Search results for 'Waking' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Margaret Macdonald (1953). Sleeping and Waking. Mind 62 (April):202-215.
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  2. Mircea Steriade (1978). Cortical Long-Axoned Cells and Putative Interneurons During the Sleep-Waking Cycle. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 1 (3):465.
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  3.  34
    W. von Leyden (1956). Sleeping and Waking. Mind 65 (April):241-245.
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  4.  25
    M. J. Baker (1954). Sleeping and Waking. Mind 63 (October):539-543.
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  5.  2
    Everett F. Patten, St Clair A. Switzer & Clark L. Hull (1932). Habituation, Retention, and Perseveration Characteristics of Direct Waking Suggestion. Journal of Experimental Psychology 15 (5):539.
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  6.  1
    Harold Grier McCurdy (1948). An Experimental Study of Waking Postural Suggestion. Journal of Experimental Psychology 38 (3):250.
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  7. C. E. Henry (1941). Electroencephalographic Individual Differences and Their Constancy: II. During Waking. Journal of Experimental Psychology 29 (3):236.
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  8.  74
    Gregory M. Nixon (forthcoming). Luminescent Physicalism, A Book Review of Evan Thompson's *Waking, Dreaming, Being*. [REVIEW] Journal of Consciousness Studies.
    This is a fine book by an extraordinary author whose literary followers have awaited a definitive statement of his views on consciousness since his participation in the important book on biological autopoiesis, The Embodied Mind (Varela, Thompson, & Rosch, 1991) and his recent neurophenomenology of biological systems, Mind in Life (2007). In the latter book, Thompson demonstrated the continuity of life and mind, whereas in this book he uses neurophenomenology as well as erudite renditions of Buddhist philosophy and a good (...)
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  9. Evan Thompson & Stephen Batchelor (2014). Waking, Dreaming, Being: Self and Consciousness in Neuroscience, Meditation, and Philosophy. Cup.
    A renowned philosopher of the mind, also known for his groundbreaking work on Buddhism and cognitive science, Evan Thompson combines the latest neuroscience research on sleep, dreaming, and meditation with Indian and Western philosophy of the mind, casting new light on the self and its relation to the brain. Thompson shows how the self is a changing process, not a static thing. When we are awake we identify with our body, but if we let our mind wander or daydream, we (...)
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  10.  5
    Jennifer M. Windt (2016). Dreaming, Imagining, and First-Person Methods in Philosophy: Commentary on Evan Thompson's Waking, Dreaming, Being. Philosophy East and West 66 (3):959-981.
    Evan’s book is in many ways an exercise in remapping. The first is suggested by the book’s title. Waking, Dreaming, Being challenges existing ways of mapping the conceptual relationship between conscious states across the sleep-wake cycle. The idea that waking and dreaming are not discrete states but can interpenetrate each other—that, to use Evan’s words, they “aren’t opposed but flow into and out of [one] an other” —is a central theme running through the book. If Evan is correct, (...)
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  11.  11
    M. Schredl (2003). Continuity Between Waking Activities and Dream Activities. Consciousness and Cognition 12 (2):298-308.
    Empirical studies largely support the continuity hypothesis of dreaming. Despite of previous research efforts, the exact formulation of the continuity hypothesis remains vague. The present paper focuses on two aspects: the differential incorporation rate of different waking-life activities and the magnitude of which interindividual differences in waking-life activities are reflected in corresponding differences in dream content. Using a correlational design, a positive, non-zero correlation coefficient will support the continuity hypothesis. Although many researchers stress the importance of emotional involvement (...)
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  12.  28
    Ursula Voss, Inka Tuin, Karin Schermelleh-Engel & Allan Hobson (2011). Waking and Dreaming: Related but Structurally Independent. Dream Reports of Congenitally Paraplegic and Deaf-Mute Persons. Consciousness and Cognition 20 (3):673-687.
    Models of dream analysis either assume a continuum of waking and dreaming or the existence of two dissociated realities. Both approaches rely on different methodology. Whereas continuity models are based on content analysis, discontinuity models use a structural approach. In our study, we applied both methods to test specific hypotheses about continuity or discontinuity. We contrasted dream reports of congenitally deaf-mute and congenitally paraplegic individuals with those of non-handicapped controls. Continuity theory would predict that either the deficit itself or (...)
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  13.  6
    Jana Speth, Trevor A. Harley & Clemens Speth (2016). Auditory Verbal Experience and Agency in Waking, Sleep Onset, REM, and Non‐REM Sleep. Cognitive Science 40 (5).
    We present one of the first quantitative studies on auditory verbal experiences and auditory verbal agency voices or characters”) in healthy participants across states of consciousness. Tools of quantitative linguistic analysis were used to measure participants’ implicit knowledge of auditory verbal experiences and auditory verbal agencies, displayed in mentation reports from four different states. Analysis was conducted on a total of 569 mentation reports from rapid eye movement sleep, non-REM sleep, sleep onset, and waking. Physiology was controlled with the (...)
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  14.  56
    Tracey L. Kahan & Stephen P. LaBerge (2011). Dreaming and Waking: Similarities and Differences Revisited. Consciousness and Cognition 20 (3):494-514.
    Dreaming is often characterized as lacking high-order cognitive skills. In two studies, we test the alternative hypothesis that the dreaming mind is highly similar to the waking mind. Multiple experience samples were obtained from late-night REM sleep and waking, following a systematic protocol described in Kahan . Results indicated that reported dreaming and waking experiences are surprisingly similar in their cognitive and sensory qualities. Concurrently, ratings of dreaming and waking experiences were markedly different on questions of (...)
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  15.  2
    John D. Dunne (2016). Comments on Waking, Dreaming, Being by Evan Thompson. Philosophy East and West 66 (3):934-942.
    Evan Thompson’s Waking, Dreaming, Being is an outstanding work that richly deserves the widespread praise that it is receiving. The book exhibits exquisite balance between various poles: science and philosophy, “East” and “West,” the accessible and the specialized, the physical and the emergent, and so on. It is also a remarkably readable book, and since academic literature is littered with many unreadable must-read tomes, I am grateful for the change of pace. In short, those who have not yet read (...)
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  16.  3
    Evan Thompson (2016). Précis of Waking, Dreaming, Being: Self and Consciousness in Neuroscience, Meditation, and Philosophy. Philosophy East and West 66 (3):927-933.
    The central idea of Waking, Dreaming, Being is that the self is a process, not a thing or an entity.1 The self isn’t something outside experience, hidden either in the brain or in some immaterial realm. It is an experiential process that is subject to constant change. We enact a self in the process of awareness, and this self comes and goes depending on how we are aware.When we’re awake and occupied with some manual task, we enact a bodily (...)
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  17.  29
    Sue Llewellyn (2011). If Waking and Dreaming Consciousness Became de-Differentiated, Would Schizophrenia Result? Consciousness and Cognition 20 (4):1059-1083.
    If both waking and dreaming consciousness are functional, their de-differentiation would be doubly detrimental. Differentiation between waking and dreaming is achieved through neuromodulation. During dreaming, without external sensory data and with mesolimbic dopaminergic input, hyper-cholinergic input almost totally suppresses the aminergic system. During waking, with sensory gates open, aminergic modulation inhibits cholinergic and mesocortical dopaminergic suppresses mesolimbic. These neuromodulatory systems are reciprocally interactive and self-organizing. As a consequence of neuromodulatory reciprocity, phenomenologically, the self and the world that (...)
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  18.  22
    Tracey L. Kahan, Stephen LaBerge, Lynne Levitan & Philip Zimbardo (1997). Similarities and Differences Between Dreaming and Waking Cognition: An Exploratory Study. Consciousness and Cognition 6 (1):132-147.
    Thirty-eight “practiced” dreamers and 50 “novice” dreamers completed questionnaires assessing the cognitive, metacognitive, and emotional qualities of recent waking and dreaming experiences. The present findings suggest that dreaming cognition is more similar to waking cognition than previously assumed and that the differences between dreaming and waking cognition are more quantitative than qualitative. Results from the two studies were generally consistent, indicating that high-order cognition during dreaming is not restricted to individuals practiced in dream recall or self-observation. None (...)
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  19.  2
    Tracey L. Kahan & Kieran T. Sullivan (2012). Assessing Metacognitive Skills in Waking and Sleep: A Psychometric Analysis of the Metacognitive, Affective, Cognitive Experience (MACE) Questionnaire. Consciousness and Cognition 21 (1):340-352.
    The Metacognitive, Affective, Cognitive Experience questionnaire was designed to assess metacognition across sleep and waking . The present research evaluates the psychometric properties of the MACE. Data from two recent studies were used to assess the inter-item consistency, test–retest reliability, and factorial, convergent, and discriminant validity of the MACE. Results show that the MACE is a reliable measure with good construct validity. Exploratory factor analyses revealed one self-regulation and two monitoring factors. One monitoring factor emphasized monitoring internal conditions; the (...)
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  20.  1
    Owen Flanagan (2016). Does Yoga Induce Metaphysical Hallucinations?: Interdisciplinarity at the Edge: Comments on Evan Thompson's Waking, Dreaming, Being. Philosophy East and West 66 (3):952-958.
    Waking, Dreaming, Being is an unusual book in many ways. I mention two. First, in some ways it is a memoir. Few philosophers started as a child doing the sort of philosophy that they did as a grown-up. Evan did. Evan grew up in the intellectually fertile world of the Lindisfarne Association, the collaborative of scientists, artists, ecologists, and contemplatives founded by his father, William Irwin Thompson, a polymath, whom I had the pleasure of meeting in 2004 at the (...)
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  21.  1
    Jay L. Garfield (2016). Reflections on Reflectivity: Comments on Evan Thompson's Waking, Dreaming, Being. Philosophy East and West 66 (3):943-951.
    Evan Thompson has written a marvelous book. Waking, Dreaming, Being blends intellectual autobiography, phenomenology, cognitive science, studies in Buddhist and Vedānta philosophy, and creative metaphilosophy in an exploration of what it is to be a person, of the nature of consciousness, and of the relation of contemplative to scientific method in the understanding of human life. I have learned a great deal from it, and the community of philosophers and cognitive scientists will be reading and discussing it for some (...)
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  22.  12
    E. Solomonova, T. Nielsen, P. Stenstrom, V. Simard, E. Frantova & D. DonDeri (2008). Sensed Presence as a Correlate of Sleep Paralysis Distress, Social Anxiety and Waking State Social Imagery. Consciousness and Cognition 17 (1):49-63.
    Isolated sleep paralysis is a common parasomnia characterized by an inability to move or speak and often accompanied by hallucinations of a sensed presence nearby. Recent research has linked ISP, and sensed presence more particularly, with social anxiety and other psychopathologies. The present study used a large sample of respondents to an internet questionnaire to test whether these associations are due to a general personality factor, affect distress, which is implicated in nightmare suffering and hypothesized to involve dysfunctional social imagery (...)
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  23.  8
    Valdas Noreika (2011). Dreaming and Waking Experiences in Schizophrenia: How Should the (Dis)Continuity Hypotheses Be Approached Empirically? Consciousness and Cognition 20 (2):349-352.
    A number of differences between the dreams of schizophrenia patients and those of healthy participants have been linked to changes in waking life that schizophrenia may cause. This way, the “continuity hypothesis” has become a standard way to relate dreaming and waking experiences in schizophrenia. Nevertheless, some of the findings in dream literature are not compatible with the continuity hypothesis and suggest some other ways how dream content and waking experiences could interact. Conceptually, the continuity hypothesis could (...)
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  24.  8
    David Kahn & J. Allan Hobson (2003). State Dependence of Character Perception: Implausibility Differences in Dreaming and Waking Consciousness. Journal of Consciousness Studies 10 (3):57-68.
    Dreaming consciousness can be quite different from waking consciousness and this difference must depend upon the underlying neurobiology. Our approach is to infer the underlying brain basis for this difference by studying dream reports and comparing them with waking. In this study we investigated mentation during dreaming by asking subjects to provide us with dream reports and by asking them to create a dream log. In the dream log, the subjects recorded all implausibility, illogicality or inappropriateness of character (...)
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  25.  31
    Stephen R. L. Clark (1983). Waking-Up: A Neglected Model for the Afterlife. Inquiry 26 (2):209 – 230.
    An inquiry into the possibility that life?after?death be understood as waking from a shared dream into the real world. Attempts to outlaw the possibility that ?really? we are, e.g., vat?brains are shown to lead to unwelcome, anti?realist conclusions about either the world or consciousness. The unsatisfactory nature of empirically observable (Humean) causal connections suggests that real causes may be found beyond the world of our present experience. Though such a story cannot now be proved to be true, we are (...)
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  26.  18
    Edward F. Pace-Schott (2005). Complex Hallucinations in Waking Suggest Mechanisms of Dream Construction. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (6):771-772.
    Waking hallucinations suggest mechanisms of dream initiation and maintenance. Visual association cortex activation, yielding poorly attended-to, visually ambiguous dream environments, suggests conditions favoring hallucinosis. Attentional and visual systems, coactivated during sleep, may generate imagery that is inserted into virtual environments. Internally consistent dreaming may evolve from successive, contextually evoked images. Fluctuating arousal and context-evoked imagery may help explain dream features.
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  27.  22
    Robert P. Vertes (2005). Sleep is for Rest, Waking Consciousness is for Learning and Memory – of Any Kind. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (1):86-87.
    Although considerable attention has been paid to the possible involvement of sleep in memory processing, there is no substantial evidence for it. Walker describes a phenomenon of consolidation-based enhancement (CBE), whereby performance on select procedural tasks improves with overnight sleep; that is, without additional practice on the tasks. CBE, however, appears restricted to a few tasks, and even with these tasks CBE is not confined to sleep but also occurs during wakefulness. Sleep serves no unique role in this process. At (...)
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  28.  14
    Ernest Hartmann (2000). The Waking-to-Dreaming Continuum and the Effects of Emotion. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (6):947-950.
    The three-dimensional “AIM model” proposed by Hobson et al. is imaginative. However, many kinds of data suggest that the “dimensions” are not orthogonal, but closely correlated. An alternative view is presented in which mental functioning is considered as a continuum, or a group of closely linked continua, running from focused waking activity at one end, to dreaming at the other. The effect of emotional state is increasingly evident towards the dreaming end of the continuum. [Hobson et al.; Nielsen; Solms].
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  29. Christian Coseru (2016). Introduction to Symposium on Waking, Dreaming, Being: Self and Consciousness in Neuroscience, Meditation, and Philosophy by Evan Thompson. Philosophy East and West 66 (3):923-926.
    The papers gathered here were first presented at an “Author Meets Critics” invited session that I organized for the Pacific Division of the American Philosophical Association meeting, held in Vancouver, April 1–5, 2015, on Evan Thompson’s book Waking, Dreaming, Being: Self and Consciousness in Neuroscience, Meditation, and Philosophy. Thompson opened the session with a précis of his book, which was followed by critical commentaries from John Dunne, Owen Flanagan, and Jay Garfield; Jennifer Windt was also an invited contributor to (...)
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  30.  57
    L. E. Thomas (1953). Waking and Dreaming. Analysis 13 (6):121 - 127.
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  31.  97
    Peter Beilharz (1989). Martin Walker, The Waking Giant: The Soviet Union Under Gorbachev (Abacus, 1988). Thesis Eleven 22 (1):143-144.
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  32.  89
    Cynthia Willett (2014). Going to Bed White and Waking Up Arab: On Xenophobia, Affect Theories of Laughter, and the Social Contagion of the Comic Stage. Critical Philosophy of Race 2 (1):84-105.
    Like lynching and other mass hysterias, xenophobia exemplifies a contagious, collective wave of energy and hedonic quality that can point toward a troubling unpredictability at the core of political and social systems. While earlier studies of mass hysteria and popular discourse assume that cooler heads (aka rational individuals with their logic) could and should regain control over those emotions that are deemed irrational, and that boundaries are assumed healthy only when intact, affect studies pose individuals as nodes of biosocial networks (...)
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  33. Stevan Harnad, Waking OA's “Slumbering Giant”: The University's Mandate To Mandate Open Access.
    SUMMARY: Universities (the universal research-providers) as well as research funders (public and private) are beginning to make it part of their mandates to ensure not only that researchers conduct and publish peer-reviewed research (“publish or perish”), but that they also make it available online, free for all. This is called Open Access (OA), and it maximizes the uptake, impact and progress of research by making it accessible to all potential users worldwide, not just those whose universities can afford to subscribe (...)
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  34.  27
    David Kahn & J. Allan Hobson (2005). State-Dependent Thinking: A Comparison of Waking and Dreaming Thought. Consciousness and Cognition 14 (3):429-438.
    Thinking is known to be state dependent but a systematic study of how thinking in dreams differs from thinking while awake has not been done. The study consisted of analyzing the dream reports of 26 subjects who, in addition to providing dream reports also provided answers to questions about their thinking within the dream. Our hypothesis was that thinking in dreams is not monolithic but has two distinct components, one that is similar to wake-state cognition, and another that is fundamentally (...)
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  35.  5
    Jana Speth, Clemens Speth & Trevor A. Harley (2015). Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation of the Motor Cortex in Waking Resting State Induces Motor Imagery. Consciousness and Cognition 36:298-305.
  36. J. A. J. Drewitt (1911). On the Distinction Between Waking and Dreaming. Mind 20 (77):67-73.
  37.  13
    Bernard J. Baars (1995). Surprisingly Small Subcortical Structures Are Needed for the State of Waking Consciousness, While Cortical Projection Areas Seem to Provide Perceptual Contents of Consciousness. Consciousness and Cognition 4 (2):159-62.
  38.  3
    V. B. Mountcastle, B. C. Motter & R. A. Andersen (1980). Some Further Observations on the Functional Properties of Neurons in the Parietal Lobe of the Waking Monkey. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3 (4):520.
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  39. David Feinstein, Ann Mortifee & K. Krippner (1998). Waking to the Rhythm of a New Myth. World Futures 52:187-238.
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  40.  12
    Reg Naulty (2015). Review of Sam Harris, Waking Up: A Guide to Spirituality Without Religion. [REVIEW] Sophia 54 (1):115-116.
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  41.  1
    Evan Thompson (2016). Response to Commentators on Waking, Dreaming, Being. Philosophy East and West 66 (3):982-1000.
    Let me begin by thanking my commentators for taking the time to read my book and to write such constructive commentaries. I would also like to thank Christian Coseru for organizing and chairing the panel at the International Society for Buddhist Philosophy at the 2015 meeting of the Pacific Division of the American Philosophical Association, at which three of the commentaries were originally presented together with my response. Finally, I am grateful to Philosophy East and West for publishing this exchange. (...)
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  42.  1
    Gordon C. F. Bearn (1997). Waking to Wonder: Wittgenstein's Existential Investigations. State University of New York Press.
    The central claim of this book is that, early and late, Wittgenstein modelled his approach to existential meaning on his account of linguistic meaning. A reading of Nietzsche’s The Birth of Tragedy sets up Bearn’s reading of the existential point of Wittgenstein’s Tractatus. Bearn argues that both books try to resolve our anxiety about the meaning of life by appeal to the deep, unutterable essence of the world. Bearn argues that as Wittgenstein’s and Nietzsche’s thought matured, they both separately came (...)
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  43.  19
    Craig Cox (1992). Is Business Waking Up? Business Ethics 6 (1):20-22.
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  44. Tracey L. Kahan & S. LaBerge (1996). Cognition and Metacognition in Dreaming and Waking: Comparisons of First and Third-Person Ratings. Dreaming 6:235-249.
     
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  45.  7
    Jesús Ilundáin-Agurruza (2014). 6—Waking Up From The Cognitivist Dream—The Computational View of the Mind and High Performance. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 8 (4):344-373.
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  46. David Kahn, Edward F. Pace-Schott & J. Allan Hobson (1997). Consciousness in Waking and Dreaming: The Roles of Neuronal Oscillation and Neuromodulation in Determining Similarities and Differences. Neuroscience 78:13-38.
  47.  6
    K. Iwama & Y. Fukuda (1978). Sleep-Waking Studies on the Lateral Geniculate Nucleus and Visual Cortex. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 1 (3):494.
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  48.  6
    Orlando Bruno Linhares (2005). Waking From Dogmatic Slumber. Trans/Form/Ação 28 (2):53-81.
    In this article I argue against the very diffused interpretation according to the year of 1769 represented a frontier in the formation of transcendental philosophy and that the Dissertation of 1770 corresponds to the first critical text. The objective of this article is to investigate the origin of the antinomies in Reflections in the seventies. It doesn't mean to sketch the antinomies, so about them Kant is reticent in this period. They are object of his attention only the day before (...)
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  49.  27
    Rom Harré (2001). Waking to Wonder. International Studies in Philosophy 33 (2):139-141.
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  50.  5
    John Dominic Crossan (1978). Waking the Bible Biblical Hermeneutic and Literary Imagination. Interpretation 32 (3):269-285.
    An important feature of contemporary biblical studies is the movement of many interpreters in a direction that leads from historical to literary criticism and then from classical to structural literary criticism.
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