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Dorothy Walsh [31]David Walsh [25]Denis M. Walsh [15]D. M. Walsh [13]
Denis Walsh [5]D. Walsh [3]D. C. Walsh [3]Deatra Walsh [2]

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Profile: David Walsh (University of Ottawa)
Profile: David Walsh (Trinity College Dublin)
Profile: Daithi Walsh
Profile: Daniel Joseph Walsh
Profile: Daniel Walsh (University of Toronto)
Profile: Dermott J. Walsh (University of California, Los Angeles)
  1. Ken Knisely, David Walsh & Mark Murphy (unknown). Freedom: Dvd. Milk Bottle Productions.
    From Locke to Kierkegaard to those annoying car ads that promise “No Boundaries”— Is our use of the word 'freedom' still coherent? Was it ever coherent? Is it significant that this fuzzy term is so often used to carry so much rhetorical force? With Larry Hatab , David Walsh , and Mark Murphy.
     
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  2. Ken Knisely, Larry Hatab, David Walsh & Mark Murphy (forthcoming). Freedom: No Dogs or Philosophers Allowed. DVD.
    From Locke to Kierkegaard to those annoying car ads that promise “No Boundaries”— Is our use of the word 'freedom' still coherent? Was it ever coherent? Is it significant that this fuzzy term is so often used to carry so much rhetorical force? With Larry Hatab , David Walsh , and Mark Murphy.
     
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  3. Kristine Nelson, Declan Walsh, Paula Deeter & Finbar Sheehan (forthcoming). A Phase II Study of Delta-9-Tetrahydrocannabinol for Appetite Stimulation in Cancer-Associated Anorexia. Journal of Palliative Care.
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  4. D. M. Walsh (forthcoming). Variance, Invariance and Statistical Explanation. Erkenntnis:1-21.
    The most compelling extant accounts of explanation casts all explanations as causal. Yet there are sciences, theoretical population biology in particular, that explain their phenomena by appeal to statistical, non-causal properties of ensembles. I develop a generalised account of explanation. An explanation serves two functions: metaphysical and cognitive. The metaphysical function is discharged by identifying a counterfactually robust invariance relation between explanans event and explanandum. The cognitive function is discharged by providing an appropriate description of this relation. I offer examples (...)
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  5. Denis M. Walsh (forthcoming). Two neo-darwinisms. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences.
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  6. C. M. Tiplady, D. B. Walsh & C. J. C. Phillips (2015). Ethical Issues Concerning the Public Viewing of Media Broadcasts of Animal Cruelty. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 28 (4):635-645.
    Undercover filming is a method commonly used by animal activist groups to expose animal cruelty and it is important to consider the effects of publically releasing video footage of cruel practices on the viewers’ mental health. Previously, we reported that members of the Australian public were emotionally distressed soon after viewing media broadcasts of cruelty to Australian cattle exported for slaughter in Indonesia in 2011. To explore if there were any long term impacts from exposure to media on this issue, (...)
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  7. D. M. Walsh (2015). Organisms, Agency, and Evolution. Cambridge University Press.
    The central insight of Darwin's Origin of Species is that evolution is an ecological phenomenon, arising from the activities of organisms in the 'struggle for life'. By contrast, the Modern Synthesis theory of evolution, which rose to prominence in the twentieth century, presents evolution as a fundamentally molecular phenomenon, occurring in populations of sub-organismal entities - genes. After nearly a century of success, the Modern Synthesis theory is now being challenged by empirical advances in the study of organismal development and (...)
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  8. R. Paul Thompson & Denis Walsh (eds.) (2014). Evolutionary Biology: Conceptual, Ethical, and Religious Issues. Cambridge.
    Evolution - both the fact that it occurred and the theory describing the mechanisms by which it occurred - is an intrinsic and central component in modern biology. Theodosius Dobzhansky captures this well in the much-quoted title of his 1973 paper 'Nothing in biology makes sense except in the light of evolution'. The correctness of this assertion is even more obvious today: philosophers of biology and biologists agree that the fact of evolution is undeniable and that the theory of evolution (...)
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  9. Ethan Alexander-Davey, Steven D. Ealy, Khalil M. Habib, Michael Kochin, John P. Moran, Ellis Sandoz, Ron Srigley, David Walsh & Jingcai Ying (2013). Dostoevsky's Political Thought. Lexington Books.
    This book explores Dostoevsky as a political thinker from his religious and philosophical foundation to nineteenth-century European politics and how themes that he had examined are still relevant for us today.
     
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  10. Catherine M. Tiplady, Deborah-Anne B. Walsh & Clive J. C. Phillips (2013). Public Response to Media Coverage of Animal Cruelty. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 26 (4):869-885.
    Activists’ investigations of animal cruelty expose the public to suffering that they may otherwise be unaware of, via an increasingly broad-ranging media. This may result in ethical dilemmas and a wide range of emotions and reactions. Our hypothesis was that media broadcasts of cruelty to cattle in Indonesian abattoirs would result in an emotional response by the public that would drive their actions towards live animal export. A survey of the public in Australia was undertaken to investigate their reactions and (...)
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  11. Denis M. Walsh (2013). Descriptions and Models: Some Responses to Abrams. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 44 (3):302-308.
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  12. Denis M. Walsh (2013). Mechanism, Emergence, and Miscibility: The Autonomy of Evo-Devo. In Philippe Huneman (ed.), Functions: Selection and Mechanisms. Springer 43--65.
  13. D. M. Walsh (2012). The Struggle for Life and the Conditions of Existence : Two Interpretations of Darwinian Evolution. In Martin H. Brinkworth & Friedel Weinert (eds.), Evolution 2.0: Implications of Darwinism in Philosophy and the Social and Natural Sciences. Springer
     
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  14. Denis Walsh (2012). Mechanism and Purpose: A Case for Natural Teleology. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 43 (1):173-181.
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  15. Deatra Walsh (2011). In2009, the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC) Launched its First Ever Great Canadian Song Quest. The Purpose of the Contest: To Immortal-Ize Canadian Places Through Song (Http://Www. Cbc. Ca/Radio2/Songquest/). The Campaign Called on Members of the Canadian Public to Nominate Great Places Representative of the Country's Regions, Choose a Favorite, and Vote. [REVIEW] In Godfrey Baldacchino (ed.), Island Songs: A Global Repertoire. Scarecrow Press 65.
  16. Deatra Walsh (2011). Newfoundland : From Ron Hynes to Hey Rosetta! In Godfrey Baldacchino (ed.), Island Songs: A Global Repertoire. Scarecrow Press
     
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  17. Dermott J. Walsh (2011). The Confucian Roots of Zen No Kenkyū: Nishida's Debt to Wang Yang-Ming in the Search for a Philosophy of Praxis. Asian Philosophy 21 (4):361 - 372.
    This essay takes as its focus Japanese philosopher Nishida Kitar? (1870?1945) and his seminal first text, An Inquiry into the Good (or in Japanese zen no kenky?). Until now scholarship has taken for granted the predominantly Buddhist orientation of this text, centered around an analysis of the central concept of ?pure experience? (junsui keiken) as something Nishdia extrapolates from his early experience of Zen meditation. However, in this paper I will present an alternative and more accurate account of the origins (...)
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  18. D. M. Walsh (ed.) (2010). Naturalism, Evolution and Mind. Cambridge University Press.
    This collection of original essays covers a wide range of issues in current naturalised philosophy of mind. Particular attention is paid to the ways in which concepts drawn from evolutionary biology might enhance our understanding of the place of mind in the natural world. Issues covered include: the advantages of construing the mind as an adaptation, the naturalisation of intentional and phenomenal content, the evolution of means-end reasoning, rationality and higher-order intentionality, methodological issues in cognitive ethology and evolutionary psychology.
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  19. Denis M. Walsh (2010). Not a Sure Thing: Fitness, Probability, and Causation. Philosophy of Science 77 (2):147-171.
    In evolutionary biology changes in population structure are explained by citing trait fitness distribution. I distinguish three interpretations of fitness explanations—the Two‐Factor Model, the Single‐Factor Model, and the Statistical Interpretation—and argue for the last of these. These interpretations differ in their degrees of causal commitment. The first two hold that trait fitness distribution causes population change. Trait fitness explanations, according to these interpretations, are causal explanations. The last maintains that trait fitness distribution correlates with population change but does not cause (...)
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  20. Denis M. Walsh, Leah Henderson, Noah D. Goodman, Joshua B. Tenenbaum, James F. Woodward, Hannes Leitgeb, Richard Pettigrew, Brad Weslake & John Kulvicki (2010). 1. Not a Sure Thing: Fitness, Probability, and Causation Not a Sure Thing: Fitness, Probability, and Causation (Pp. 147-171). [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 77 (2).
     
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  21. Denis Walsh (2009). A Commentary on Blute's 'Updated Definition'. Spontaneous Generations 2 (1):6.
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  22. David Walsh (2008). The Modern Philosophical Revolution: The Luminosity of Existence. Cambridge University Press.
    The Modern Philosophical Revolution breaks new ground by demonstrating the continuity of European philosophy from Kant to Derrida. Much of the literature on European philosophy has emphasized the breaks that have occurred in the course of two centuries of thinking. But as David Walsh argues, such a reading overlooks the extent to which Kant, Hegel, and Schelling were already engaged in the turn toward existence as the only viable mode of philosophizing. Where many similar studies summarize individual thinkers, this book (...)
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  23. Denis Walsh (2008). Teleology. In Michael Ruse (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Biology. Oxford University Press 113--137.
     
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  24. D. Walsh (2007). Darwinian Reductionism: Or, How to Stop Worrying and Love Molecular Biology. [REVIEW] Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 98:886-887.
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  25. Denis Walsh (2007). Development: Three Grades of Ontogenetic Involvement. In Mohan Matthen & Christopher Stephens (eds.), Philosophy of Biology. Elsevier 179--200.
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  26. Denis M. Walsh (2007). The Pomp of Superfluous Causes: The Interpretation of Evolutionary Theory. Philosophy of Science 74 (3):281-303.
    There are two competing interpretations of the modern synthesis theory of evolution: the dynamical (also know as ‘traditional’) and the statistical. The dynamical interpretation maintains that explanations offered under the auspices of the modern synthesis theory articulate the causes of evolution. It interprets selection and drift as causes of population change. The statistical interpretation holds that modern synthesis explanations merely cite the statistical structure of populations. This paper offers a defense of statisticalism. It argues that a change in trait frequencies (...)
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  27. D. M. Walsh (2006). Organisms as Natural Purposes: The Contemporary Evolutionary Perspective. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 37 (4):771-791.
    I argue that recent advances in developmental biology demonstrate the inadequacy of suborganismal mechanism. The category of the organism, construed as a ’natural purpose’ should play an ineliminable role in explaining ontogenetic development and adaptive evolution. According to Kant the natural purposiveness of organisms cannot be demonstrated to be an objective principle in nature, nor can purposiveness figure in genuine explain. I attempt to argue, by appeal to recent work on self-organization, that the purposiveness of organisms is a natural phenomenon (...)
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  28. Denis M. Walsh (2006). Evolutionary Essentialism. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 57 (2):425-448.
    According to Aristotelian essentialism, the nature of an organism is constituted of a particular goal-directed disposition to produce an organism typical of its kind. This paper argues—against the prevailing orthodoxy—that essentialism of this sort is indispensable to evolutionary biology. The most powerful anti-essentialist arguments purport to show that the natures of organisms play no explanatory role in modern synthesis biology. I argue that recent evolutionary developmental biology provides compelling evidence to the contrary. Developmental biology shows that one must appeal to (...)
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  29. David Walsh (2005). Hegel and the Hermetic Tradition. Review of Metaphysics 59 (2):440-442.
  30. David Walsh (2005). Glenn Alexander Magee: Hegel and the Hermetic Tradition. [REVIEW] Review of Metaphysics 59 (2).
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  31. D. M. Walsh (2004). Bookkeeping or Metaphysics? The Units of Selection Debate. Synthese 138 (3):337 - 361.
    The Units of Selection debate is a dispute about the causes of population change. I argue that it is generated by a particular `dynamical'' interpretation of natural selection theory, according to which natural selection causes differential survival and reproduction of individuals and natural selection explanations cite these causes. I argue that the dynamical interpretation is mistaken and offer in outline an alternative, `statistical'' interpretation, according to which natural selection theory is a fancy kind of `bookkeeping''. It explains by citing the (...)
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  32. Paul Thagard, Kim Sterelny, Richard Richards, Denis M. Walsh, James W. McAllister, Marcel Boumans, Meir Hemmo, Orly Shenker & Matthew W. Parker (2003). 10. Response to Vollmer's Review of Minds and Molecules Response to Vollmer's Review of Minds and Molecules (Pp. 391-398). [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 70 (2).
     
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  33. Denis M. Walsh (2003). Fit and Diversity: Explaining Adaptive Evolution. Philosophy of Science 70 (2):280-301.
    According to a prominent view of evolutionary theory, natural selection and the processes of development compete for explanatory relevance. Natural selection theory explains the evolution of biological form insofar as it is adaptive. Development is relevant to the explanation of form only insofar as it constrains the adaptation-promoting effects of selection. I argue that this view of evolutionary theory is erroneous. I outline an alternative, according to which natural selection explains adaptive evolution by appeal to the statistical structure of populations, (...)
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  34. Eric Voegelin & David Walsh (2002). Anamnesis (Cw6): On the Theory of History and Politics. University of Missouri.
    Volume 6 of The Collected Works of Eric Voegelin offers the first translation of the full German text of Anamnesis published in 1966.
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  35. Denis M. Walsh (2002). Brentano's Chestnuts. In Andre Ariew, Robert Cummins & Mark Perlman (eds.), Functions. Oxford University Press 314.
  36. Denis M. Walsh, Andre Ariew & Tim Lewens (2002). The Trials of Life: Natural Selection and Random Drift. Philosophy of Science 69 (3):452-473.
    We distinguish dynamical and statistical interpretations of evolutionary theory. We argue that only the statistical interpretation preserves the presumed relation between natural selection and drift. On these grounds we claim that the dynamical conception of evolutionary theory as a theory of forces is mistaken. Selection and drift are not forces. Nor do selection and drift explanations appeal to the (sub-population-level) causes of population level change. Instead they explain by appeal to the statistical structure of populations. We briefly discuss the implications (...)
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  37. D. Walsh (ed.) (2001). Evolution, Naturalism and Mind. Cambridge University Press.
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  38. D. M. Walsh, Causes of Adaptation and the Unity of Science.
    Evolutionary Biology has two principal explananda, fit and diversity (Lewontin 1978). Natural selection theory stakes its claim to being the central unifying concept in biology on the grounds that it demonstrates both phenomena to be the consequence of a single process. By now the standard story hardly needs reiterating: Natural selection is a force that operates over a population, preserving the better fit, culling the less fit, and along the way promoting novel solutions to adaptive problems. Amundson’s historical survey of (...)
     
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  39. D. M. Walsh (2001). Editor's Introduction. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 49 (1-2):1-21.
    In the summer of 1997 one could scarcely enter a bookstore in Beijing without encountering Wang Xiaobo's pensive and defiant look on the cover of dozens of books displayed at the entrance. Wang had suddenly died in the spring of that year at the age of forty-five. Born in Beijing in 1952 to a family of intellectuals, he remained attached to China's capital despite periods of separation, such as during the Cultural Revolution, when he was sent to Yunnan to "learn (...)
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  40. D. M. Walsh (2001). Preface. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 49.
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  41. Denis M. Walsh (ed.) (2001). Naturalism, Evolution and the Mind. Cambridge University Press.
    This collection of original essays covers a wide range of issues in current naturalised philosophy of mind.
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  42. D. M. Walsh (2000). Chasing Shadows: Natural Selection and Adaptation. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science 31 (1):135-53.
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  43. Eric Voegelin & David Walsh (1999). History of Political Ideas, Volume 8 (Cw26): Crisis and the Apocalypse of Man. University of Missouri.
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  44. David Walsh (1999). Guarded by Mystery Meaning in a Postmodern Age.
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  45. Denis M. Walsh (1999). Alternative Individualism. Philosophy of Science 66 (4):628-648.
    Psychological individualism is motivated by two taxonomic principles: (i) that psychological states are individuated by their causal powers, and (ii) that causal powers supervene upon intrinsic physiological state. I distinguish two interpretations of individualism--the 'orthodox' and the 'alternative'--each of which is consistent with these motivating principles. I argue that the alternative interpretation is legitimately individualistic on the grounds that it accurately reflects the actual taxonomic practices of bona fide individualistic sciences. The classification of homeobox genes in developmental genetics provides an (...)
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  46. D. M. Walsh (1998). The Scope of Selection: Sober and Neander on What Natural Selection Explains. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 76 (2):250 – 264.
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  47. David Walsh & Eric Voegelin (1998). History of Political Ideas, Volume 3 : The Later Middle Ages. University of Missouri.
     
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  48. Denis M. Walsh (1998). Wide Content Individualism. Mind 107 (427):625-652.
    Wide content and individualist approaches to the individuation of thoughts appear to be incompatible; I think they are not. I propose a criterion for the classification of thoughts which captures both. Thoughts, I claim, should be individuated by their teleological functions. Where teleological function is construed in the standard way - according to the aetiological theory - individuating thoughts by their function cannot produce a classification which is both individualistic and consistent with the principle that sameness of wide content is (...)
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  49. Pauline Lightbody, Gerda Siann, Louise Tait & David Walsh (1997). A Fulfilling Career? Factors Which Influence Women's Choice of Profession. Educational Studies 23 (1):25-37.
    First year university students enrolled on courses which have remained male dominated, including engineering, physics and computer science and two courses, law and medicine, on which females now outnumber males , completed a questionnaire concerned with the reasons why they chose their particular course. Analyses were carried out using a stepwise discriminant function analysis. The results of this study indicate that the reasons women favour law and medicine, rather than more technological courses, is that the former courses are seen as (...)
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  50. D. Walsh (1997). Review. Complexity and the Function of Mind in Nature. Peter Godfrey-Smith. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 48 (4):613-617.
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