10 found
Sort by:
  1. Marianne Benard, Huib de Vriend, Paul van Haperen & Volkert Beekman (2010). Science and Society in Dialogue About Marker Assisted Selection. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 23 (4):317-329.
    Analysis of a European Union funded biotechnology project on plant genomics and marker assisted selection in Solanaceous crops shows that the organization of a dialogue between science and society to accompany technological innovations in plant breeding faces practical challenges. Semi-structured interviews with project participants and a survey among representatives of consumer and other non-governmental organizations show that the professed commitment to dialogue on science and biotechnology is rather shallow and has had limited application for all involved. Ultimately, other priorities tend (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Volkert Beekman (2008). Consumer Rights to Informed Choice on the Food Market. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 11 (1):61 - 72.
    The discourse about traceability in food chains focused on traceability as means towards the end of managing health risks. This discourse witnessed a call to broaden traceability to accommodate consumer concerns about foods that are not related to health. This call envisions the development of ethical traceability. This paper presents a justification of ethical traceability. The argument is couched in liberal distinctions, since the call for ethical traceability is based on intuitions about consumer rights to informed choice. The paper suggests (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Volkert Beekman & Frans W. A. Brom (2007). Ethical Tools to Support Systematic Public Deliberations About the Ethical Aspects of Agricultural Biotechnologies. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 20 (1):3-12.
    This special issue of the Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics presents so-called ethical tools that are developed to support systematic public deliberations about the ethical aspects of agricultural biotechnologies. This paper firstly clarifies the intended connotations of the term “ethical tools” and argues that such tools can support liberal democracies to cope with the issues that are raised by the application of genetic modification and other modern biotechnologies in agriculture and food production. The paper secondly characterizes the societal discussion (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Volkert Beekman (2006). Feeling Food: The Rationality of Perception. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 19 (3):301-312.
    Regulatory bodies tend to treat people’s emotional responses towards foods as a nuisance for rational opinion-formation and decision-making. This position is thought to be supported by such evidence as: (1) people showing negative emotional responses to the idea of eating meat products from vaccinated livestock; and (2) people showing positive emotional responses to Magnum’s “7 sins” marketing campaign. Such cases are thought to support the idea that regulatory communication about foods should abstract from people’s emotional perceptions and that corporate marketing (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Volkert Beekman (2004). Environmental Utilization Space Between Science and Politics. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 17 (3):293-300.
    This paper addresses the issue of operationalizing, or quantifying, sustainable development as a practical guideline for day-to-day environmental policy-making. It criticizes attempts at quantifying some environmental utilization space and argues that the uncertainty of scientific knowledge about the unintended environmental repercussions of consumptive choices casts serious doubt about attempts to justify government intervention in non-sustainable lifestyles.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Volkert Beekman (2004). Sustainable Development and Future Generations. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 17 (1):3-22.
    This paper argues, mainly on the basis of Rawls''s savings principle, Wissenburg''s restraint principle, Passmore's chains of love, and De-Shalit's transgenerational communities, for a double interpretation of sustainable development as a principle of intergenerational justice and a future-oriented green ideal. This double interpretation (1) embraces the restraint principle and the argument that no individualcan claim an unconditional right to destroy environmental goods as a baseline that could justify directive strategies for government intervention in non-sustainable lifestyles, and (2) suggests that people's (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Volkert Beekman & Humberto Rosa (2003). From the Guest Editors. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 16 (6):525-529.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Volkert Beekman, M. Collinson & Gary L. Comstock (2001). The Editor has Review Copies of the Following Books. Potential Reviewers Should Contact the Editor to Obtain a Review Copy (Rhaynes@ Phil. Ufl. Edu). Books Not Previously Listed Are in Bold-Faced Type. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 14:363-364.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Volkert Beekman (2000). You Are What You Eat: Meat, Novel Protein Foods, and Consumptive Freedom. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 12 (2):185-196.
    Animal husbandry has been accused ofmaltreating animals, polluting the environment, and soon. These accusations were thought to be answered whenthe Dutch research program ``Sustainable TechnologicalDevelopment'' (STD) suggested a government-initiatedconversion from meat to novel protein foods (NPFs).STD reasoned that if consumers converted from meat toNPFs, non-sustainable animal husbandry would no longerbe needed. Whereas STD only worried about how toconstruct NPFs with a meat bite, this paper drawsattention to the presumed, but problematic, role forthe government in the execution of the STDsuggestions. Although (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Frans W. A. Brom & Volkert Beekman (2000). Guest Editorial. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 12 (1):5-7.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation