Search results for 'Waking' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Margaret Macdonald (1953). Sleeping and Waking. Mind 62 (April):202-215.score: 15.0
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  2. M. J. Baker (1954). Sleeping and Waking. Mind 63 (October):539-543.score: 15.0
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  3. W. von Leyden (1956). Sleeping and Waking. Mind 65 (April):241-245.score: 15.0
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  4. C. E. Henry (1941). Electroencephalographic Individual Differences and Their Constancy: II. During Waking. Journal of Experimental Psychology 29 (3):236.score: 15.0
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  5. Harold Grier McCurdy (1948). An Experimental Study of Waking Postural Suggestion. Journal of Experimental Psychology 38 (3):250.score: 15.0
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  6. Everett F. Patten, St Clair A. Switzer & Clark L. Hull (1932). Habituation, Retention, and Perseveration Characteristics of Direct Waking Suggestion. Journal of Experimental Psychology 15 (5):539.score: 15.0
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  7. Mircea Steriade (1978). Cortical Long-Axoned Cells and Putative Interneurons During the Sleep-Waking Cycle. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 1 (3):465.score: 15.0
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  8. Stephen R. L. Clark (1983). Waking-Up: A Neglected Model for the Afterlife. Inquiry 26 (2):209 – 230.score: 12.0
    An inquiry into the possibility that life?after?death be understood as waking from a shared dream into the real world. Attempts to outlaw the possibility that ?really? we are, e.g., vat?brains are shown to lead to unwelcome, anti?realist conclusions about either the world or consciousness. The unsatisfactory nature of empirically observable (Humean) causal connections suggests that real causes may be found beyond the world of our present experience. Though such a story cannot now be proved to be true, we are (...)
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  9. Robert P. Vertes (2005). Sleep is for Rest, Waking Consciousness is for Learning and Memory – of Any Kind. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (1):86-87.score: 12.0
    Although considerable attention has been paid to the possible involvement of sleep in memory processing, there is no substantial evidence for it. Walker describes a phenomenon of consolidation-based enhancement (CBE), whereby performance on select procedural tasks improves with overnight sleep; that is, without additional practice on the tasks. CBE, however, appears restricted to a few tasks, and even with these tasks CBE is not confined to sleep but also occurs during wakefulness. Sleep serves no unique role in this process. At (...)
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  10. Ernest Hartmann (2000). The Waking-to-Dreaming Continuum and the Effects of Emotion. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (6):947-950.score: 12.0
    The three-dimensional “AIM model” proposed by Hobson et al. is imaginative. However, many kinds of data suggest that the “dimensions” are not orthogonal, but closely correlated. An alternative view is presented in which mental functioning is considered as a continuum, or a group of closely linked continua, running from focused waking activity at one end, to dreaming at the other. The effect of emotional state is increasingly evident towards the dreaming end of the continuum. [Hobson et al.; Nielsen; Solms].
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  11. Edward F. Pace-Schott (2005). Complex Hallucinations in Waking Suggest Mechanisms of Dream Construction. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (6):771-772.score: 12.0
    Waking hallucinations suggest mechanisms of dream initiation and maintenance. Visual association cortex activation, yielding poorly attended-to, visually ambiguous dream environments, suggests conditions favoring hallucinosis. Attentional and visual systems, coactivated during sleep, may generate imagery that is inserted into virtual environments. Internally consistent dreaming may evolve from successive, contextually evoked images. Fluctuating arousal and context-evoked imagery may help explain dream features.
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  12. David Kahn & J. Allan Hobson (2003). State Dependence of Character Perception: Implausibility Differences in Dreaming and Waking Consciousness. Journal of Consciousness Studies 10 (3):57-68.score: 11.0
  13. Erin J. Wamsley (2013). Dreaming, Waking Conscious Experience, and the Resting Brain: Report of Subjective Experience as a Tool in the Cognitive Neurosciences. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 10.0
    Even when we are ostensibly doing “nothing” – as during states of rest, sleep, and reverie – the brain continues to process information. In resting wakefulness, the mind generates thoughts, plans for the future, and imagines fictitious scenarios. In sleep, when the demands of sensory input are reduced, our experience turns to the thoughts and images we call “dreaming”. Far from being a meaningless distraction, the content of these subjective experiences provides an important and unique source of information about the (...)
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  14. J. A. J. Drewitt (1911). On the Distinction Between Waking and Dreaming. Mind 20 (77):67-73.score: 9.0
  15. David Kahn & J. Allan Hobson (2005). State-Dependent Thinking: A Comparison of Waking and Dreaming Thought. Consciousness and Cognition 14 (3):429-438.score: 9.0
  16. Tracey L. Kahan & Stephen P. LaBerge (2011). Dreaming and Waking: Similarities and Differences Revisited. Consciousness and Cognition 20 (3):494-514.score: 9.0
  17. B. E. Jones (1998). The Neural Basis of Consciousness Across the Sleep-Waking Cycle. In H. Jasper, L. Descarries, V. Castellucci & S. Rossignol (eds.), Consciousness: At the Frontiers of Neuroscience. Lippincott-Raven.score: 9.0
  18. Sue Llewellyn (2011). If Waking and Dreaming Consciousness Became de-Differentiated, Would Schizophrenia Result? Consciousness and Cognition 20 (4):1059-1083.score: 9.0
  19. R. J. Broughton (1982). Human Consciousness and Sleep/Waking Rhythms: A Review and Some Neuropsychological Considerations. Journal of Clinical Neuropsychology 4:193-218.score: 9.0
  20. Claude Gottesmann (2005). Waking Hallucinations Could Correspond to a Mild Form of Dreaming Sleep Stage Hallucinatory Activity. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (6):766-767.score: 9.0
    There are strong resemblances between the neurobiological characteristics of hallucinations occurring in the particular case of schizophrenia and the hallucinatory activity observed during the rapid-eye-movement (dreaming) sleep stage: the same prefrontal dorsolateral deactivation; forebrain disconnectivity and disinhibition; sensory deprivation; and acetylcholine, monoamine, and glutamate modifications.
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  21. Ursula Voss, Inka Tuin, Karin Schermelleh-Engel & Allan Hobson (2011). Waking and Dreaming: Related but Structurally Independent. Dream Reports of Congenitally Paraplegic and Deaf-Mute Persons. Consciousness and Cognition 20 (3):673-687.score: 9.0
  22. D. Pare & R. Llinas (1995). Conscious and Pre-Conscious Processes as Seen From the Standpoint of Sleep-Waking Cycle Neurophysiology. Neuropsychologia 33:1155-1168.score: 9.0
  23. Stevan Harnad, Waking OA's “Slumbering Giant”: The University's Mandate To Mandate Open Access.score: 9.0
    SUMMARY: Universities (the universal research-providers) as well as research funders (public and private) are beginning to make it part of their mandates to ensure not only that researchers conduct and publish peer-reviewed research (“publish or perish”), but that they also make it available online, free for all. This is called Open Access (OA), and it maximizes the uptake, impact and progress of research by making it accessible to all potential users worldwide, not just those whose universities can afford to subscribe (...)
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  24. Valdas Noreika (2011). Dreaming and Waking Experiences in Schizophrenia: How Should the (Dis)Continuity Hypotheses Be Approached Empirically? Consciousness and Cognition 20 (2):349-352.score: 9.0
  25. R. M. Yost Jr & Donald Kalish (1955). Miss MacDonald on Sleeping and Waking. Philosophical Quarterly 5 (19):109 - 124.score: 9.0
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  26. Stephen R. L. Clark (1991). Taylor's Waking Dream: No One's Reply. Inquiry 34 (2):195 – 215.score: 9.0
    Taylor recognizes the problems posed by the ideals of disengaged reason and the affirmation of ?ordinary life? for unproblematic commitment to other ideals of universal justice and the like. His picture of ?the modern identity? neglects too much of present importance and he is too disdainful of Platonic realism to offer a convincing solution. The romantic expressivism that he seeks to re?establish as an important moral resource can only avoid destructive effects if it is taken in its original and Platonic (...)
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  27. Rom Harré (2001). Waking to Wonder. International Studies in Philosophy 33 (2):139-141.score: 9.0
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  28. Russell Wahl & Jonathan Westphal (1992). Descartes, Leibniz and Berkeley on Whether We Can Dream Marks of the Waking State. Studia Leibnitiana 24 (2):177-181.score: 9.0
  29. Bernard J. Baars (1995). Surprisingly Small Subcortical Structures Are Needed for the State of Waking Consciousness, While Cortical Projection Areas Seem to Provide Perceptual Contents of Consciousness. Consciousness and Cognition 4 (2):159-62.score: 9.0
  30. E. Solomonova, T. Nielsen, P. Stenstrom, V. Simard, E. Frantova & D. DonDeri (2008). Sensed Presence as a Correlate of Sleep Paralysis Distress, Social Anxiety and Waking State Social Imagery. Consciousness and Cognition 17 (1):49-63.score: 9.0
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  31. Joshua C. Gregory (1923). Memory, Forgetfulness, and Mistakes of Recognition in Waking and Dreaming. The Monist 33 (1):15-32.score: 9.0
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  32. Tracey L. Kahan, Stephen LaBerge, Lynne Levitan & Philip Zimbardo (1997). Similarities and Differences Between Dreaming and Waking Cognition: An Exploratory Study. Consciousness and Cognition 6 (1):132-147.score: 9.0
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  33. M. Schredl (2003). Continuity Between Waking Activities and Dream Activities. Consciousness and Cognition 12 (2):298-308.score: 9.0
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  34. David A. Givner (1978). A Time for Waking. Southern Journal of Philosophy 16 (1):641-648.score: 9.0
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  35. Gordon C. F. Bearn (1997). Waking to Wonder: Wittgenstein's Existential Investigations. State University of New York Press.score: 9.0
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  36. Peter Beilharz (1989). Martin Walker, The Waking Giant: The Soviet Union Under Gorbachev (Abacus, 1988). Thesis Eleven 22 (1):143-144.score: 9.0
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  37. G. Berlucchi (1978). Sleep and Waking and Two Populations of Neurons. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 1 (3):486.score: 9.0
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  38. David R. Cerbone (1998). Gordon CF Bearn, Waking to Wonder: Wittgenstein's Existential Investigations Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 18 (1):3-5.score: 9.0
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  39. Allan Combs & Stanley Krippner (1998). Dream Sleep and Waking Reality: A Dynamical View. In Stuart R. Hameroff, Alfred W. Kaszniak & A. C. Scott (eds.), Toward a Science of Consciousness II. MIT Press.score: 9.0
  40. Craig Cox (1992). Is Business Waking Up? Business Ethics 6 (1):20-22.score: 9.0
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  41. John Dominic Crossan (1978). Waking the Bible Biblical Hermeneutic and Literary Imagination. Interpretation 32 (3):269-285.score: 9.0
    An important feature of contemporary biblical studies is the movement of many interpreters in a direction that leads from historical to literary criticism and then from classical to structural literary criticism.
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  42. David Feinstein, Ann Mortifee & K. Krippner (1998). Waking to the Rhythm of a New Myth. World Futures 52:187-238.score: 9.0
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  43. David Gallop (1971). Dreaming and Waking in Plato. In John Peter Anton, George L. Kustas & Anthony Preus (eds.), Essays in Ancient Greek Philosophy. State University of New York Press. 5--187.score: 9.0
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  44. Steven Geisz (2011). Saṃsāra in a Coffee Cup : Self, Suffering, and the Karma of Waking Up. In Scott F. Parker & Michael W. Austin (eds.), Coffee - Philosophy for Everyone: Grounds for Debate. Wiley-Blackwell.score: 9.0
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  45. George D. Greenia (2014). Vincent Barletta, Mark L. Bajus, and Cici Malik, Eds. And Transs., Dreams of Waking: An Anthology of Iberian Lyric Poetry, 1400–1700. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2013. Paper. Pp. 432; 3 Black-and-White Figures and 3 Tables. $25. ISBN: 9780226011165. [REVIEW] Speculum 89 (1):159-161.score: 9.0
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  46. Allan Hobson (2004). A Model for Madness? Dream Consciousness: Our Understanding of the Neurobiology of Sleep Offers Insight Into Abnormalities in the Waking Brain. Nature 430 (6995):21.score: 9.0
  47. J. Allan Hobson, Edward F. Pace-Schott & Robert Stickgold (2000). Consciousness: Its Vicissitudes in Waking and Sleep. In Michael S. Gazzaniga (ed.), The New Cognitive Neurosciences: 2nd Edition. Mit Press.score: 9.0
  48. R. Stickgold & J. Allan Hobson (1995). The Conscious State Paradigm: A Neurocognitive Approach to Waking, Sleeping, and Dreaming. In Michael S. Gazzaniga (ed.), The Cognitive Neurosciences. Mit Press.score: 9.0
  49. J. Allan Hobson (1998). The Conscious State Paradigm: A Neuropsychological Analysis of Waking, Sleeping, and Dreaming. In Stuart R. Hameroff, Alfred W. Kaszniak & A. C. Scott (eds.), Toward a Science of Consciousness II. MIT Press. 2--473.score: 9.0
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