Search results for 'W. Y. Evans-Wentz' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Paramahansa Yogananda (1950). Autobiography of a Yogi. New York, Rider.score: 204.0
    WITH A PREFACE BY W. Y. Evans-Wentz M.A. D.Litt. D.Sc..
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  2. W. Y. Evans-Wentz (1968). Tibetan Yoga and Secret Doctrines. New York [Etc.],Oxford U.P..score: 198.0
    General introduction.--The supreme path of discipleship: the precepts of the gurus.--The nirvānic path: the yoga of the great symbol.--The path of knowledge: the yoga of the six doctrines.--The path of transference: the yoga of consciousness-transference.--The path of the mystic sacrifice: the yoga of subduing the lower self.--The path of the five wisdoms: the yoga of the long hūm.--The path of the transcendental wisdom: the yoga of the voidness.
     
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  3. M. Potts, J. L. Verheijde, M. Y. Rady & D. W. Evans (2010). Normative Consent and Presumed Consent for Organ Donation: A Critique. Journal of Medical Ethics 36 (8):498-499.score: 85.5
    Ben Saunders claims that actual consent is not necessary for organ donation due to ‘normative consent’, a concept he borrows from David Estlund. Combining normative consent with Peter Singer's ‘greater moral evil principle’, Saunders argues that it is immoral for an individual to refuse consent to donate his or her organs. If a presumed consent policy were thus adopted, it would be morally legitimate to remove organs from individuals whose wishes concerning donation are not known. This paper disputes Saunders' arguments. (...)
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  4. Michael Potts, Joseph L. Verheijde, Mohamed Y. Rady & David W. Evans (2013). The Ethics of Limiting Informed Debate: Censorship of Select Medical Publications in the Interest of Organ Transplantation. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 38 (6):625-638.score: 85.5
    Recently, several articles in the scholarly literature on medical ethics proclaim the need for “responsible scholarship” in the debate over the proper criteria for death, in which “responsible scholarship” is defined in terms of support for current neurological criteria for death. In a recent article, James M. DuBois is concerned that academic critiques of current death criteria create unnecessary doubt about the moral acceptability of organ donation, which may affect the public’s willingness to donate. Thus he calls for a closing (...)
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