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  1. Voltairine de Cleyre, Anarchism (1901).
    spirit of Quiescence, the spirit of Unrest; the spirit of Immobility, the spirit of Change; the spirit of Hold-fast-to-that-which-you-have, the spirit of Let-go-and-fly-to-that-which-youhave-not; the spirit of the slow and steady builder, careful of its labors, loath to part with any of its achievements, wishful to keep, and unable to discriminate between what is worth keeping and what is better cast aside, and the spirit of the inspirational destroyer, fertile in creative fancies, volatile, careless in its luxuriance of effort, inclined to (...)
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  2. Voltairine de Cleyre, Anarchism and American Traditions (1908).
    isolated conditions, and hard pioneer life, grew during the colonization period of one hundred and seventy years from the settling of Jamestown to the outburst of the Revolution. This was in fact the great constitution-making epoch, the period of charters guaranteeing more or less of liberty, the general tendency of which is well described by Wm. Penn in speaking of the charter for Pennsylvania: “I want to put it out of my power, or that of my successors, to do mischief.”.
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  3. Voltairine de Cleyre, Direct Action (1912?).
    for human progress to pursue, if it is to be progress at all, who, having such a route on his mind’s map, has endeavored to point it out to others; to make them see it as he sees it; who in so doing has chosen what appeared to him clear and simple expressions to convey his thoughts to others. – to such a one it appears matter for regret and confusion of spirit that the phrase “Direct Action” has suddenly acquired (...)
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  4. Voltairine de Cleyre, Sex Slavery (1890).
    dim light from the corridor without, a narrow window, barred and sunken in the stone, a grated door! Beyond its hideous iron latticework, within the ghastly walls, – a man! An old man, gray-haired and wrinkled, lame and suffering. There he sits, in his great loneliness, shut in front all the earth. There he walks, to and fro, within his measured space, apart from all he loves! There, for every night in five long years to come, he will walk alone, (...)
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  5. Voltairine de Cleyre, The Economic Tendency of Freethought (1890).
    which I propose as a text for this discourse may be found. Alluding to the change in the condition of France brought about by the Revolution of Â’93, Thomas Paine says.
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  6. Voltairine de Cleyre, The Philosophy of Selfishness and Metaphysical Ethics (1891).
    interested. Interested because I believe that as one of the leaders of the ethical movement Mr. Slater is aware that there is no more frequent or more fatal error to overcome, in his work, than this very philosophy of selfishness, and therefore should be one of those best conversant with the proofs of its shallowness and falsity.
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  7. Voltairine de Cleyre, Why I Am An Anarchist (1897).
    addressing you, that probably the most easy and natural way for me to explain Anarchism would be for me to give the reasons why I myself am an Anarchist. I am not sure that they were altogether right in the matter, because in giving the reasons why I am an Anarchist, I may perhaps infuse too much of my own personality into the subject, giving reasons sufficient unto myself, but which cool reflection might convince me were not particularly striking as (...)
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  8. Voltairine de Cleyre, The Dominant Idea (1910).
    DI.1 On everything that lives, if one looks searchingly, is limned the shadow line of an idea – an idea, dead or living, sometimes stronger when dead, with rigid, unswerving lines that mark the living embodiment with the stern immobile cast of the non living. Daily we move among these unyielding shadows, less pierceable, more enduring than granite, with the blackness of ages in them, dominating living, changing bodies, with dead, unchanging souls. And we meet, also, living souls dominating dying (...)
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  9. Voltairine de Cleyre, They Who Marry Do Ill (1908).
    MDI.4 So much as I have been able to put together the pieces of the universe in my small head, there is no absolute right or wrong; there is only a relativity, depending on the consciously though very slowly altering condition of a social race in respect to the rest of the world. Right and wrong are social conceptions: mind, I do not say human conceptions. The names “right” and “wrong,” truly, are of human invention only; but the conception “right” (...)
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  10. Voltairine de Cleyre (2005). Exquisite Rebel: The Essays of Voltairine de Cleyre -- Anarchist, Feminist, Genius. State University of New York Press.
    Brings the writings of de Cleyre out of undeserved obscurity.
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