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William J. Wainwright [71]P. Wainwright [15]William Wainwright [14]Paul Wainwright [13]
Geoffrey Wainwright [11]G. A. Wainwright [9]Milton Wainwright [7]Steven P. Wainwright [3]

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  1. P. Wainwright (2005). The Nature of Self and How It is Experienced Within and Beyond the Health Care Setting. Medical Humanities 31 (2):57-59.
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  2. William J. Wainwright (ed.) (2009). Philosophy of Religion. Routledge.
    The past forty years or so have witnessed a renaissance in the philosophy of religion. New tools (modal logic, probability theory, and so on) and new historical research have prompted many thinkers to take a fresh look at old topics (God’s existence, the problem of evil, faith and reason, and the like). Moreover, sophisticated examinations of contentious new issues, such as the problem of religious diversity or the role of emotions and other non-evidential factors in shaping rationally held religious beliefs, (...)
     
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  3. Geoffrey Wainwright (forthcoming). Book Review: Ascension and Ecclesia: On the Significance of the Doctrine of the Ascension for Ecclesiology and Christian Cosmology. [REVIEW] Interpretation 55 (3):330-330.
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  4.  83
    P. Wainwright (2002). Non Heart Beating Organ Transplantation--Medical and Ethical Issues in Procurement: R Herdman, J Potts. National Academy Press, 1997, Pound15.95, Pp 92. ISBN 0-309-06424-. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Ethics 28 (2):131-131.
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  5.  44
    Paul Wainwright (2000). Ethics: The Heart of Health Care David Seedhouse, Chichester, Wiley, 1998, 232 Pages,£ 15.99. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Ethics 26 (2):143-144.
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  6.  4
    William J. Wainwright (1995). Reason and the Heart: A Prolegomenon to a Critique of Passional Reason. Cornell University Press.
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  7.  5
    Valerie Wainwright (2016). On Being Tough-Minded: Sense and Sensibility and the Moral Psychology of "Helping". Philosophy and Literature 39 (1):195-211.
    It is fortunate for the community in which she lives that one of the things about which Elinor Dashwood cares a great deal is the social duty of “general civility”—the practice, in Hume’s words, of “gentle usage.” The heroine of Sense and Sensibility is respectful and considerate toward others, whether or not these are dearly loved family members or comparative strangers. According to Karen Stohr, throughout the novel, “Elinor is the exemplar of moderation, propriety and moral rectitude,” and the reader’s (...)
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  8.  20
    Milton Wainwright (1997). Extreme Pleomorphism and the Bacterial Life Cycle: A Forgotten Controversy. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 40 (3):407-414.
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  9.  39
    William J. Wainwright (2011). Obstacles to Divine Revelation. Faith and Philosophy 28 (3):348-354.
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  10.  2
    Stephen Pattison & Paul Wainwright (2010). Is the 2008 NMC Code Ethical? Nursing Ethics 17 (1):9-18.
    In 2008 the United Kingdom Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) published the latest version of its code of conduct (The code: standards of conduct, performance and ethics for nurses and midwives). The new version marked a significant change of style in the Code compared with previous versions. There has been considerable controversy and the accrual of an extensive body of literature over the years in the UK and Europe criticizing nursing codes of ethics and questioning their ethical standing and their (...)
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  11.  4
    Frances Rapport & Paul Wainwright (2006). Phenomenology as a Paradigm of Movement. Nursing Inquiry 13 (3):228-236.
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  12.  39
    William J. Wainwright (2010). In Defense of Non-Natural Theistic Realism. Faith and Philosophy 27 (4):457-463.
    Eric Wielenberg and I agree that basic moral truths are necessarily true. But Wielenberg thinks that, because these truths are necessary, they require no explanation, and I do not: some basic moral truths are not self-explanatory. I argue that Wielenberg’s reasons for thinking that my justification of that claim is inadequate are ultimately unconvincing.
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  13.  17
    Paul Wainwright & Ann Gallagher (2008). On Different Types of Dignity in Nursing Care: A Critique of Nordenfelt. Nursing Philosophy 9 (1):46-54.
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  14.  41
    William Wainwright, Concepts of God.
    The object of attitudes valorized in the major religious traditions is typically regarded as maximally great. Conceptions of maximal greatness differ but theists believe that a maximally great reality must be a maximally great person or God. Theists largely agree that a maximally great person would be omnipresent, omnipotent, omniscient, and all good. They do not agree on a number of God's other attributes, however. We will illustrate this by examining the debate over God's impassibility in western theism and a (...)
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  15.  3
    P. Wainwright (2002). Consent to Open Label Extension Studies: Some Ethical Issues. Journal of Medical Ethics 28 (6):373-376.
    A frequent feature of pharmaceutical research is the open label extension study, in which patients participating in double blind placebo controlled trials of new medications are invited, on completion of the initial trial, to take the study drug for some further period. Patients are openly given the active substance at this stage, regardless of their assignment in the initial trial. Investigators are typically reluctant to unblind the patients’ assignment at the point of entry into the open label phase, on the (...)
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  16. William J. Wainwright (2006). Religion and Morality. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 59 (3):175-178.
     
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  17.  6
    William J. Wainwright (1984). Mysticism: A Study of Its Nature, Cognitive Value and Moral Implications. Philosophy East and West 34 (3):337-339.
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  18. William J. Wainwright (2002). Jonathan Edwards and the Hiddenness of God. In Daniel Howard-Snyder & Paul K. Moser (eds.), Divine Hiddenness: New Essays. Cambridge University Press 98--119.
     
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  19.  27
    William Wainwright (2010). Jonathan Edwards, God, and “Particular Minds”. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 68 (1):201-213.
    Although philosophical theologians have sometimes claimed that human beings are necessarily dependent on God, few have developed the idea with any precision. Jonathan Edwards is a notable exception, providing a detailed and often novel account of humanity’s essential ontological, moral, and soteriological dependence on God.
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  20.  20
    William Wainwright (2009). Two (or Maybe One and a Half) Cheers for Perfect Being Theology. Philo 12 (2):228-251.
    In a series of influential articles published in the 1980s, Thomas Morris argued that the most promising approach to many issues in the philosophy of religion is “perfect being theology.” A philosopher who adopts it begins by construing God as a maximally perfect being and then fills the conception in by using his or her modal intuitions and intuitions concerning what properties are and are not perfections. While I am sympathetic with Morris’s program, two aspects seem problematic. More justification is (...)
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  21.  10
    Steven P. Wainwright & Angus Forbes (2000). Philosophical Problems with Social Research on Health Inequalities. Health Care Analysis 8 (3):259-277.
    This paper offers a realist critique of socialresearch on health inequalities. A conspectus of thefield of health inequalities research identifies twomain research approaches: the positivist quantitativesurvey and the interpretivist qualitative `casestudy'. We argue that both approaches suffer fromserious philosophical limitations. We suggest that aturn to realism offers a productive `third way' bothfor the development of health inequality research inparticular and for the social scientific understandingof the complexities of the social world in general.
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  22.  22
    William Wainwright, Monotheism. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  23.  3
    P. Wainwright, A. Gallagher, H. Tompsett & C. Atkins (2010). The Use of Vignettes Within a Delphi Exercise: A Useful Approach in Empirical Ethics? Journal of Medical Ethics 36 (11):656-660.
    There has been an increase in recent years in the use of empirical methods in healthcare ethics. Appeals to empirical data cannot answer moral questions, but insights into the knowledge, attitudes, experience, preferences and practice of interested parties can play an important part in the development of healthcare ethics. In particular, while we may establish a general ethical principle to provide explanatory and normative guidance for healthcare professionals, the interpretation and application of such general principles to actual practice still requires (...)
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  24.  6
    Alan Cribb, Steven Wainwright, Clare Williams, Bobbie Farsides & Mike Michael (2008). Towards the Applied: The Construction of Ethical Positions in Stem Cell Translational Research. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 11 (3):351-361.
    This paper aims to make an empirically informed analytical contribution to the development of a more socially embedded bioethics. Drawing upon 10 interviews with cutting edge stem cell researchers (5 scientists and 5 clinicians) it explores and illustrates the ways in which the role positions of translational researchers are shaped by the ‘normative structures’ of science and medicine respectively and in combination. The empirical data is used to illuminate three overlapping themes of ethical relevance: what matters in stem cell research, (...)
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  25.  18
    William Wainwright, Jonathan Edwards. Faith and Philosophy.
    Jonathan Edwards (1703–1758) is widely acknowledged to be America's most important and original philosophical theologian. His work as a whole is an expression of two themes — the absolute sovereignty of God and the beauty of God's holiness. The first is articulated in Edwards' defense of theological determinism, in a doctrine of occasionalism, and in his insistence that physical objects are only collections of sensible “ideas” while finite minds are mere assemblages of “thoughts” or “perceptions.” As the only real cause (...)
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  26.  59
    William J. Wainwright (1978). The Ontological Argument, Question-Begging, and Professor Rowe. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 9 (4):254 - 257.
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  27.  17
    William J. Wainwright (2005). Rowe on God's Freedom and God's Grace. Philo 8 (1):12-22.
    Rowe argues that if for every good world there is a better, then God is not morally perfect since no matter what world God were to create he could have done better than he did. I contend that Rowe’s argument doesn’t do justice to the role grace plays in the theist’s doctrine of creation, and respond to five new criticisms of my position that Rowe offers in Can God be Free?
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  28.  14
    Guy Wainwright (1988). The Maurice Baring Special Issue. The Chesterton Review 14 (4):644-644.
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  29.  16
    Pamela Sue Anderson, Hent DeVries, David Ray Griffin, William Hasker, Fergus Kerr, John Macquarrie, Adrian Peperzak, Philip L. Quinn, William J. Wainwright & Keith Ward (2005). Part One: Articles. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 58:207-214.
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  30.  50
    William J. Wainwright (1979). Causality, Necessity and the Cosmological Argument. Philosophical Studies 36 (3):261 - 270.
    I distinguish between a causeless being, An essentially causeless being, And a logically necessary being, And argue that only a logically necessary being can provide an adequate answer to the question, "why do contingent and dependent beings exist?" I also argue that recent attempts to show that if a being is essentially causeless, It is logically necessary, Are unsound.
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  31.  16
    Geoffrey Wainwright (1991). The Doctrine of the Trinity Where the Church Stands or Falls. Interpretation 45 (2):117-132.
    In the struggle over traditional trinitarian doctrine, criticism from feminist, deistic, and religionist quarters can stimulate the churches in their revival of this soteriologically vital pattern of the Christian faith.
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  32.  24
    William Wainwright (1990). Jonathan Edwards and the Sense of the Heart. Faith and Philosophy 7 (1):43-62.
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  33.  49
    William J. Wainwright (2001). Theological Determinism and the Problem of Evil: Are Arminians Any Better Off? International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 50 (1/3):81-96.
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  34.  14
    William J. Wainwright (1989). Philosophy and Miracle. Faith and Philosophy 6 (1):110-113.
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  35.  28
    William J. Wainwright (1995). Theism, Metaphysics, and D. Z. Phillips. Topoi 14 (2):87-93.
    Section I argues that theistic religions incorporate metaphysical systems and that these systems are explanatory. Section II defends these claims against D. Z. Phillips ''s objections to the epistemic realism and correspondence theory of truth which they imply. I conclude by raising questions about the status of Phillips ''s own project.
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  36. William J. Wainwright (1984). Natural Explanations and Religious Experience. In J. Houston (ed.), Is It Reasonable to Believe in God? Handsel Press
     
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  37. William J. Wainwright (2000). Religious Experience and Religious Pluralism. In Philip L. Quinn & Kevin Meeker (eds.), The Philosophical Challenge of Religious Diversity. Oxford University Press
     
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  38.  21
    William J. Wainwright (2003). Gale on Religious Experience. Philo 6 (1):114-131.
    Richard Gale has mounted the most effective attack on religious experience’s cognitive credentials in recent decades. This article explains why I am nonetheless not persuaded by it. I argue that: Contrary to Gale, mystical experiences do take an objective accusative, and are therefore presumptively cognitive. The tests for the veridicality of religious experience are more like those for sense experiences than Gale allows. Gale’s “big” or “deep” disanalogy is not as devastating as he thinks. Gale’s critique of my and Alston’s (...)
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  39.  10
    Jane Thomas & Paul Wainwright (1996). Community Nurses and Health Promotion: Ethical and Political Perspectives. Nursing Ethics 3 (2):97-107.
    This paper brings together ideas from two perspectives on ethics and health promotion. A discussion of the ethical dimension of the health promotion practice of community nurses is set in the wider context of health policy, with particular reference to health gain and individual responsibility. It is widely held that nurses have a key role to play in health promotion and that this is particularly the case for nurses working in primary health care. This assumption is reinforced by policy documents (...)
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  40.  17
    William J. Wainwright (1982). Mysticism and Sense Perception. In Steven M. Cahn & David Shatz (eds.), Religious Studies. Oxford University Press 257 - 278.
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  41.  6
    William J. Wainwright (1973). Mysticism and Sense Perception: WILLIAM J. WAINWRIGHT. Religious Studies 9 (3):257-278.
    In this paper I propose to examine the cognitive status of mystical experience. There are, I think, three distinct but overlapping sorts of religious experience. In the first place, there are two kinds of mystical experience. The extrovertive or nature mystic identifies himself with a world which is both transfigured and one. The introvertive mystic withdraws from the world and, after stripping the mind of concepts and images, experiences union with something which can be described as an undifferentiated unity. Introvertive (...)
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  42.  15
    William J. Wainwright (1979). Augustine on God's Simplicity. New Scholasticism 53 (1):118-123.
  43.  32
    William J. Wainwright (1975). Christian Theism and the Free Will Defense: A Problem. [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 6 (4):243 - 250.
    Theism maintains that God is a moralagent. Classical Christian theism also maintains that God is unable tosin. The latter claim is entailed by the proposition that the being whois God is essentially God, and this proposition is one which would beendorsed by all or most classical theologians. It would thus appearthat the claim that God is unable to sin is an important, if notfundamental, part of classical Christian theism. It follows that, at acrucial point, classical Christian theism is incompatible with (...)
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  44.  4
    Geoffrey Wainwright (1985). The Praise of Godin the Theological Reflection of the Church. Interpretation 39 (1):34-45.
    Reflective theology expounds the liturgical tradition of the church, draws on it for motivation and material, and shares responsibility for keeping it faithful.
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  45.  18
    Milton Wainwright (2007). The First Miracle Drugs: How the Sulfa Drugs Transformed Medicine (Review). Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 50 (4):639-642.
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  46.  22
    William J. Wainwright (1968). Freedom and Omnipotence. Noûs 2 (3):293-301.
  47. John Locke & A. Wainwright (1991). A paraphrase and notes on the Epistles of St Paul. Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 181 (1):104-105.
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  48.  5
    William J. Wainwright (1978). Unihorses and the Ontological Argument. Sophia 17 (3):27-32.
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  49.  16
    William J. Wainwright (1994). Mystic Union. Faith and Philosophy 11 (3):488-495.
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  50.  15
    William J. Wainwright (1988). Religious Experience. Faith and Philosophy 5 (2):208-213.
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