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Walter Glannon [71]W. Glannon [16]
  1. Emily Bell, Eric Racine, Paula Chiasson, Maya Dufourcq-Brana, Laura B. Dunn, Joseph J. Fins, Paul J. Ford, Walter Glannon, Nir Lipsman, Mary Ellen Macdonald, Debra J. H. Mathews & Mary Pat Mcandrews (forthcoming). Beyond Consent in Research. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics:1-8.
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  2. W. Glannon (forthcoming). Anaesthesia, Amnesia and Harm. Journal of Medical Ethics.
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  3. W. Glannon (forthcoming). Taylor on Posthumous Organ Procurement. Journal of Medical Ethics.
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  4. Walter Glannon (ed.) (forthcoming). Free Will and the Brain: Neuroscientific, Philosophical, and Legal Perspectives on Free Will.
  5. Walter Glannon & Gregory E. Kaebnick (forthcoming). James Lindemann Nelson is Professor. Hastings Center Report.
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  6. Walter Glannon (2014). Intervening in the Psychopath's Brain. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 35 (1):43-57.
    Psychopathy is a disorder involving personality and behavioral features associated with a high rate of violent aggression and recidivism. This paper explores potential psychopharmacological therapies to modulate dysfunctional neural pathways in psychopaths and reduce the incidence of their harmful behavior, as well as the ethical and legal implications of offering these therapies as an alternative to incarceration. It also considers whether forced psychopharmacological intervention in adults and children with psychopathic traits manifesting in violent behavior can be justified. More generally, the (...)
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  7. Walter Glannon (2014). James Stacey Taylor: Death, Posthumous Harm, and Bioethics. New York: Routledge, 2012. Bioethics 28 (3):155-156.
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  8. Walter Glannon (2014). The Limitations and Potential of Neuroimaging in the Criminal Law. Journal of Ethics 18 (2):153-170.
    Neuroimaging showing brain abnormalities is increasingly being introduced in criminal court proceedings to argue that a defendant could not control his behavior and should not be held responsible for it. But imaging has questionable probative value because it does not directly capture brain function or a defendant’s mental states at the time of a criminal act. Advanced techniques could transform imaging from a coarse-grained measure of correlations between brain states and behavior to a fine-grained measure of causal connections between them. (...)
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  9. W. Glannon (2013). Burdens of ANH Outweigh Benefits in the Minimally Conscious State. Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (9):551-552.
    In the case of the minimally conscious patient M, the English Court of Protection ruled that it would be unlawful to withdraw artificial nutrition and hydration (ANH) from her. The Court reasoned that the sanctity of life was the determining factor and that it would not be in M's best interests for ANH to be withdrawn. This paper argues that the Court's reasoning is flawed and that continued ANH was not in this patient's best interests and thus should have been (...)
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  10. Walter Glannon (2013). Obsessions, Compulsions, and Free Will. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 19 (4):333-337.
    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and other psychiatric disorders can interfere with a person’s capacity to control the nature of his mental states and how they issue in his decisions and actions. Insofar as this sort of control is identified with free will, and psychiatric disorders can impair this control, these disorders can impair free will. The will can be compromised by dysregulated neural networks that disable the mental mechanisms necessary to regulate thought, motivation, and action. Neural and mental dys-function result in (...)
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  11. Walter Glannon (2013). The Moral Insignificance of Death in Organ Donation. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 22 (2):192-202.
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  12. Nir Lipsman & Walter Glannon (2013). Brain, Mind and Machine: What Are the Implications of Deep Brain Stimulation for Perceptions of Personal Identity, Agency and Free Will? Bioethics 27 (9):465-470.
    Brain implants, such as Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS), which are designed to improve motor, mood and behavioural pathology, present unique challenges to our understanding of identity, agency and free will. This is because these devices can have visible effects on persons' physical and psychological properties yet are essentially undetectable when operating correctly. They can supplement and compensate for one's inherent abilities and faculties when they are compromised by neuropsychiatric disorders. Further, unlike talk therapy or pharmacological treatments, patients need not ‘do’ (...)
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  13. Walter Glannon (2012). Neuropsychological Aspects of Enhancing the Will. The Monist 95 (3):378-398.
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  14. Walter Glannon (2012). Review of T. M. Wilkinson, Ethics and the Acquisition of Organs. [REVIEW] Journal of Value Inquiry 46 (3):379-382.
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  15. L. Friedman Ross, Walter Glannon, Lawrence J. Gottlieb & ThistlethwaiteJr (2012). Different Standards Are Not Double Standards: All Elective Surgical Patients Are Not Alike. Journal of Clinical Ethics 23 (2):118.
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  16. W. Glannon (2011). The Philosophy of Death * by Steven Luper. Analysis 71 (3):601-603.
    (No abstract is available for this citation).
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  17. Walter Glannon (2011). Brain, Behavior, and Knowledge. Neuroethics 4 (3):191-194.
    In “Minds, Brains, and Norms,” Michael Pardo and Dennis Patterson claim that the idea that ‘you are your brain’ does not contribute to a plausible account of human behavior. I argue that they leave too little of the brain in their account of different types of behavior.
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  18. Walter Glannon (2011). Donation, Death, and Harm. American Journal of Bioethics 11 (8):48-49.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 11, Issue 8, Page 48-49, August 2011.
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  19. Walter Glannon (2011). Review of Martha J. Farah, Ed., Neuroethics: An Introduction with Readings. [REVIEW] Neuroethics 4 (3):263-265.
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  20. W. Glannon (2010). Afterword. In James J. Giordano & Bert Gordijn (eds.), Scientific and Philosophical Perspectives in Neuroethics. Cambridge University Press.
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  21. Walter Glannon (2010). Ben Bradley, Well-Being and Death. Journal of Value Inquiry 44 (1):107-111.
  22. Walter Glannon (2010). Consent to Deep Brain Stimulation for Neurological and Psychiatric Disorders. Journal of Clinical Ethics 21 (2):104.
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  23. Paul Dagg, Stephen A. Green, Sidney Bloch & Walter Glannon (2009). Analysis: John Has Hepatitis and Schizophrenia. Journal of Ethics in Mental Health 1 (1):7.
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  24. W. Glannon (2009). Stimulating Brains, Altering Minds. Journal of Medical Ethics 35 (5):289-292.
    Deep-brain stimulation has been used to treat advanced Parkinson disease and other neurological and psychiatric disorders that have not responded to other treatments. While deep-brain stimulation can modulate overactive or underactive regions of the brain and thereby improve motor function, it can also cause changes in a patient’s thought and personality. This paper discusses the trade-offs between the physiological benefit of this technique and the potential psychological harm.
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  25. Walter Glannon (2009). Free Riding and Organ Donation. Journal of Medical Ethics 35 (10):590-591.
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  26. Walter Glannon (2009). Neurodiversity. Journal of Ethics in Mental Health 2 (2):1.
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  27. Walter Glannon (2009). Our Brains Are Not Us. Bioethics 23 (6):321-329.
    Many neuroscientists have claimed that our minds are just a function of and thus reducible to our brains. I challenge neuroreductionism by arguing that the mind emerges from and is shaped by interaction among the brain, body, and environment. The mind is not located in the brain but is distributed among these three entities. I then explore the implications of the distributed mind for neuroethics.
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  28. M. L. S. Bette Anton, Laure Copel, Ruiping Fan, Joseph J. Fins, Walter Glannon & Richard V. Grazi (2008). David M. Adams, Ph. D., MLS (Law), is Professor, California State Polytechnic University in Pomona and Clinical Ethicist at Pomona Valley Hospital Medical Center. Akira Akabayashi, MD, Ph. D., is Professor in the Department of Biomedical Ethics at the School of Health Science and Nursing, University of Tokyo. [REVIEW] Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 17:251-253.
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  29. W. Glannon (2008). Underestimating the Risk in Living Kidney Donation. Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (3):127-128.
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  30. Walter Glannon (2008). Altering the Brain and Mind. Hastings Center Report 38 (4):pp. 46-47.
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  31. Walter Glannon (2008). Deep-Brain Stimulation for Depression. HEC Forum 20 (4):325-335.
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  32. Walter Glannon (2008). Moral Responsibility and the Psychopath. Neuroethics 1 (3):158-166.
    Psychopathy involves impaired capacity for prudential and moral reasoning due to impaired capacity for empathy, remorse, and sensitivity to fear-inducing stimuli. Brain abnormalities and genetic polymorphisms associated with these traits appear to justify the claim that psychopaths cannot be morally responsible for their behavior. Yet psychopaths are capable of instrumental reasoning in achieving their goals, which suggests that they have some capacity to respond to moral reasons against performing harmful acts and refrain from performing them. The cognitive and affective impairment (...)
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  33. Walter Glannon (2008). Neurostimulation and the Minimally Conscious State. Bioethics 22 (6):337–345.
    Neurostimulation to restore cognitive and physical functions is an innovative and promising technique for treating patients with severe brain injury that has resulted in a minimally conscious state (MCS). The technique may involve electrical stimulation of the central thalamus, which has extensive projections to the cerebral cortex. Yet it is unclear whether an improvement in neurological functions would result in a net benefit for these patients. Quality-of-life measurements would be necessary to determine whether any benefit of neurostimulation outweighed any harm (...)
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  34. Walter Glannon (2008). Psychopharmacological Enhancement. Neuroethics 1 (1):45-54.
    Many drugs have therapeutic off-label uses for which they were not originally designed. Some drugs designed to treat neuropsychiatric and other disorders may enhance certain normal cognitive and affective functions. Because the long-term effects of cognitive and affective enhancement are not known and may be harmful, a precautionary principle limiting its use seems warranted. As an expression of autonomy, though, competent individuals should be permitted to take cognition- and mood-enhancing agents. But they need to be aware of the risks in (...)
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  35. Walter Glannon (2008). Enhancing Evolution: The Ethical Case for Making Better People, by John Harris. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2007. 242 Pp. $28.95. [REVIEW] Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 17 (04):473-476.
    Readers are invited to contact Greg S. Loeben in writing at Midwestern University, Glendale Campus, Bioethics Program, 19555 N. 59th Ave., Glendale, AZ 85308 regarding books they would like to see reviewed or books they are interested in reviewing.
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  36. Walter Glannon (2008). Responsibility and Priority in Liver Transplantation. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 18 (01):23-.
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  37. Walter Glannon (2008). The Case Against Conscription of Cadaveric Organs for Transplantation. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 17 (03):330-336.
    In a recent set of papers, Aaron Spital has proposed conscription or routine recovery of cadaveric organs without consent as a way of ameliorating the severe shortage of organs for transplantation. Under the existing consent requirement, organs can be taken from the bodies of the deceased if they expressed a wish and intention to donate while alive. Organs may also be taken when families or other substitute decisionmakers decide on behalf of the deceased to allow organ procurement for the purpose (...)
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  38. Walter Glannon (2007). Persons, Metaphysics and Ethics. American Journal of Bioethics 7 (1):68-69.
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  39. Walter Glannon (2007). A Death Retold: Jesica Santillan, the Bungled Transplant, and Paradoxes of Medical Citizenship (Review). Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 50 (4):637-639.
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  40. W. Glannon (2006). Psychopharmacology and Memory. Journal of Medical Ethics 32 (2):74-78.
  41. W. Glannon (2006). Phase I Oncology Trials: Why the Therapeutic Misconception Will Not Go Away. Journal of Medical Ethics 32 (5):252-255.
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  42. Walter Glannon (2006). Neuroethics. Bioethics 20 (1):37–52.
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  43. Lainie Friedman Ross & Walter Glannon (2006). A Compounding of Errors: The Case of Bone Marrow Donation Between Non-Intimate Siblings. Journal of Clinical Ethics 17 (3):220.
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  44. Howard Brody, Yvonne Denier, Joseph J. Fins, Kimberly Garcher & Walter Glannon (2005). Bette Anton, MLS, is Head Librarian of the Optometry Library and Health Sciences Information Service. This Library Serves the University of California at Berkeley–University of California at San Francisco Joint Medical Program and the University of California at Berkeley School of Optometry. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 14:129-130.
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  45. W. Glannon (2005). Medicine Through the Novel: Lying Awake. Medical Humanities 31 (1):31-34.
    Narrative fiction can engage readers in generating imaginative recreations of the inner worlds of doctors and patients, which are largely inaccessible through typical clinical case analysis. Fiction about medicine can yield insight into patients’ subjective experience of illness and can highlight the need for an empathetic response from doctors to patients affected by illness. Mark Salzman’s novel, Lying Awake, invites us to reflect on social, psychological, and spiritual dimensions of neurological illness in particular and of the doctor/patient relationship in general.
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  46. Walter Glannon (ed.) (2005). Biomedical Ethics. Oxford University Press.
    Today, advances in medicine and biotechnology occur at a rapid pace and have a profound impact on our lives. Mechanical devices can sustain an injured person's life indefinitely. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans of the body and brain can reveal disorders before symptoms appear. Genetic testing of embryos can predict whether people will have diseases earlier or later in life. It may even become possible to clone human beings. These and other developments raise difficult ethical questions. (...)
     
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  47. Walter Glannon (2005). Neurobiology, Neuroimaging, and Free Will. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 29 (1):68-82.
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  48. Walter Glannon & Lainie Friedman Ross (2005). Motivation, Risk, and Benefit in Living Organ Donation: A Reply to Aaron Spital. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics: Cq: The International Journal of Healthcare Ethics Committees 14 (2):191.
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  49. Walter Glannon & Lainie Friedman Ross (2005). Response to “Intrafamilial Organ Donation Is Often an Altruistic Act” by Aaron Spital (CQ Vol 12, No 1) and “Donor Benefit Is the Key to Justified Living Organ Donation,” by Aaron Spital (CQ Vol 13, No 1): Motivation, Risk, and Benefit in Living Organ Donation: A Reply to Aaron Spital. [REVIEW] Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 14 (02):191-194.
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  50. Matti Hayry Chadwick & Walter Glannon (2004). Short Literature Notices. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 7:347-357.
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