8 found
Sort by:
See also:
Profile: W. Ford Doolittle (Dalhousie University)
  1. W. Ford Doolittle, Julius Lukeš, John M. Archibald, Patrick J. Keeling & Michael W. Gray (unknown). Insights & Perspectives. Bioessays 33:427 - 429.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. W. Ford Doolittle (forthcoming). Natural Selection Through Survival Alone, and the Possibility of Gaia. Biology and Philosophy:1-9.
    Here I advance two related evolutionary propositions. (1) Natural selection is most often considered to require competition between reproducing “individuals”, sometimes quite broadly conceived, as in cases of clonal, species or multispecies-community selection. But differential survival of non-competing and non-reproducing individuals will also result in increasing frequencies of survival-promoting “adaptations” among survivors, and thus is also a kind of natural selection. (2) Darwinists have challenged the view that the Earth’s biosphere is an evolved global homeostatic system. Since there is only (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. W. Ford Doolittle (2013). Microbial Neopleomorphism. Biology and Philosophy 28 (2):351-378.
    Our understanding of what microbes are and how they evolve has undergone many radical shifts since the late nineteenth century, when many still believed that bacteria could be spontaneously generated and most thought microbial “species” (if any) to be unstable and interchangeable in form and function (pleomorphic). By the late twentieth century, an ontology based on single cells and definable species with predictable properties, evolving like species of animals or plants, was widely accepted. Now, however, genomic and metagenomic data show (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. W. Ford Doolittle, Julius Lukeš, John M. Archibald, Patrick J. Keeling & Michael W. Gray (2011). Comment on “Does Constructive Neutral Evolution Play an Important Role in the Origin of Cellular Complexity?” DOI 10.1002/Bies. 201100010. [REVIEW] Bioessays 33 (6):427-429.
  5. W. Ford Doolittle (2010). The Attempt on the Life of the Tree of Life: Science, Philosophy and Politics. Biology and Philosophy 25 (4):455-473.
  6. W. Ford Doolittle & Olga Zhaxybayeva (2010). Metagenomics and the Units of Biological Organization. Bioscience 60 (2):102-112.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. David R. Edgell & W. Ford Doolittle (1997). Archaebacterial Genomics: The Complete Genome Sequence of Methanococcus Jannaschii. Bioessays 19 (1):1-4.
  8. W. Ford Doolittle (1984). Some Broader Evolutionary Issues Which Emerge From Contemporary Molecular Biological Data. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1984:129 - 144.
    The genome contains elements which are most easily understood as the products of selection operating at the level of the genome, without regard to phenotypic effect. The properties of such elements, and more general implications of molecular biological data, are discussed.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation