29.  2
    Erwin Panofsky, Kenneth J. Northcott & Joel Snyder (1981). The Concept of Artistic Volition. Critical Inquiry 8 (1):17.
    Objections arise to the concept of artistic intention based upon the psychology of a period. Here too we experience trends or volitions which can only be explained by precisely those artistic creations which in their own turn demand an explanation on the basis of these trends and volitions. Thus "Gothic" man or the "primitive" from whose alleged existence we wish to explain a particular artistic product is in truth the hypostatized impression which has been culled from the works of art (...)
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  30.  6
    Edward S. Reed (1990). The Trapped Infinity: Cartesian Volition as Conceptual Nightmare. Philosophical Psychology 3 (1):101-121.
    Abstract Descartes's theory of volition as expressed in his Passions of the Soul is analyzed and outlined. The focus is not on Descartes's proposed answers to questions about the nature and processes of volition, but on his way of formulating questions about the nature of volition. It is argued that the assumptions underlying Descartes's questions have become ?intellectual strait?jackets? for all who are interested in volition: neuroscientists, philosophers and psychologists. It is shown that Descartes's basic assumption?that (...)
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  31. Jordan Grafman & Frank Krueger (2006). Volition and the Human Prefrontal Cortex. In Natalie Sebanz & Wolfgang Prinz (eds.), Disorders of Volition. MIT Press
     
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  32. Patrick J. Connolly (2014). Locke and Wilkins on Inner Sense and Volition. Locke Studies 14:239-259.
    The purpose of this paper is to elucidate two interesting parallels between views discussed in John Wilkins’ Of the Principles and Duties of Natural Religion and positions developed by John Locke in his Essay Concerning Human Understanding. The first parallel pertains to a faculty of inner sense. Both authors carve out a central role for this introspective perceptual modality. The second parallel pertains to volition and free will. Both authors employ an investigative methodology which privileges first-personal experiences of choosing (...)
     
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  33.  0
    P. Nowakowski (2009). Breaking the Spell of Volition. Book Review Of: Natalie Sebanz and Wolfgang Prinz (Eds.) (2006) Disorders of Volition. Constructivist Foundations 4 (3):172 - 173.
    Summary: This volume is interesting and worth reading as an introduction to the philosophical and cognitive neuroscience research on volition.
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  34. Michael Strauss (1999). Volition and Valuation: A Phenomenology of Sensational, Emotional, and Conceptual Values. University Press of America.
    Volition and Valuation is a typology of valuations, and conflicts between values, using a phenomenological approach that treats the difference between cognitive-thinking and value-thinking as a difference in the mode of intentionality towards the objects. It also suggests a method for axiology to bracket the validity of the values described, acknowledge that the observation of phenomena of consciousness goes beyond empirical observation, and has a character of pure intuition or an intuition of essences which are a source of metavaluative (...)
     
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  35.  10
    Andrew Tallon (1997). Head and Heart: Affection, Cognition, Volition as Triune Consciousness. Fordham University Press.
    Head and Heart proposes a theory of a triune consciousness formed by the heart and mind, composed of an equal partnership of reason, will, and affection. Professor Tallon sets out asking whether and how affective consciousness fits into this triad. By first defining affection in terms of intentionality (as the theory of a triune consciousness is possible only when affectivity has been shown to participate in intentionality), he argues that affection, in its full scope of passion, emotion, and mood, earns (...)
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  36. Jing Zhu (2003). The Conative Mind: Volition and Action. Dissertation, University of Waterloo (Canada)
    This work is an attempt to restore volition as a respectable topic for scientific studies. Volition, traditionally conceived as the act of will, has been largely neglected in contemporary science and philosophy. I first develop a volitional theory of action by elaborating a unifying conception of volition, where volitions are construed as special kinds of mental action by which an agent consciously and actively bridge the gaps between deliberation, decision and intentional action. Then I argue that the (...)
     
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  37.  14
    Alexander Schlegel, Prescott Alexander, Walter Sinnott-Armstrong, Adina Roskies, Peter Ulric Tse & Thalia Wheatley (2015). Hypnotizing Libet: Readiness Potentials with Non-Conscious Volition. Consciousness and Cognition 33:196-203.
    The readiness potential (RP) is one of the most controversial topics in neuroscience and philosophy due to its perceived relevance to the role of conscious willing in action. Libet and colleagues reported that RP onset precedes both volitional movement and conscious awareness of willing that movement, suggesting that the experience of conscious will may not cause volitional movement (Libet, Gleason, Wright, & Pearl, 1983). Rather, they suggested that the RP indexes unconscious processes that may actually cause both volitional movement and (...)
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  38.  3
    Stephen R. Palmquist (2015). What is Kantian Gesinnung_? On the Priority of Volition Over Metaphysics and Psychology in _Religion Within the Bounds of Bare Reason. Kantian Review 20 (2):235-264.
    Kants theories of both general moral decision-making and specifically religious conversion. It is argued that Kantian Gesinnung is volitional, referring to a personconvictionberzeugung (). This is confirmed by a detailed analysis of the 169 occurrences of Gesinnung and cognate words in Religion. It contrasts with what is suggested by translating Gesinnung as, which reinforces a tendency to interpret the notion more metaphysically, and also with Pluharattitude’, which has too strongly psychological connotations.
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  39.  9
    Jeffrey M. Schwartz (1999). A Role for Volition and Attention in the Generation of New Brain Circuitry. Toward a Neurobiology of Mental Force. Journal of Consciousness Studies 6 (8-9):8-9.
    Obsessive-compulsive disorder is a commonly occurring neuropsychiatric condition characterized by bothersome intrusive thoughts and urges that frequently lead to repetitive dysfunctional behaviours such as excessive handwashing. There are well-documented alterations in cerebral function which appear to be closely related to the manifestation of these symptoms. Controlled studies of cognitive-behavioural therapy techniques utilizing the active refocusing of attention away from the intrusive phenomena of OCD and onto adaptive alternative activities have demonstrated both significant improvements in clinical symptoms and systematic changes in (...)
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  40. James O. Pawelski (1997). Perception, Cognition, and Volition: The Radical and Integrated Individualism of William James. Dissertation, The Pennsylvania State University
    Although William James claims be a "rabid individualist" and although his commentators agree that his individualism is central to his philosophical views, neither he nor they give an explicit account of that individualism. My goal in this dissertation is to provide such an account. ;In the first three chapters, I discuss the main contexts in which James's individualism arises: the political context, in which James contends that the contributions of individual geniuses are the catalysts of social change; the psychological context, (...)
     
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  41.  58
    Frederick Adams & Alfred R. Mele (1992). The Intention/Volition Debate. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 22 (3):323-337.
  42.  1
    James L. Ringo (1985). Timing Volition: Questions of What and When About W. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 8 (4):550-551.
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  43.  49
    Paul Brown (2010). Back to the Future: Pierre Janet, Emotion, and Volition. Emotion Review 2 (4):401-401.
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  44.  6
    David Spurrett, Don Ross, Harold Kincaid & Lynn Stephens (eds.) (2007). Distributed Cognition and the Will: Individual Volition and Social Context. MIT Press.
    Philosophers and behavioral scientists discuss what, if anything, of the traditionalconcept of individual conscious will can survive recent scientific discoveries that humandecision-making is distributed across different brain processes and ...
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  45.  8
    Myrthel Dogge, Marloes Schaap, Ruud Custers, Daniel M. Wegner & Henk Aarts (2012). When Moving Without Volition: Implied Self-Causation Enhances Binding Strength Between Involuntary Actions and Effects. Consciousness and Cognition 21 (1):501-506.
    The conscious awareness of voluntary action is associated with systematic changes in time perception: The interval between actions and outcomes is experienced as compressed in time. Although this temporal binding is thought to result from voluntary movement and provides a window to the sense of agency, recent studies challenge this idea by demonstrating binding in involuntary movement. We offer a potential account for these findings by proposing that binding between involuntary actions and effects can occur when self-causation is implied. Participants (...)
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  46.  19
    Gilles Lafargue & Nicolas Franck (2009). Effort Awareness and Sense of Volition in Schizophrenia. Consciousness and Cognition 18 (1):277-289.
    Contemporary experimental research has emphasised the role of centrally generated signals arising from premotor areas in voluntary muscular force perception. It is therefore generally accepted that judgements of force are based on a central sense, known as the sense of effort, rather than on a sense of intra-muscular tension. Interestingly, the concept of effort is also present in the classical philosophy: to the French philosopher Maine de Biran [Maine de Biran . Mémoire sur la décomposition de la pensée , Vrin, (...)
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  47.  25
    Benjamin Libet (1992). The Neural Time - Factor in Perception, Volition and Free Will. Revue de Métaphysique et de Morale 97 (2):255 - 272.
  48.  20
    Hugh McCann (1975). Trying, Paralysis, and Volition. Review of Metaphysics 28 (3):423-442.
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  49.  41
    Jing Zhu (2004). Intention and Volition. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 34 (2):175 - 193.
  50. William J. Courtenay (1990). Capacity and Volition: A History of the Distinction of Absolute and Ordained Power. P. Lubrina.
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