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Walter Glannon [84]W. Glannon [17]Walter Peter Glannon [1]
  1.  27
    W. Glannon (2009). Stimulating Brains, Altering Minds. Journal of Medical Ethics 35 (5):289-292.
    Deep-brain stimulation has been used to treat advanced Parkinson disease and other neurological and psychiatric disorders that have not responded to other treatments. While deep-brain stimulation can modulate overactive or underactive regions of the brain and thereby improve motor function, it can also cause changes in a patient’s thought and personality. This paper discusses the trade-offs between the physiological benefit of this technique and the potential psychological harm.
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  2.  93
    Walter Glannon (2008). Psychopharmacological Enhancement. Neuroethics 1 (1):45-54.
    Many drugs have therapeutic off-label uses for which they were not originally designed. Some drugs designed to treat neuropsychiatric and other disorders may enhance certain normal cognitive and affective functions. Because the long-term effects of cognitive and affective enhancement are not known and may be harmful, a precautionary principle limiting its use seems warranted. As an expression of autonomy, though, competent individuals should be permitted to take cognition- and mood-enhancing agents. But they need to be aware of the risks in (...)
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  3.  87
    W. Glannon (2004). Transcendence and Healing. Medical Humanities 30 (2):70-73.
    Healing aims to restore the wholeness of persons by restoring the unity of mind and body disrupted by disease. Transcendence promotes healing by altering or cultivating beliefs that can modulate the body’s response to pain or make sense of pain. This in turn can produce an emotional response that enables people to cope with chronic or terminal illness. I explain transcendence in terms of a monistic rather than dualistic conception of mind and body, which supports the idea of medicine as (...)
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  4. Walter Glannon (2002). Depression as a Mind-Body Problem. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 9 (3):243-254.
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  5.  3
    W. Glannon (2014). Anaesthesia, Amnesia and Harm. Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (10):651-657.
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  6. Walter Glannon (2005). Neurobiology, Neuroimaging, and Free Will. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 29 (1):68-82.
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  7. Walter Glannon (2008). Moral Responsibility and the Psychopath. Neuroethics 1 (3):158-166.
    Psychopathy involves impaired capacity for prudential and moral reasoning due to impaired capacity for empathy, remorse, and sensitivity to fear-inducing stimuli. Brain abnormalities and genetic polymorphisms associated with these traits appear to justify the claim that psychopaths cannot be morally responsible for their behavior. Yet psychopaths are capable of instrumental reasoning in achieving their goals, which suggests that they have some capacity to respond to moral reasons against performing harmful acts and refrain from performing them. The cognitive and affective impairment (...)
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  8.  93
    Walter Glannon (2009). Our Brains Are Not Us. Bioethics 23 (6):321-329.
    Many neuroscientists have claimed that our minds are just a function of and thus reducible to our brains. I challenge neuroreductionism by arguing that the mind emerges from and is shaped by interaction among the brain, body, and environment. The mind is not located in the brain but is distributed among these three entities. I then explore the implications of the distributed mind for neuroethics.
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  9. Walter Glannon (2003). Key Concepts: Endophenotypes. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 10 (3):277-284.
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  10.  22
    Walter Glannon (2011). Donation, Death, and Harm. American Journal of Bioethics 11 (8):48-49.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 11, Issue 8, Page 48-49, August 2011.
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  11.  51
    Nir Lipsman & Walter Glannon (2013). Brain, Mind and Machine: What Are the Implications of Deep Brain Stimulation for Perceptions of Personal Identity, Agency and Free Will? Bioethics 27 (9):465-470.
    Brain implants, such as Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS), which are designed to improve motor, mood and behavioural pathology, present unique challenges to our understanding of identity, agency and free will. This is because these devices can have visible effects on persons' physical and psychological properties yet are essentially undetectable when operating correctly. They can supplement and compensate for one's inherent abilities and faculties when they are compromised by neuropsychiatric disorders. Further, unlike talk therapy or pharmacological treatments, patients need not ‘do’ (...)
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  12.  88
    Walter Glannon (2006). Neuroethics. Bioethics 20 (1):37–52.
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  13.  5
    Emily Bell, Eric Racine, Paula Chiasson, Maya Dufourcq-Brana, Laura B. Dunn, Joseph J. Fins, Paul J. Ford, Walter Glannon, Nir Lipsman, Mary Ellen Macdonald, Debra J. H. Mathews & Mary Pat Mcandrews (2014). Beyond Consent in Research. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 23 (3):361-368.
    Vulnerability is an important criterion to assess the ethical justification of the inclusion of participants in research trials. Currently, vulnerability is often understood as an attribute inherent to a participant by nature of a diagnosed condition. Accordingly, a common ethical concern relates to the participant’s decisionmaking capacity and ability to provide free and informed consent. We propose an expanded view of vulnerability that moves beyond a focus on consent and the intrinsic attributes of participants. We offer specific suggestions for how (...)
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  14.  4
    Walter Glannon (2011). Brain, Body, and Mind: Neuroethics with a Human Face. Oxford University Press.
    This book is a discussion of the most timely and contentious issues in the two branches of neuroethics: the neuroscience of ethics; and the ethics of neuroscience. Drawing upon recent work in psychiatry, neurology, and neurosurgery, it develops a phenomenologically inspired theory of neuroscience to explain the brain-mind relation. The idea that the mind is shaped not just by the brain but also by the body and how the human subject interacts with the environment has significant implications for free will, (...)
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  15.  8
    W. Glannon (2006). Psychopharmacology and Memory. Journal of Medical Ethics 32 (2):74-78.
    Psychotropic and other drugs can alter brain mechanisms regulating the formation, storage, and retrieval of different types of memory. These include “off label” uses of existing drugs and new drugs designed specifically to target the neural bases of memory. This paper discusses the use of beta-adrenergic antagonists to prevent or erase non-conscious pathological emotional memories in the amygdala. It also discusses the use of novel psychopharmacological agents to enhance long term semantic and short term working memory by altering storage and (...)
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  16.  7
    W. Glannon (2013). Burdens of ANH Outweigh Benefits in the Minimally Conscious State. Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (9):551-552.
    In the case of the minimally conscious patient M, the English Court of Protection ruled that it would be unlawful to withdraw artificial nutrition and hydration (ANH) from her. The Court reasoned that the sanctity of life was the determining factor and that it would not be in M's best interests for ANH to be withdrawn. This paper argues that the Court's reasoning is flawed and that continued ANH was not in this patient's best interests and thus should have been (...)
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  17.  39
    Walter Glannon (1998). Moral Responsibility and Personal Identity. American Philosophical Quarterly 35 (3):231 - 249.
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  18.  48
    Walter Glannon (2013). Obsessions, Compulsions, and Free Will. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 19 (4):333-337.
    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and other psychiatric disorders can interfere with a person’s capacity to control the nature of his mental states and how they issue in his decisions and actions. Insofar as this sort of control is identified with free will, and psychiatric disorders can impair this control, these disorders can impair free will. The will can be compromised by dysregulated neural networks that disable the mental mechanisms necessary to regulate thought, motivation, and action. Neural and mental dys-function result in (...)
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  19.  11
    W. Glannon (2003). Do the Sick Have a Right to Cadaveric Organs? Journal of Medical Ethics 29 (3):153-156.
    One way of increasing the supply of organs for transplantation is to adopt a policy giving the sick a right to cadaveric organs. Such a right would entail the coercive transfer of organs from the dead without their previous consent. Because this policy would violate individual autonomy and the special relation between humans and their bodies, it would be morally unjustifiable. Although a rights-based non-consensual model of salvaging cadaveric organs would be medically desirable, a communitarian-based consensual model would be a (...)
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  20.  7
    Walter Glannon & Lainie Friedman Ross (2002). Do Genetic Relationships Create Moral Obligations in Organ Transplantation? Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 11 (2):153-159.
    In 1999, a case was described on national television in which a woman had enlisted onto an international bone marrow registry with the altruistic desire to offer her bone marrow to some unidentified individual in need of a transplant. The potential donor then was notified that she was a compatible match with someone dying from leukemia and gladly donated her marrow, which cured the recipient of the disease. Years later, though, the recipient developed end-stage renal disease, a consequence of the (...)
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  21. Walter Glannon (2009). Neuroscience, Free Will and Responsibility. Journal of Ethics in Mental Health 4:1-6.
    Some cognitive neuroscientists and psychologists claim that our conscious mental states and actions can be explained entirely in terms of unconscious mechanical processes in the brain. This suggests that our belief in free will is an illusion and that we cannot be responsible for our actions. I argue that neuroscience as such does not threaten free and responsible agency. The real threat to free will is not normal brain function but brain dysfunction that impairs or undermines our capacity for agency.
     
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  22.  16
    Walter Glannon (2012). Neuropsychological Aspects of Enhancing the Will. The Monist 95 (3):378-398.
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  23.  50
    Walter Glannon (2008). The Case Against Conscription of Cadaveric Organs for Transplantation. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 17 (3):330-336.
    In a recent set of papers, Aaron Spital has proposed conscription or routine recovery of cadaveric organs without consent as a way of ameliorating the severe shortage of organs for transplantation. Under the existing consent requirement, organs can be taken from the bodies of the deceased if they expressed a wish and intention to donate while alive. Organs may also be taken when families or other substitute decisionmakers decide on behalf of the deceased to allow organ procurement for the purpose (...)
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  24.  2
    W. Glannon (2014). Taylor on Posthumous Organ Procurement. Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (9):637-638.
    In defending what he calls ‘full-blooded Epicureanism’, James Stacey Taylor argues that the dead cannot be harmed or wronged.1 This has implications for a range of bioethical issues pertaining to death, including posthumous organ procurement. Taylor claims that respecting the autonomy of persons requires that their desires regarding the treatment of their postmortem bodies be given due consideration while these persons are alive. It is not obvious what this means in practical terms, though Taylor says that respect for autonomy requires (...)
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  25.  49
    Walter Glannon (1998). Responsibility, Alcoholism, and Liver Transplantation. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 23 (1):31 – 49.
    Many believe that it is morally wrong to give lower priority for a liver transplant to alcoholics with end-stage liver disease than to patients whose disease is not alcohol-related. Presumably, alcoholism is a disease that results from factors beyond one's control and therefore one cannot be causally or morally responsible for alcoholism or the liver failure that results from it. Moreover, giving lower priority to alcoholics unfairly singles them out for the moral vice of heavy drinking. I argue that the (...)
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  26.  89
    Walter Glannon (2001). Genes and Future People: Philosophical Issues in Human Genetics. Westview Press.
    Advances in genetic technology in general and medical genetics in particular will enable us to intervene in the process of human biological development which extends from zygotes and embryos to people. This will allow us to control to a great extent the identities and the length and quality of the lives of people who already exist, as well as those we bring into existence in the near and distant future. Genes and Future People explores two general philosophical questions, one metaphysical, (...)
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  27.  14
    Walter Glannon (1997). Psychopathy and Responsibility. Journal of Applied Philosophy 14 (3):263–275.
  28.  1
    Walter Glannon (2016). Review of Joseph J. Fins, Rights Come to Mind: Brain Injury, Ethics, and the Struggle for Consciousness. [REVIEW] American Journal of Bioethics 16 (6):6-7.
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  29.  4
    W. Glannon (2006). Phase I Oncology Trials: Why the Therapeutic Misconception Will Not Go Away. Journal of Medical Ethics 32 (5):252-255.
    In many cases, the “therapeutic misconception” may be an unavoidable part of the imperfect process of recruitment and consent in medical researchPaul Appelbaum, Loren Roth, and Charles Lidz coined the term “therapeutic misconception” in 1982.1 They described it as the misconception that participating in research is the same as receiving individualised treatment from a physician. It referred to the research subject’s failure to appreciate that the aim of research is to obtain scientific knowledge, and that any benefit to the subject (...)
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  30.  39
    Walter Glannon (2009). Responsibility and Priority in Liver Transplantation. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 18 (1):23.
    In a provocative 1991 paper, Alvin Moss and Mark Siegler argued that it may be fair to give individuals with alcohol-related end-stage liver disease lower priority for a liver transplant than those who develop end-stage liver disease from other factors. Like other organs, there is a substantial gap between the available livers for transplantation and the number of people who need liver transplants. Yet, unlike those with end-stage renal disease, who can survive for some time on dialysis before receiving a (...)
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  31.  26
    Walter Glannon (2002). Extending the Human Life Span. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 27 (3):339 – 354.
    Research into the mechanisms of aging has suggested the possibility of extending the human life span. But there may be evolutionary biological reasons for senescence and the limits of the cell cycle that explain the infirmities of aging and the eventual demise of all human organisms. Genetic manipulation of the mechanisms of aging could over many generations alter the course of natural selection and shift the majority of deleterious mutations in humans from later to earlier stages of life. This could (...)
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  32.  27
    Walter Glannon (2002). Indentity, Prudential Concern, and Extended Lives. Bioethics 16 (3):266–283.
  33.  45
    Walter Glannon (2008). Neurostimulation and the Minimally Conscious State. Bioethics 22 (6):337–345.
    Neurostimulation to restore cognitive and physical functions is an innovative and promising technique for treating patients with severe brain injury that has resulted in a minimally conscious state (MCS). The technique may involve electrical stimulation of the central thalamus, which has extensive projections to the cerebral cortex. Yet it is unclear whether an improvement in neurological functions would result in a net benefit for these patients. Quality-of-life measurements would be necessary to determine whether any benefit of neurostimulation outweighed any harm (...)
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  34.  50
    Walter Glannon (2011). Review of Martha J. Farah, Ed., Neuroethics: An Introduction with Readings. [REVIEW] Neuroethics 4 (3):263-265.
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  35.  12
    Walter Glannon (1997). Morality, Mortality. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 27 (3):407-421.
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  36.  41
    Walter Glannon (2008). Deep-Brain Stimulation for Depression. HEC Forum 20 (4):325-335.
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  37.  41
    Walter Glannon (2002). The Psychology and Physiology of Depression. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 9 (3):265-269.
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  38.  54
    Walter Glannon (2011). Brain, Behavior, and Knowledge. Neuroethics 4 (3):191-194.
    In “Minds, Brains, and Norms,” Michael Pardo and Dennis Patterson claim that the idea that ‘you are your brain’ does not contribute to a plausible account of human behavior. I argue that they leave too little of the brain in their account of different types of behavior.
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  39.  38
    Walter Glannon (2001). Persons, Lives, and Posthumous Harms. Journal of Social Philosophy 32 (2):127–142.
  40.  25
    Walter Glannon (1995). Equality, Priority, and Numbers. Social Theory and Practice 21 (3):427-455.
  41.  54
    Walter Glannon (2010). Ben Bradley, Well-Being and Death. Journal of Value Inquiry 44 (1):107-111.
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  42.  23
    Walter Glannon (1998). Genes, Embryos, and Future People. Bioethics 12 (3):187–211.
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  43. Walter Glannon (ed.) (2004). Biomedical Ethics. Oxford University Press.
    Today, advances in medicine and biotechnology occur at a rapid pace and have a profound impact on our lives. Mechanical devices can sustain an injured person's life indefinitely. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans of the body and brain can reveal disorders before symptoms appear. Genetic testing of embryos can predict whether people will have diseases earlier or later in life. It may even become possible to clone human beings. These and other developments raise difficult ethical questions. (...)
     
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  44.  35
    Walter Glannon (1994). Temporal Asymmetry, Life, and Death. American Philosophical Quarterly 31 (3):235 - 244.
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  45.  15
    Walter Glannon (2009). Free Riding and Organ Donation. Journal of Medical Ethics 35 (10):590-591.
    With the gap between the number of transplantable organs and the number of people needing transplants widening, many have argued for moving from an opt-in to an opt-out system of deceased organ donation. In the first system, individuals must register their willingness to become donors after they die. In the second system, it is assumed that individuals wish to become donors unless they have registered an objection to donation. Opting out has also been described as presumed consent. Spain has had (...)
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  46.  39
    W. Glannon (2011). The Philosophy of Death * by Steven Luper. Analysis 71 (3):601-603.
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  47.  17
    Walter Glannon (2014). Intervening in the Psychopath's Brain. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 35 (1):43-57.
    Psychopathy is a disorder involving personality and behavioral features associated with a high rate of violent aggression and recidivism. This paper explores potential psychopharmacological therapies to modulate dysfunctional neural pathways in psychopaths and reduce the incidence of their harmful behavior, as well as the ethical and legal implications of offering these therapies as an alternative to incarceration. It also considers whether forced psychopharmacological intervention in adults and children with psychopathic traits manifesting in violent behavior can be justified. More generally, the (...)
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  48.  2
    W. Glannon (2002). Are Doctors Altruistic? Journal of Medical Ethics 28 (2):68-69.
    There is a growing belief in the US that medicine is an altruistic profession, and that physicians display altruism in their daily work. We argue that one of the most fundamental features of medical professionalism is a fiduciary responsibility to patients, which implies a duty or obligation to act in patients' best medical interests. The term that best captures this sense of obligation is “beneficence”, which contrasts with “altruism” because the latter act is supererogatory and is beyond obligation. On the (...)
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  49.  17
    W. Glannon (2008). Underestimating the Risk in Living Kidney Donation. Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (3):127-128.
    Living donor kidney transplantation has increased significantly in the past 10 years. Currently it accounts for 41% of all kidney transplants in the USA.1 While the percentage is lower in the United Kingdom and other European countries, the number of living compared with cadaveric kidney donors will probably continue to increase globally. Mortality associated with surgery on live donors is low, thanks largely to the success of laparoscopic nephrectomy. Kidney transplantation from a living donor is preferable to that from a (...)
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  50. Walter Glannon (2009). Neurodiversity. Journal of Ethics in Mental Health 2 (2):1.
    The neurological and psychological traits that regulate our thought and behavior fall along a spectrum that extends from the normal to the pathological, from traits that enable us to perform mental and physical functions to traits that interfere with these functions. Yet many people have a constellation of both normal and pathological mental traits. Some even have traits associated with exceptional intellectual or artistic ability despite being diagnosed as having a neurological or psychiatric disorder. These cases raise medical, ethical and (...)
     
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