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  1. Warren Schmaus & Tekla M. Schmaus (2014). The Wrong People for the Job? Metascience 23 (3):607-611.
    The “demands of the day” to which the title refers concern the problems associated with doing ethical anthropology in the twenty-first century. Rabinow and Stavrianakis intend to draw lessons for anthropologists from their experiences as participant observers attempting to collaborate with scientists on analyzing ethical issues in biological research. But they come across as naive and inexperienced about engaging scientists in ethical discourse and recount an unhappy tale illustrating exactly the sorts of things anthropologists should not do, without deriving any (...)
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  2. Warren Schmaus (2011). Science and the Social Contract in Renouvier. Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 1 (1):73-100.
    Renouvier criticized Comte’s positivist philosophy of science and proposed a social contract approach for dealing with normative questions in philosophy of science as well as moral philosophy. Renouvier then questioned Kant’s distinction between practical and theoretical reason and argued that judgments concerning epistemic warrant must be freely made in the same way that moral judgments are made. What counts as scientific knowledge depends on a consensus within the scientific community that develops over time through critical inquiry in much the same (...)
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  3. Warren Schmaus (2010). Durkheim, Jamesian Pragmatism and the Normativity of Truth. History of the Human Sciences 23 (5):1-16.
    In his lectures on pragmatism presented in the academic year 1913—14 at the Sorbonne, Durkheim argued that James’s pragmatist theory of truth, due to its emphasis on individual satisfaction, was unable to account for the obligatory, necessary and impersonal character of truth. But for Durkheim to make this charge is only to raise the question whether he himself could account for the morally obligatory or normative character of truth. Although rejecting individualism may be necessary for explaining the existence of norms, (...)
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  4. Warren Schmaus (2010). Review of C. Mantzavinos, Philosophy of the Social Sciences: Philosophical Theory and Scientific Practice. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2010 (6).
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  5. Warren Schmaus (2009). Writing the History of the Mind: Philosophy and Science in France, 1900 to 1960s. [REVIEW] Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 100:667-668.
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  6. Warren Schmaus (2008). A New Way of Thinking About Social Location in Science. Science and Education 17 (10):1127-1137.
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  7. Warren Schmaus (2008). Not Your Doktorvater's Logical Positivism. Metascience 17 (3):489-493.
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  8. Warren Schmaus (2008). Rescuing Auguste Comte From the Philosophy of History. History and Theory 47 (2):291–301.
  9. Warren Schmaus, Two Concepts of Social Situatedness in Science.
    Although standpoint theorists tend to characterize a scientist’s social situation in terms of her position in a hierarchy of power within the larger society, her social situation could also be characterized in terms of the degree to which she is integrated into the scientific community. The latter concept of social location may prove helpful in explaining a scientist’s potential for contributing to the growth of knowledge. It may also provide an independent measure of marginalization that makes it possible to ascertain (...)
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  10. Warren Schmaus (2007). Renouvier and the Method of Hypothesis. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 38 (1):132-148.
    Renouvier was among the first philosophers in France to break with the nineteenth-century inductivist tradition and defend the use of hypotheses in science. Earlier in the century, the humanistically-educated eclectic spiritualist philosophers who dominated French academic life had followed Reid in proscribing the use of hypotheses. Renouvier, who was educated in the sciences, took up the Comtean positivist alternative and developed it further. He began by defending hypotheses that anticipate laws governing the phenomena, but then eventually adopted a more liberal (...)
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  11. Warren Schmaus (2006). La Nature de la Société: Organicisme Et Sciences Sociales au XIXe Siècle. [REVIEW] Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 97:563-564.
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  12. Warren Schmaus (2006). Rethinking Durkheim and His Tradition. Cambridge University Press.
    This book offers a reassessment of the work of Emile Durkheim in the context of a French philosophical tradition that had seriously misinterpreted Kant by interpreting his theory of the categories as psychological faculties. Durkheim's sociological theory of the categories, as revealed by Warren Schmaus, is an attempt to provide an alternative way of understanding Kant. For Durkheim the categories are necessary conditions for human society. The concepts of causality, space and time underpin the moral rules and obligations that make (...)
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  13. W. Schmaus (2005). Book Review: What's So Social About Social Knowledge? [REVIEW] Philosophy of the Social Sciences 35 (1):98-125.
    Although Longino and Solomon are interested in what social conditions will produce better science, neither philosopher has provided a sufficient analysis of the social character of science. For instance, neither considers the social character of discovery as well as that of justification, or that an individual scientist’s social status and social relations may be important for understanding her role in both processes. The contributors to Schmitt’s volume are interested in whether the terms that refer to social entities can be reduced (...)
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  14. Warren Schmaus (2005). Evolutionary and Neuroscience Approaches to the Study of Cognition. Philosophy of Science 72 (5):675-686.
  15. Warren Schmaus (2005). Review of Lawrence E. Cahoone, Cultural Revolutions: Reason Versus Culture in Philosophy, Politics, and Jihad. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2005 (8).
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  16. Warren Schmaus (2005). The Value of Values. Metascience 14 (2):265-268.
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  17. Marcel Weber, Warren Schmaus, Heather A. Jamniczky, Gry Oftedal, Robert C. Bishop, Axel Gelfert, Mathias Frisch, Daniel Parker, Mario Castagnino & Olimpia Lombardi (2005). 1. Preface Preface (Pp. I-Ii). Philosophy of Science 72 (5).
     
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  18. Warren Schmaus (2003). Is Durkheim the Enemy of Evolutionary Psychology? Philosophy of the Social Sciences 33 (1):25-52.
    an exemplar of an approach that takes the human mind to be largely the product of social and cultural factors with negligible contributions from biology. The author argues that on the contrary, his sociological theory of the categories is compatible with the possibility of innate cognitive capacities, taking causal cognition as his example. Whether and to what extent there are such innate capacities is a question for research in the cognitive neurosciences. The extent to which these innate capacities can then (...)
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  19. Warren Schmaus (2003). Kant's Reception in France: Theories of the Categories in Academic Philosophy, Psychology, and Social Science. Perspectives on Science 11 (1):3-34.
    : It has been said that Kant's critical philosophy made it impossible to pursue either the Cartesian rationalist or the Lockean empiricist program of providing a foundation for the sciences (e.g., Guyer 1992). This claim does not hold true for much of nineteenth century French philosophy, especially the eclectic spiritualist tradition that begins with Victor Cousin (1792-1867) and Pierre Maine de Biran (1766-1824) and continues through Paul Janet (1823-99). This tradition assimilated Kant's transcendental apperception of the unity of experience to (...)
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  20. Warren Schmaus (2002). Philosophy Fettered? A Review of Science Unfettered: A Philosophical Study in Sociohistorical Ontology by J. E. McGuire and Barbara Tuchanska. Social Epistemology 16 (4):383 – 390.
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  21. Cassandra L. Pinnick & Warren Schmaus (2001). Changing Conceptions of the Philosophy of Science. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 15 (2):127 – 131.
    (2001). Changing conceptions of the philosophy of science. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science: Vol. 15, No. 2, pp. 127-131. doi: 10.1080/02698590120058997.
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  22. David Turnbull, Henry Krips, Val Dusek, Steve Fuller, Alan Sokal, Jean Bricmont, Alan Frost, Alan Chalmers, Anna Salleh, Alfred I. Tauber, Yvonne Luxford, Nicolaas Rupke, Steven French, Peter G. Brown, Hugh LaFollette, Peter Machamer, Nicolas Rasmussen, Andy J. Miller, Marya Schechtman, Ross S. West, John Forge, David Oldroyd, Nancy Demand, Darrin W. Belousek, Warren Schmaus, Sungook Hong, Rachel A. Ankeny, Peter Anstey, Jeremy Butterfield & Harshi Gunawardena (2000). Clarity, Charity and Criticism, Wit, Wisdom and Worldliness: Avoiding Intellectual Impositions. [REVIEW] Metascience 9 (3):347-498.
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  23. Warren Schmaus (1999). Functionalism and the Meaning of Social Facts. Philosophy of Science 66 (3):323.
    This paper defends a social functionalist interpretation, modeled on psychological functionalism, of the meanings of social facts. Social functionalism provides a better explanation of the possibility of interpreting other cultures than approaches that identify the meanings of social facts with either mental states or behavior. I support this claim through a functionalist reinterpretation of sociological accounts of the categories that identify them with their collective representations. Taking the category of causality as my example, I show that if we define it (...)
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  24. Warren Schmaus (1997). Essays in the History and Philosophy of Science by Pierre Duhem; Roger Ariew; Peter Barker. [REVIEW] Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 88:524-525.
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  25. Warren Schmaus (1996). The Empirical Character of Methodological Rules. Philosophy of Science 63 (3):106.
    Critics of Laudan's normative naturalism have questioned whether methodological rules can be regarded as empirical hypotheses about relations between means and ends. Drawing on Laudan's defense that rules of method are contingent on assumptions about the world, I argue that even if such rules can be shown to be analytic in principle (Kaiser 1991), in practice the warrant for such rules will be empirical. Laudan's naturalism, however, acquires normative force only by construing both methods and epistemic goals as instrumental to (...)
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  26. W. Schmaus (1995). Review of Gerald Maxwell and Pamela Oliver's The Critical Mass in Collective Action: A Micro-Social Theory, and Margaret Gilbert's On Social Facts. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 11:203-203.
     
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  27. Warren Schmaus (1995). No Title Available: Reviews. Economics and Philosophy 11 (1):203-208.
    The Critical Mass in Collective Action: A Micro-Social Theory, Marwell Gerald and Oliver PamelaOn Social Facts, Gilbert Margaret.
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  28. Warren Schmaus (1995). Review of Gerald Maxwell and Pamela Olivers' "The Critical Mass in Collective Action: A Micro-Social Theory". [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 11:203.
     
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  29. Warren Schmaus (1995). The Critical Mass in Collective Action: A Micro-Social Theory, Marwell Gerald and Oliver Pamela. Cambridge University Press, 1993, Xii + 206 Pages and On Social Facts, Gilbert Margaret. Princeton University Press, 1989, X + 521 Pages. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 11 (01):203-.
  30. Warren Schmaus (1994). Durkheim's Philosophy of Science and the Sociology of Knowledge Creating an Intellectual Niche. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  31. W. Schmaus (1993). Book Reviews : Helen E. Longino, Science as Social Knowledge: Values and Objectivity in Scientific Inquiry. Princeton University Press, Princeton, NJ, 1990. Pp. Xii, 262, $35.00 (Cloth), $13.95 (Paper. [REVIEW] Philosophy of the Social Sciences 23 (4):562-566.
  32. Warren Schmaus (1993). John Oulton Wisdom, 1908-1993. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 23 (2):147.
     
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  33. Warren Schmaus (1993). "Science as Social Knowledge: Values and Objectivity in Scientific Inquiry", by Helen E. Longino. [REVIEW] Philosophy of the Social Sciences 23 (4):562.
     
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  34. Sonia Ryang, Warren Schmaus, Steven I. Miller, Carl Matheson, Harold Brown, Govindan Parayil, Steven Yearley & Stephen Turner (1992). Taylor Ic Francis. London and Washington. Dc 0269-172bc1992) 6: 1-#. Social Epistemology 6:102.
     
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  35. Warren Schmaus (1992). Research Programs as Intellectual Niches. Social Epistemology 6 (1):13 – 22.
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  36. Warren Schmaus (1992). Sociology and Hacking's Trousers. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1992:167 - 173.
    For Hacking, the word "real", like the sexist expression "wear the trousers", takes its meaning from its negative uses. In this essay, I criticize Hacking's reasons for believing that the objects of study of the social sciences are not real. First I argue that the realism issue in the social sciences concerns not unobservable entities but systems of social classification. I then argue that Hacking's social science nominalism derives from his considering social groups in isolation from the entire social system. (...)
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  37. Warren Schmaus, Ullica Segerstrale & Douglas Jesseph (1992). A Manifesto. Social Epistemology 6 (3):243 – 265.
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  38. Warren Schmaus, Ullica Segerstrale & Douglas Jesseph (1992). Words of Welcome to Our New Allies. Social Epistemology 6 (3):315 – 320.
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  39. W. Schmaus (1991). Book Reviews : Steve Fuller, Social Epistemology. Indiana University Press, Bloomington/ Indianapolis, 1988. Pp. Xv, 316, US$22.00. [REVIEW] Philosophy of the Social Sciences 21 (1):121-125.
  40. Warren Schmaus (1991). "Social Epistemology", by Steve Fuller. [REVIEW] Philosophy of the Social Sciences 21 (1):121.
     
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  41. Warren Schmaus (1991). Whither Social Epistemology? A Reply to Fuller. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 21 (2):196-202.
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  42. Warren Schmaus (1989). Theories of Explanation by Joseph C. Pitt. [REVIEW] Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 80:356-356.
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  43. Warren Schmaus (1988). Fact and Method: Explanation, Confirmation, and Reality in the Natural and Social Sciences by Richard W. Miller. [REVIEW] Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 79:492-493.
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  44. Warren Schmaus (1988). Social Science, Epistemology, and the Problem of Relativism: Reply to Meja and Stehr. Social Epistemology 2 (3):273 – 274.
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  45. Warren Schmaus (1986). Modern Science and Human Values by William W. Lowrance. [REVIEW] Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 77:127-128.
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  46. Warreb Schmaus (1985). Hypotheses and Historical Analysis in Durkheim's Sociological Methodology: A Comtean Tradition. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 16 (1):1-30.
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  47. Warren Schmaus (1985). Reasons, Causes, and the 'Strong Programme' in the Sociology of Knowledge. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 15 (2):189-196.
  48. Warren Schmaus (1983). In Defense of Historical Laws. Philosophy of Science 50 (1):146-150.
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  49. Warren Schmaus (1982). A Reappraisal Of Comte's Three-State Law. History and Theory 21 (2):248-266.
    Comte's three-state law concerns the historical development of our methods of cognitive inquiry. Comte believes he can defend his three-state law either by :,rational proofs" based upon our knowledge of the human mind or upon 'historical verifications." Comte then uses the three-state law of scientific progress to argue for the existence of industrial and multistate political laws of progress. Here Comte strays from his positivism. He attributes a kind of causal efficacy to scientific progress which leads him to look for (...)
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