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  1. W. Matthews Grant (2014). Hugh J. McCann: Creation and the Sovereignty of God. [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 75 (2):179-182.
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  2. W. Matthews Grant (2012). Divine Simplicity, Contingent Truths, and Extrinsic Models of Divine Knowing. Faith and Philosophy 29 (3):254-274.
    A well-known objection to divine simplicity holds that the doctrine is incompatible with God’s contingent knowledge. I set out the objection and reject two problematic solutions. I then argue that the objection is best answered by adopting an “extrinsic model of divine knowing” according to which God’s contingent knowledge, which varies across worlds, does not involve any intrinsic variation in God. Solutions along these lines have been suggested by others. This paper advances the discussion by developing and offering partial defenses (...)
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  3. W. Matthews Grant (2010). Can a Libertarian Hold That Our Free Acts Are Caused by God? Faith and Philosophy 27 (1):22-44.
    According to prevailing opinion, if a creaturely act is caused by God, then it cannot be free in the libertarian sense. I argue to the contrary. I distinguish intrinsic and extrinsic models of divine causal agency. I then show that, given the extrinsic model, there is no reason one holding that our free acts are caused by God could not also hold a libertarian account of human freedom. It follows that a libertarian account of human freedom is consistent with God’s (...)
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  4. W. Matthews Grant (2009). Aquinas on How God Causes the Act of Sin Without Causing Sin Itself. The Thomist 73 (3):455-496.
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  5. W. Matthews Grant (2007). Must a Cause Be Really Related to its Effect? The Analogy Between Divine and Libertarian Agent Causality. Religious Studies 43 (1):1-23.
    According to a classical teaching, God is not really related to creatures even by virtue of creating them. Some have objected that this teaching makes unintelligible the claim that God causally accounts for the universe, since God would be the same whether the universe existed or not. I defend the classical teaching, showing how the doctrine is implied by a popular cosmological argument, showing that the objection to it would also rule out libertarian agent causality, and showing that the objection (...)
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  6. W. Matthews Grant (2006). Scholastic Meditations. International Philosophical Quarterly 46 (3):379-381.
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  7. W. Matthews Grant (2006). The Science of God: An Introduction to Scientific Theology. Review of Metaphysics 60 (1):166-168.
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  8. W. Matthews Grant (2004). Atheism, Morality, and Meaning. International Philosophical Quarterly 44 (1):128-130.
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  9. W. Matthews Grant (2003). Aquinas, Divine Simplicity, and Divine Freedom. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 77:129-144.
    Aquinas maintains that, although God created the universe, he could have created another or simply refrained from creating altogether. That Aquinas believesin divine free choice is uncontroversial. Yet doubts have been raised as to whether Thomas is entitled to this belief, given his claims concerning divine simplicity.According to simplicity, there is no potentiality in God, nor is there a distinction in God between God’s willing, His essence, and His necessary being. On the surface, it appears that these claims leave no (...)
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  10. W. Matthews Grant (2001). Aquinas Among Libertarians and Compatibilists. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 75:221-235.
    Aquinas teaches that human acts are caused by God. Assuming that such causation entails theological determinism, philosophers with libertarian intuitions tend either to read around Aquinas’s teaching on the relation of divine causality and human action, or to reject that teaching altogether. Unfortunately, the arguments most often used by Aquinas and his contemporary defenders to show that his teaching is compatible with human freedom fail to address thelibertarian’s main concerns. In part one of this essay, I consider these arguments and (...)
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  11. W. Matthews Grant (2000). Counterfactuals of Freedom, Future Contingents, and the Grounding Objection to Middle Knowledge. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 74:307-323.
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  12. W. Matthews Grant (2000). Providence and the Problem of Evil. International Philosophical Quarterly 40 (1):115-117.
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