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Profile: Wendy A Rogers (Macquarie University)
  1. C. Degeling, M. Rock & W. A. Rogers (2012). Testing Relationships: Ethical Arguments for Screening for Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus with HbA1C. Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (3):180-183.
    Since the 1990s, glycated haemoglobin (HbA1C) has been the gold standard for monitoring glycaemic control in people diagnosed as having either type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) or type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Discussions are underway about diagnosing diabetes mellitus on the basis of HbA1C titres and using HbA1C tests to screen for T2DM. These discussions have focused on the relative benefits for individual patients, with some attention directed towards reduced costs to healthcare systems and benefits to society. We argue that (...)
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  2. W. A. Rogers (2006). Feminism and Public Health Ethics. Journal of Medical Ethics 32 (6):351-354.
    This paper sketches an account of public health ethics drawing upon established scholarship in feminist ethics. Health inequities are one of the central problems in public health ethics; a feminist approach leads us to examine not only the connections between gender, disadvantage, and health, but also the distribution of power in the processes of public health, from policy making through to programme delivery. The complexity of public health demands investigation using multiple perspectives and an attention to detail that is capable (...)
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  3. W. A. Rogers (2004). Evidence Based Medicine and Justice: A Framework for Looking at the Impact of EBM Upon Vulnerable or Disadvantaged Groups. Journal of Medical Ethics 30 (2):141-145.
    This article examines the implicit promises of fairness in evidence based medicine , namely to avoid discrimination through objective processes, and to distribute effective treatments fairly. The relationship between EBM and vulnerable groups is examined. Several aspects of EBM are explored: the way evidence is created , and the way evidence is applied in clinical care and health policy. This analysis suggests that EBM turns our attention away from social and cultural factors that influence health and focuses on a narrow (...)
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  4. W. A. Rogers (2003). Confidentiality and the Ethics of Medical Ethics. Journal of Medical Ethics 29 (4):220-224.
    In this paper we consider the use of cases in medical ethics research and teaching. To date, there has been little discussion about the consent or confidentiality requirements that ought to govern the use of cases in these areas. This is in marked contrast to the requirements for consent to publish cases in clinical journals, or to use personal information in research. There are a number of reasons why it might be difficult to obtain consent to use cases in ethics. (...)
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  5. W. A. Rogers (2002). Is There a Moral Duty for Doctors to Trust Patients? Journal of Medical Ethics 28 (2):77-80.
    In this paper I argue that it is morally important for doctors to trust patients. Doctors' trust of patients lays the foundation for medical relationships which support the exercise of patient autonomy, and which lead to an enriched understanding of patients' interests. Despite the moral and practical desirability of trust, distrust may occur for reasons relating to the nature of medicine, and the social and cultural context within which medical care is provided. Whilst it may not be possible to trust (...)
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  6. W. A. Rogers (1999). Beneficence in General Practice: An Empirical Investigation. Journal of Medical Ethics 25 (5):388-393.
    OBJECTIVES: To study and report the attitudes of patients and general practitioners (GPs) concerning the obligation of doctors to act for the good of their patients, and to provide a practical account of beneficence in general practice. DESIGN: Semi-structured interviews administered to GPs and patients. SETTING AND SAMPLE: Participants randomly recruited from an age and gender stratified list of GPs in a geographically defined region of South Australia. The sample comprised twenty-one general practitioners and seventeen patients recruited by participating GPs. (...)
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  7. B. R. Bugelski, R. A. Coyer & W. A. Rogers (1952). A Criticism of Pre-Acquisition and Pre-Extinction of Expectancies. Journal of Experimental Psychology 44 (1):27.
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