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Sven Walter [51]Edward Walter [25]H. Walter [19]Emil J. Walter [17]
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Profile: Sven Walter (University of Osnabrück)
Profile: Scott A. Walter (University of Nantes)
Profile: Alastair Walter (University of Wales Lampeter)
Profile: Viktoria Inez Walter (University of Exeter)
Profile: Brooke Walter (University of Ottawa)
Profile: Casey Walter
Profile: Cameron Walter (Indiana University Purdue University, Indianapolis)
Profile: Daniel Walter
Profile: Darren Walter (University of Manchester)
Profile: Gabriel Walter
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  1.  30
    Achim Stephan, Sven Walter & Wendy Wilutzky (2013). Emotions Beyond Brain and Body. Philosophical Psychology 27 (1):1-17.
    The emerging consensus in the philosophy of cognition is that cognition is situated, i.e., dependent upon or co-constituted by the body, the environment, and/or the embodied interaction with it. But what about emotions? If the brain alone cannot do much thinking, can the brain alone do some emoting? If not, what else is needed? Do (some) emotions (sometimes) cross an individual's boundary? If so, what kinds of supra-individual systems can be bearers of affective states, and why? And does that make (...)
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  2.  87
    Sven Walter (2010). Locked-in Syndrome, Bci, and a Confusion About Embodied, Embedded, Extended, and Enacted Cognition. Neuroethics 3 (1):61-72.
    In a recent contribution to this journal, Andrew Fenton and Sheri Alpert have argued that the so-called “extended mind hypothesis” allows us to understand why Brain Computer Interfaces (BCIs) have the potential to change the self of patients suffering from Locked-in syndrome (LIS) by extending their minds beyond their bodies. I deny that this can shed any light on the theoretical, or philosophical, underpinnings of BCIs as a tool for enabling communication with, or bodily action by, patients with LIS: (...)
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  3. Torin Alter & Sven Walter (eds.) (2007/2009). Phenomenal Concepts and Phenomenal Knowledge: New Essays on Consciousness and Physicalism. Oxford University Press.
    What is the nature of consciousness? How is consciousness related to brain processes? This volume collects thirteen new papers on these topics: twelve by leading and respected philosophers and one by a leading color-vision scientist. All focus on consciousness in the "phenomenal" sense: on what it's like to have an experience. Consciousness has long been regarded as the biggest stumbling block for physicalism, the view that the mind is physical. The controversy has gained focus over the last few decades, and (...)
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  4. Sven Walter (2008). The Supervenience Argument, Overdetermination, and Causal Drainage: Assessing Kim's Master Argument. Philosophical Psychology 21 (5):673 – 696.
    This paper examines Jaegwon Kim's Supervenience Argument (SA) against nonreductive physicalism, concentrating on Kim's response to two of the most important objections against the SA: First, the Overdetermination Argument, according to which Kim has no convincing argument against the possibility that mental causation might be a case of genuine or systematic overdetermination; second, the Generalization Argument, according to which the SA would entail that causation at any level gives way to causation at the next lower level, thereby leading to an (...)
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  5.  41
    Sven Walter (2014). Willusionism, Epiphenomenalism, and the Feeling of Conscious Will. Synthese 191 (10):2215-2238.
    While epiphenomenalism—i.e., the claim that the mental is a causally otiose byproduct of physical processes that does not itself cause anything—is hardly ever mentioned in philosophical discussions of free will, it has recently come to play a crucial role in the scientific attack on free will led by neuroscientists and psychologists. This paper is concerned with the connection between epiphenomenalism and the claim that free will is an illusion, in particular with the connection between epiphenomenalism and willusionism, i.e., with the (...)
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  6. Hans Kelsen, Kurt Ringhofer, Robert Walter & Hans Kelsen-Institut (1979). Allgemeine Theorie der Normen.
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  7.  79
    Miriam Kyselo & Sven Walter (2011). Belief Integration in Action: A Defense of Extended Beliefs. Philosophical Psychology 24 (2):245-260.
  8.  65
    Sven Walter (2010). Cognitive Extension: The Parity Argument, Functionalism, and the Mark of the Cognitive. Synthese 177 (2):285-300.
    During the past decade, the so-called “hypothesis of cognitive extension,” according to which the material vehicles of some cognitive processes are spatially distributed over the brain and the extracranial parts of the body and the world, has received lots of attention, both favourable and unfavourable. The debate has largely focussed on three related issues: (1) the role of parity considerations, (2) the role of functionalism, and (3) the importance of a mark of the cognitive. This paper critically assesses these (...)
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  9.  66
    Sven Walter (2010). Taking Realization Seriously: No Cure for Epiphobia. [REVIEW] Philosophical Studies 151 (2):207 - 226.
    The realization relation that allegedly holds between mental and physical properties plays a crucial role for so-called non-reductive physicalism because it is supposed to secure both the ontological autonomy of mental properties and, despite their irreducibility, their ability to make a causal difference to the course of the causally closed physical world. For a long time however, the nature of realization has largely been ignored in the philosophy of mind until a couple of years ago authors like Carl Gillett, Derk (...)
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  10.  67
    Sven Walter (2007). Determinables, Determinates, and Causal Relevance. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 37 (2):217-244.
  11.  65
    Henrik Walter (2001). Neurophilosophy of Free Will. MIT Press.
  12.  94
    Sven Walter & Miriam Kyselo (2009). Fred Adams, Ken Aizawa: The Bounds of Cognition. [REVIEW] Erkenntnis 71 (2):277-281.
  13.  75
    Henrik Walter (2012). Author Reply: Empathy and the Brain: How We Can Make Progress. Emotion Review 4 (1):22-23.
    Neuroscientific research on empathy has made much progress recently. How far can we get and how should we do it? Two different routes have been suggested by Dziobek and Jacobs in their commentaries. The first is becoming ecologically more valid by using real-life settings as stimuli. The second is becoming more quantitative by specifying a neurocognitive model, allowing more precise quantitative predictions. Although neither approaches are mutually exclusive, I suggest that these two routes are in a certain tension to each (...)
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  14.  11
    Galston Walter (1999). Diversity, Toleration and Deliberative Democracy: Religious Minorities and Public Schooling, W: Stephen Macedo (Red.). In Stephen Macedo (ed.), Deliberative Politics: Essays on Democracy and Disagreement. Oxford University Press
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  15.  22
    Sven Walter & Markus Eronen (2011). Reduction, Multiple Realizability, and Levels of Reality. In Steven French & Juha Saatsi (eds.), Continuum Companion to the Philosophy of Science. Continuum 138.
    The idea of reduction has appeared in different forms throughout the history of science and philosophy. Thales took water to be the fundamental principle of all things; Leucippus and Democritus argued that everything is composed of small, indivisible atoms; Galileo and Newton tried to explain all motion with a few basic laws; 17th century mechanism conceived of everything in terms of the motions and collisions of particles of matter; British Empiricism held that all knowledge is, at root, experiential knowledge; current (...)
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  16. John Germov, Daphne Habibis, Priscilla Pyett, Maggie Walter, Kristin Natalier & Rebecca Albury (forthcoming). Letter From the President Contents. Nexus.
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  17.  65
    Scott Walter (2002). Book Review: By Abraham A. Ungar. Fundamental Theories of Physics. Kluwer Academic, Dordrecht, The Netherlands, 2001, Xlii+ 413 Pp., $138.00 (Hardcover). [REVIEW] Foundations of Physics 32 (2):327-330.
  18.  32
    Sabine Müller & Henrik Walter (2010). Reviewing Autonomy: Implications of the Neurosciences and the Free Will Debate for the Principle of Respect for the Patient's Autonomy. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 19 (2):205.
    Beauchamp and Childress have performed a great service by strengthening the principle of respect for the patient's autonomy against the paternalism that dominated medicine until at least the 1970s. Nevertheless, we think that the concept of autonomy should be elaborated further. We suggest such an elaboration built on recent developments within the neurosciences and the free will debate. The reason for this suggestion is at least twofold: First, Beauchamp and Childress neglect some important elements of autonomy. Second, neuroscience itself needs (...)
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  19.  48
    L. Carmichael, H. P. Hogan & A. A. Walter (1932). An Experimental Study of the Effect of Language on the Reproduction of Visually Perceived Form. Journal of Experimental Psychology 15 (1):73.
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  20.  35
    Henrik Walter (2012). Social Cognitive Neuroscience of Empathy: Concepts, Circuits, and Genes. Emotion Review 4 (1):9-17.
    This article reviews concepts of, as well as neurocognitive and genetic studies on, empathy. Whereas cognitive empathy can be equated with affective theory of mind, that is, with mentalizing the emotions of others, affective empathy is about sharing emotions with others. The neural circuits underlying different forms of empathy do overlap but also involve rather specific brain areas for cognitive (ventromedial prefrontal cortex) and affective (anterior insula, midcingulate cortex, and possibly inferior frontal gyrus) empathy. Furthermore, behavioral and imaging genetic studies (...)
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  21.  21
    Simon Walter (1999). What is Neurotic Realism? The Philosophers' Magazine 6 (6):18-19.
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  22.  38
    Miriam Kyselo & Sven Walter (2009). Supersizing the Mind. Philosophical Psychology 22 (6):803 – 807.
  23. Sven Walter, Epiphenomenalism. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  24.  79
    Sven Walter (2005). Program Explanations and Causal Relevance. Acta Analytica 20 (36):32-47.
    Frank Jackson and Philip Pettit have defended a non-reductive account of causal relevance known as the ‘program explanation account’. Allegedly, irreducible mental properties can be causally relevant in virtue of figuring in non-redundant program explanations which convey information not conveyed by explanations in terms of the physical properties that actually do the ‘causal work’. I argue that none of the possible ways to spell out the intuitively plausible idea of a program explanation serves its purpose, viz., defends non-reductive physicalism against (...)
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  25. Maggie Walter, John Maynard, Jill Milroy & Martin Nakata (2008). Strengthening Indigenous Research Culture. Nexus 20 (3):8.
     
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  26.  59
    Sven Walter (2006). Multiple Realizability and Reduction: A Defense of the Disjunctive Move. Metaphysica 7 (1):43-65.
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  27.  40
    Sven Walter (2007). The Epistemological Approach to Mental Causation. Erkenntnis 67 (2):273 - 285.
    Epistemological approaches to mental causation argue that the notorious problem of mental causation as captured in the question “How can irreducible, physically realized, and potentially relational mental properties be causally efficacious in the production of physical effects?” has a very simple solution: One merely has to abandon any metaphysical considerations in favor of epistemological considerations and accept that our explanatory practice is a much better guide to causal relevance than the metaphysical reasoning carried out from the philosophical armchair. I argue (...)
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  28. Sven Walter (2006). Causal Exclusion as an Argument Against Non-Reductive Physicalism. Journal of Consciousness Studies 13 (1-2):67-83.
  29.  45
    Scott Walter (2002). Book Review: Beyond Einstein's Velocity Addition Law. By Abraham A. Ungar. Fundamental Theories of Physics 117. Kluwer Academic, Dordrecht, The Netherlands, 2001, Xlii+413 Pp., $138.00 (Hardcover). [REVIEW] Foundations of Physics 32 (2):327-330.
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  30.  7
    Scott A. Walter (forthcoming). Figures of Light in the Early History of Relativity. In David Rowe (ed.), Einstein Studies. Birkhäuser
    Albert Einstein's bold assertion of the form-invariance of the equation of a spherical light wave with respect to inertial frames of reference became, in the space of six years, the preferred foundation of his theory of relativity. Early on, however, Einstein's universal light-sphere invariance was challenged on epistemological grounds by Henri Poincaré, who promoted an alternative demonstration of the foundations of relativity theory based on the notion of a light-ellipsoid. Drawing in part on archival sources, this paper shows how an (...)
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  31.  93
    Michael Walter (1996). Jābir, the Buddhist Yogi Part Two. Journal of Indian Philosophy 24 (2):145-164.
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  32.  16
    Simon Walter (1999). Revealed. The Philosophers' Magazine 5 (5):21-22.
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  33. Sven Walter (2005). Program Explanations and Mental Causation. Acta Analytica 20:32 - 47.
  34.  91
    Henrik Walter (2002). Neurophilosophy of Free Will. In Robert H. Kane (ed.), The Oxford Handbook on Free Will. Oxford University Press
  35.  90
    Brian P. McLaughlin, Ansgar Beckermann & Sven Walter (eds.) (2009/2011). The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Mind. Oxford University Press.
    The study of the mind has always been one of the main preoccupations of philosophers, and has been a booming area of research in recent decades, with remarkable advances in psychology and neuroscience. Oxford University Press now presents the most authoritative and comprehensive guide ever published to the philosophy of mind. An outstanding international team of contributors offer 45 specially written critical surveys of a wide range of topics relating to the mind. The first two sections (...)
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  36.  12
    Simon Walter (2006). Penguins Fail to Prove Existence of God. The Philosophers' Magazine 34:15-17.
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  37.  10
    G. H. Walter (2008). Individuals, Populations and the Balance of Nature: The Question of Persistence in Ecology. Biology and Philosophy 23 (3):417-438.
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  38. James J. Walter (2005). Medical Futility–an Ethical Issue for Clinicians and Patients. Practical Bioethics 1 (3):1.
     
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  39.  12
    Simon Walter (1998). Thinking with Your Feet. The Philosophers' Magazine 2 (2):14-15.
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  40.  23
    Sven Walter & Miriam Kyselo (2009). Supersizing the Mind. Philosophical Psychology 22 (6):803-807.
  41.  10
    M. Cleary, G. E. Hunt & G. Walter (2010). Seclusion and its Context in Acute Inpatient Psychiatric Care. Journal of Medical Ethics 36 (8):459-462.
    In acute inpatient mental health services, patients commonly demonstrate extreme behaviours. A number of coercive practices, such as locked doors, enforced medication and seclusion, are used in these settings to control such behaviours. The aim of this report is to explore briefly some of the contemporary debates pertaining to seclusion. A perusal of the literature reveals a clarion call to end the practice of seclusion, without consideration of feasible alternatives. It is hoped that this brief report will encourage further evidence-based (...)
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  42. Julie Henderson, David Curren, Bonnie Walter, Luisa Toffoli & Debra O’Kane (2011). Relocating Care: Negotiating Nursing Skillmix in a Mental Health Unit for Older Adults. Nursing Inquiry 18 (1):55-65.
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  43. Jennifer K. Walter & Susan Dorr Goold (2011). Commentary. Hastings Center Report 41 (1):12-12.
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  44.  24
    Simon Walter (1999). What is Neurotic Realism? The Philosophers' Magazine 6 (6):18-19.
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  45. Henrik Walter (1999). Neurophilosophie der Willensfreiheit von Libertarischen Illusionen Zum Konzept Natürlicher Autonomie.
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  46.  31
    Sven Walter (2014). Situated Cognition: A Field Guide to Some Open Conceptual and Ontological Issues. Review of Philosophy and Psychology 5 (2):241-263.
    This paper provides an overview over the debate about so-called “situated approaches to cognition” that depart from the intracranialism associated with traditional cognitivism insofar as they stress the importance of body, world, and interaction for cognitive processing. It sketches the outlines of an overarching framework that reveals the differences, commonalities, and interdependencies between the various claims and positions of second-generation cognitive science, and identifies a number of apparently unresolved conceptual and ontological issues.
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  47.  26
    G. H. Walter & R. Hengeveld (2000). The Structure of the Two Ecological Paradigms. Acta Biotheoretica 48 (1):15-46.
    Ecological theory is built upon assumptions about the fundamental nature of organism-environment interactions. We argue that two mutually exclusive sets of such assumptions are available and that they have given rise to alternative approaches to studying ecology. The fundamentally different premises of these approaches render them irreconcilable with one another. In this paper, we present the first logical formalisation of these two paradigms.The more widely-accepted approach - which we label the demographic paradigm - includes both population ecology and community ecology (...)
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  48.  28
    Sven Walter (2008). Physicalism, or Something Near Enough, by Jaegwon Kim. European Journal of Philosophy 16 (1):157–161.
  49. Annemarie S. Walter (forthcoming). Negatieve Campagnevoering in de Nederlandse Consensusdemocratie: De Ontwikkelingen Sinds Fortuyn. Res Publica.
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  50.  3
    Jennifer K. Walter, Elizabeth Pappano & Lainie Friedman Ross (2009). A Descriptive and Moral Evaluation of Providing Informal Medical Care to One's Own Children. Journal of Clinical Ethics 20 (4):353.
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