Search results for 'Walter Bagehot' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Walter Bagehot (1872/1973). Physics and Politics. Westport, Conn.,Greenwood Press.score: 120.0
  2. R. Walter (1997). Facing Walter's Dilemma: Response. Ratio Juris 10:403-421.score: 120.0
     
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  3. Ignaas Devisch (2011). The Progress of Society: An Inquiry Into an 'Old-Fashioned' Thesis of Walter Bagehot. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 19 (3):519 - 541.score: 60.0
    The nineteenth century saw the rise of Darwinism as a new paradigm for the study of nature and man mans an integral part thereof. Many scholars were intent on removing the abstract principles and universal truths of early modern philosophy in favour of understanding man's nature through more scientifically-based methods. Walter Bagehot (1826?1877) was one of the leading exponents of this view. Our focus is on one of Bagehot's famous books, Physics and Politics, or thoughts on the (...)
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  4. Forrest Morgan (ed.) (1995). Collected Works of Walter Bagehot. Routledge.score: 60.0
    Walter Bagehot (1826-1877), the notable Victorian journalist, economist, and historian, was a prolific author of both books and magazine articles. Along with Matthew Arnold he was one of the most lucid and discerning critics of that time. He contributed to many journal articles, notably to the Prospective and National Reviews and The Economist , with a lively and witty style. Widely considered to be a great authority on banking and finance, Bagehot was consulted by Chancellors of the (...)
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  5. Michel S. Zouboulakis (1999). Walter Bagehot on Economic Methodology: Evolutionism and Realisticnessl. Journal of Economic Methodology 6 (1):79-94.score: 48.0
    Bagehot wrote on the methodology of Ricardian political economy some years after the appearance of marginalism. The purpose of this paper is to examine and evaluate his methodological positions. Bagehot made some significant contributions concerning the nature of economic explanation, the relevance of economic assumptions and the limits of the validity of economic theories. His positions were strongly influenced by social anthropology and Darwinian evolutionism. Bagehot's originality lies in his evolutionist view of the Ricardian (...)
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  6. V. Bonanate (1987). Darwinismo e modelli antropologici nella biologia politica di Walter Bagehot. Rivista di Filosofia 78 (1):31-60.score: 45.0
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  7. Patrick Overeem (2012). Walter Bagehot. In Thierry Baudet & Michiel Visser (eds.), Revolutionair Verval En de Conservatieve Vooruitgang in de Achttiende En Negentiende Eeuw. Bakker.score: 45.0
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  8. Abraham Akkerman (2012). Gender Myth and the Mind-City Composite: From Plato’s Atlantis to Walter Benjamin’s Philosophical Urbanism. GeoJournal (in Press; Online Version Published) 78.score: 18.0
    In the early twentieth century Walter Benjamin introduced the idea of epochal and ongoing progression in interaction between mind and the built environment. Since early antiquity, the present study suggests, Benjamin’s notion has been manifest in metaphors of gender in city-form, whereby edifices and urban voids have represented masculinity and femininity, respectively. At the onset of interaction between mind and the built environment are prehistoric myths related to the human body and to the sky. During antiquity gender projection can (...)
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  9. Walter Lippmann (1985). Public Philosopher: Selected Letters of Walter Lippmann. Ticknor & Fields.score: 18.0
  10. Alexei Procyshyn (2013). The Origins of Walter Benjamin's Concept of Philosophical Critique. Metaphilosophy 44 (5):655-681.score: 18.0
    Focusing on Walter Benjamin's earliest pieces dedicated to school reform and the student movement, this article traces the basic critical approaches informing his mature thought back to his struggle to critically implement and transform the theory of concept formation and value presentation developed by his Freiburg teacher, Heinrich Rickert. It begins with an account of Rickert's work, specifically of the concept of Darstellung (presentation) and its central role in Rickert's postmetaphysical theory of historical research (which he characterizes as exclusively (...)
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  11. José Gilardo Carvalho (2012). O Conceito de Violência-Poder eo Caráter Paradoxal do Poder Juridico em Walter Benjamim. Revista Inquietude 3 (1):122-139.score: 18.0
    No presente artigo pretendemos apresentar o conceito de violência-poder em Walter Benjamin (1892 – 1940), com base no ensaio intitulado Crítica do Poder, Crítica da Violência [Zur Kritik der Gewalt] . Utilizamos como ponto de partida da crítica aqui em questão, a consideração da violência-poder no movimento próprio do texto de Walter Benjamim. Nesse sentido, esta exposição tem a seguinte seqüência: a) A recusa crítica dos pressupostos metodológicos do jusnaturalismo e do positivismo jurídico; b) A definição do procedimento (...)
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  12. Stefan Gandler (2003). ¿Por Qué El Ángel de la Historia Mira Hacia Atrás? Acerca de Las Tesis Sobre El Concepto de Historia de Walter Benjamín. Utopía y Praxis Latinoamericana 8 (20):7-39.score: 18.0
    El ángel de la historia, en las tesis de Walter Benjamin, mira hacia atrás por tres razones: Primero, porque epistemológicamente es inevitable y necesario mirar hacia atrás, o sea: el ángel no puede ver adelante y tiene que mirar hacia atrás para poder entender su entorno. Segundo, porque onto..
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  13. Luciano Ferreira Gatti (2011). O ideal de Baudelaire por Walter Benjamin. Trans/Form/Ação 31 (1):127-142.score: 18.0
    O artigo examina a interpretação feita por Walter Benjamin dos poemas de Charles Baudelaire marcados pela noção de ideal, a qual se opõe ao spleen. Benjamin encontra aí o esforço de rememoração de uma experiência plena, a qual constituiria, por sua vez, um elemento essencial à compreensão da modernidade como impossibilidade desta forma de experiência. Com as noções de beleza e de aura, o artigo busca ainda salientar a importância da categoria da distância para a configuração desta forma de (...)
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  14. Kristin Andrews (2003). Neurophilosophy of Free Will: From Libertarian Illusions to a Concept of Natural Autonomy by Henrik Walter. Philo 6 (1):166-175.score: 15.0
  15. Marc Berdet (2012). Chiffonnier contre flâneur: Construction et position de la Passagenarbeit de Walter Benjamin. Archives de Philosophie 75 (3):425-447.score: 15.0
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  16. Gertrude Himmelfarb (2006). The Moral Imagination: From Edmund Burke to Lionel Trilling. Ivan R. Dee.score: 15.0
    Edmund Burke : apologist for Judaism? -- George Eliot : the wisdom of Dorothea -- Jane Austen : the education of Emma -- Charles Dickens : "a low writer" -- Benjamin Disraeli : the Tory imagination -- John Stuart Mill : the other Mill -- Walter Bagehot : "a divided nature" -- John Buchan : an untimely appreciation -- The Knoxes : a God-haunted family -- Michael Oakeshott : the conservative disposition -- Winston Churchill : "quite simply, a (...)
     
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  17. Benjamin Aldes Wurgaft (2010). The Uses of Walter : Walter Benjamin and the Counterfactual Imagination. History and Theory 49 (3):361-383.score: 15.0
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  18. Rondo Keele (2007). Can God Make a Picasso? William Ockham and Walter Chatton on Divine Power and Real Relations. Journal of the History of Philosophy 45 (3):395-411.score: 12.0
    : This article focuses on one aspect of the late mediaeval debate over divine power, as it was discussed by Oxford philosophers Walter Chatton (d. 1343) and William Ockham (d. 1347). Chatton and Ockham would have agreed, for example, that God is ultimately responsible for the existence of the works of Pablo Picasso, but they would not agree over wheher it violates God's omnipotence to say that he cannot make something that Picasso made, for example, the painting Guernica, without (...)
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  19. Andrew E. Benjamin & Charles Rice (eds.) (2009). Walter Benjamin and the Architecture of Modernity. Re.Press.score: 12.0
    Walter Benjamin's Politics of 'bad tasteMichael Mac Modernity as an unfinished Project: Benjamin and Political RomanticismRobert Sinnerbrink Violence, ...
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  20. Verena Erlenbusch (2011). Notes on Violence: Walter Benjamin's Relevance for the Study of Terrorism. Journal of Global Ethics 6 (2):167-178.score: 12.0
    This article uses Walter Benjamin's theoretical claims in the 'Critique of violence' to shed light on some current conceptualisations of terrorism. It suggests an understanding of terrorism as an essentially contested concept. If the theorist uncritically adopts the state's account of terrorism, she occludes an important dimension of the phenomenon that allows for a rethinking of the state's claim to a monopoly on legitimate violence. Benjamin's essay conceptualises the state as resulting from a conjunction of violence, law, legitimacy and (...)
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  21. Matthew Flannagan (2012). Is Ethical Naturalism More Plausible Than Supernaturalism? A Reply to Walter Sinnott-Armstrong. Philo 15 (1):19-37.score: 12.0
    In many of his addresses and debates, William Lane Craig has defended a Divine Command Theory of moral obligation (DCT). In a recent article and subsequent monograph, Walter Sinnott-Armstrong has criticized Craig’s position.1 Armstrong contended that a DCT is subject to several devastating objections and further contended that even if theism is true a particular form of ethical naturalism is a more plausible account of the nature of moral obligations than a DCT is. This paper critiques Armstrong’s argument. I (...)
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  22. Stephan Hartmann & Wouter Meijs (2012). Walter the Banker: The Conjunction Fallacy Reconsidered. [REVIEW] Synthese 184 (1):73-87.score: 12.0
    In a famous experiment by Tversky and Kahneman (Psychol Rev 90:293–315, 1983), featuring Linda the bank teller, the participants assign a higher probability to a conjunction of propositions than to one of the conjuncts, thereby seemingly committing a probabilistic fallacy. In this paper, we discuss a slightly different example featuring someone named Walter, who also happens to work at a bank, and argue that, in this example, it is rational to assign a higher probability to the conjunction of suitably (...)
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  23. Marc de Wilde (2011). Meeting Opposites: The Political Theologies of Walter Benjamin and Carl Schmitt. Philosophy and Rhetoric 44 (4):363-381.score: 12.0
    On 9 December 1930, Walter Benjamin sent a copy of his book The Origin of German Tragic Drama to Carl Schmitt, accompanied by a letter in which he expressed his indebtedness to Schmitt: "You will very quickly recognize how much my book is indebted to you for its presentation of the doctrine of sovereignty in the seventeenth century. Perhaps I may say, in addition, that I have also derived from your later works, especially Die Diktatur, a confirmation of my (...)
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  24. Stefan Gandler (2010). The Concept of History in Walter Benjamin's Critical Theory. Radical Philosophy Review 13 (1):19-42.score: 12.0
    The point of departure of this study is Walter Benjamin’s last text, “Theses on the Philosophy of History.” Benjamin appeals to the significance of theology for historical materialism in order to overcome one of the decisive reasons why Marx’s unique theoretical project, in its positivistic interpretations, was not understood with the necessary radicality and had been in danger of losing its explanatory power and revolutionary impulse. The necessity of looking back to the past constitutes the basic theme of the (...)
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  25. Tyrus Miller (1996). From City-Dreams to the Dreaming Collective: Walter Benjamin's Political Dream Interpretation. Philosophy and Social Criticism 22 (6):87-111.score: 12.0
    This essay discusses Walter Benjamin's development of 'dream' as a model for understanding 19th- and 20th-century urban culture. Following Bergson and surrealist poetics, Benjamin used 'dream' in the 1920s as an heuristic analogy for investigating child hood memories, kitsch art and literature; during the early 1930s, he also developed it into an historiographic concept for studying 19th- century Parisian culture. Benjamin's interpretative use of the dream cuts across Ricoeur's distinction between the hermeneutics of 'recol lection' and the hermeneutics of (...)
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  26. Andrew Benjamin (2012). Morality, Law and the Place of Critique: Walter Benjamin's The Meaning of Time in the Moral World. Critical Horizons 12 (3):281 - 301.score: 12.0
    Critique as a philosophical concept needs to be recast once it is linked to the possibility of a productive opening. In such a context critique has an important affinity to destruction and forms of inauguration. Working through writings of Marx and Walter Benjamin, specifically Benjamin's 'The Meaning of Time in the Moral World', destruction and inauguration are repositioned in terns of othering and the caesura of allowing.
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  27. Atsuko Tsuji (2010). Experience in the Very Moment of Writing: Reconsidering Walter Benjamin's Theory of Mimesis. Journal of Philosophy of Education 44 (1):125-136.score: 12.0
    The purpose of this paper is to examine the ateleological moment of learning through imitation. In general, we can learn something new through imitating models we are given, which embody the values of our own society, culture and institutions. This means that imitation is understood in terms of the representation or reproduction of original models. In this understanding of imitation, however, the creative aspect of imitation is missed. In relation to this I shall, first, consider learning through imitation in terms (...)
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  28. William Dembski, Can Functional Logic Take the Place of Intelligent Design? A Response to Walter Thorson.score: 12.0
    Walter Thorson's two articles on the legitimacy and scope of naturalism within science attempt to identify a mediating position between the reductive naturalism of thinkers like Richard Dawkins and the complete rejection of naturalism by thinkers like Phillip Johnson. Thorson rightly notes that the purely mechanistic approach to science characteristic of reductive naturalism is inadequate. Nonetheless, he argues that science still needs naturalism as a methodological or regulative principle. Thorson's methodological naturalism leaves room for teleology in nature, though (...)
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  29. Wesley Phillips (2010). History or Counter-Tradition? The System of Freedom After Walter Benjamin. Critical Horizons 11 (1):99-118.score: 12.0
    I seek to interpret the work of Walter Benjamin in light of the "system programme" of German Idealism, in order to confront an antinomy of contemporary radical thought. Benjamin has been regarded as an anti-Hegelian thinker of the exception. Reading him against the grain, I draw out a concept of counter-tradition that eschews the opposition of intra-historical progress and extra-historical exception. The philological inspiration is a book by Franz Joseph Molitor, student of Schelling and "teacher" of Benjamin: The Philosophy (...)
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  30. B. Loveluck (2011). The Redemption of Experience: On Walter Benjamin's 'Hermeneutical Materialism'. Philosophy and Social Criticism 37 (2):167-188.score: 12.0
    The aim of this article is to show how philosopher and critic Walter Benjamin related to the hermeneutical tradition — and tried to move beyond it by ‘redeeming’ human experience, while avoiding the pitfalls of the philosophy of ‘authenticity’. Though convinced that questions relating to historicity were central to any understanding of modern human experience, Benjamin explicitly rejected the Heideggerian alternative, and chose a path closer to Hans-Georg Gadamer’s. He attempted to combine theological interpretation with dialectical materialism, always grounding (...)
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  31. Christian Miller (2009). Review of Walter Sinnott-Armstrong (Ed.), Moral Psychology, Volume 2: The Cognitive Science of Morality: Intuition and Diversity. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2009 (7).score: 12.0
    This is the second of three volumes on moral psychology edited by Walter Sinnott-Armstrong and published by MIT Press in 2008.
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  32. Colby Dickinson (2011). Beyond Violence, Beyond the Text: The Role of Gesture in Walter Benjamin and Giorgio Agamben, and its Affinity with the Work of René Girard. Heythrop Journal 52 (6):952-961.score: 12.0
    Though the work of René Girard has highlighted the interrelations between sacrifice and sacrality in the contemporary world, it has yet to engage the work of Walter Benjamin and his heir, Giorgio Agamben, whose project concerning the Homo Sacer has aroused interest in contemporary political thought. By focusing on Benjamin's early description of mimesis and its relation to language, a position can be elaborated that steers mimesis clear of its indebtedness to language and towards a ‘purer’ realm of gesture. (...)
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  33. S. Brent Plate (2005). Walter Benjamin, Religion, and Aesthetics: Rethinking Religion Through the Arts. Routledge.score: 12.0
    Walter Benjamin, Religion, and Aesthetics is an innovative attempt to reconceive the key concepts of religious studies through a reading with, and against, Walter Benjamin. Brent Plate deftly sifts through Benjamin's voluminous writings showing how his concepts of art, allegory, and experience undo traditional religious concepts such as myth, symbol, memory, narrative, creation, and redemption. Recasting religion as religious practice, as process and movement, Plate locates a Benjaminian materialist aesthetics, what the author calls an "allegorical aesthetics," in order (...)
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  34. Henry Walter Brann (1965). A Reply to Walter Kaufmann. Journal of the History of Philosophy 3 (2):246-250.score: 12.0
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  35. Hans Ibold (2011). Walter Williams, Country Editor and Global Journalist: Pastoral Exceptionalism and Global Journalism Ethics at the Turn of the 20th Century. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 25 (3):207-225.score: 12.0
    This article identifies principles for global journalism ethics in speeches and essays by the early 20th century journalist and founder of the first American journalism school, Walter Williams. Williams is not known as a media ethicist, nor is he a prominent figure in ongoing scholarly work on global journalism ethics. However, his nascent ethical principles offer an important foreshadowing of current discussions on how journalism ethics might work in a global context. The global perspective he brought to journalism was (...)
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  36. Joseph D. Lewandowski (2005). Street Culture: The Dialectic of Urbanism in Walter Benjamin’s Passagen-Werk. Philosophy and Social Criticism 31 (3):293-308.score: 12.0
    This article develops a sociological reading of Walter Benjamin’s ‘Arcades Project’, or Passagen-werk . Specifically, the essay seeks to make explicit Benjamin’s non-dualistic account of structure and agency in the urban milieu. I characterize this account as the ‘dialectic of urbanism’, and argue that one of the central insights of Benjamin’s Passagen-werk is that it locates an emergent and innovative cultural form - a distinctive ‘street culture’ or jointly shared way of modern urban life - within haussmannizing techniques of (...)
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  37. Walter Watson (1951). Book Review:Nietzsche: Philosopher, Psychologist, Antichrist. Walter A. Kaufmann. [REVIEW] Ethics 61 (3):231-.score: 12.0
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  38. Walter Headlam (1934). Prometheus and the Garden of Eden: Notes for a Lecture by the Late Walter Headlam. Classical Quarterly 28 (02):63-.score: 12.0
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  39. Mick Smith (2001). Environmental Anamnesis: Walter Benjamin and the Ethics of Extinction. Environmental Ethics 23 (4):359-376.score: 12.0
    Environmentalists often recount tales of recent extinctions in the form of an allegory of human moral failings. But such allegories install an instrumental relation to the past’s inhabitants, using them to carry moralistic messages. Taking the passenger pigeon as a case in point, I argue for a different, ethical relation to the past’s inhabitants that conserves something of the wonder and “strangeness of the Other.” What Walter Benjamin refers to as the “redemptive moment” sparks a recognition of the Other (...)
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  40. Ari Hirvonen (2012). Marx and God with Anarchism: On Walter Benjamin's Concepts of History and Violence. [REVIEW] Continental Philosophy Review 45 (4):519-543.score: 12.0
    The article analyses relationships between profane and religious illumination, materialism and theology, politics and religion, Marxism and Messianism. For Walter Benjamin, every second is “the small gateway in time through which the Messiah might enter”. This is the starting point in the reading of Benjamin’s works, where we confront various liaisons and couplings of radical politics and messianic events. Through the reading of Benjamin and through the analysis of his conceptions of history and time, the article addresses the question (...)
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  41. Christian Miller (2009). Review of Walter Sinnott-Armstrong (Ed.), Moral Psychology, Volume 3: The Neuroscience of Morality: Emotion, Brain Disorders, and Development. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2009 (7).score: 12.0
    This is the third of three volumes on moral psychology edited by Walter Sinnott-Armstrong and published by MIT Press in 2008.
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  42. Paul Vincent Spade & Eleonore Stump (1983). Walter Burley and Theobligationesattributed to William of Sherwood. History and Philosophy of Logic 4 (1-2):9-26.score: 12.0
    The history of the mediaeval obligationes-literature has only recently begun to be studied. Two important treatises in this literature, one by Walter Burley and the other attributed to William of Sherwood, have been edited by Romuald Green in a forthcoming book. But there is considerable doubt concerning the authenticity of the text attributed to Sherwood. The correct attribution and dating of this treatise is crucial for our understanding of the history of this literature. In this paper, we argue that (...)
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  43. Mark Schlatter & Ken Aizawa (2008). Walter Pitts and “a Logical Calculus”. Synthese 162 (2):235 - 250.score: 12.0
    Many years after the publication of “A Logical Calculus of the Ideas Immanent in Nervous Activity,” Warren McCulloch gave Walter Pitts credit for contributing his knowledge of modular mathematics to their joint project. In 1941 I presented my notions on the flow of information through ranks of neurons to Rashevsky’s seminar in the Committee on Mathematical Biology of the University of Chicago and met Walter Pitts, who then was about seventeen years old. He was working on (...)
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  44. Paul Vincent Spade, Boehner’s Text of Walter Burley’s de Puritate Artis Logicae: Some Corrections and Queries.score: 12.0
    I am preparing an English translation of both the Tractatus longior and the Tractatus brevior of Walter Burley’s De puritate artis logicae for the “Yale Library of Medieval Philosophy.” My translation is based of course on the 1955 critical edition by Philotheus Boehner, the only reasonably reliable text available. Nevertheless, in preparing my translation, I have had several occasions to question or correct readings in Boehner’s edition. In some instances the corrections are merely obvious typographical errors, but in others (...)
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  45. Pierfrancesco Fiorato (2006). In margine alla questione dell'origine: Una traccia coheniana nella Premessa al Dramma barocco tedesco di Walter Benjamin. Revista Portuguesa de Filosofia 62 (2/4):491 - 510.score: 12.0
    Uma referênda à obra Kants Theorie der Erfahrung de Hermann Cohen feita na primeira redacção do Prefácio à obra Ursprung des deutschen Trauerspiels de Walter Benjamin faz com que o conceito coheniano de origem saia do sen isolamento, deixando ao mesmo tempo entrever os traços de um confronto mais rico e articulado entre Walter Benjamin e o pensador de Marburgo. A dimensão histórica que segundo Benjamin permanecia fora da exposição coheniana do conceito de origem, emerge aqui de forma (...)
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  46. Aaron Spital & James S. Taylor (2008). In Defense of Routine Recovery of Cadaveric Organs: A Response to Walter Glannon. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 17 (03):337-343.score: 12.0
    Walter Glannon argues that our proposal for routine recovery (also known as conscription) of transplantable cadaveric organs is unacceptable After carefully reviewing his counterarguments, we conclude that, although some of them have merit, none are sufficiently strong to warrant abandoning this plan. Below we respond to each of Glannon's concerns.
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  47. Tobias Hoffmann (2008). Walter Chatton on the Connection of the Virtues. Quaestio 8 (1):57–82.score: 12.0
    This article studies Walter Chatton's account of the connection of the virtues and its relation to the teaching of Henry of Ghent and John Duns Scotus. Chatton's position with regard to the connection of temperance, fortitude, and justice is influenced by Henry and yet importantly different from him. Chatton's teaching on the connection between prudence and the moral virtues closely follows Scotus's view. Both Franciscans frame this problem in terms of the connection between intellect and will. They both deny (...)
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  48. Douglas Kellner, Review of Walter L. Adamson. Marx and the Disillusionment of Marxism. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1985. X + 258 Pp. ISBN 0-520-05286-. [REVIEW]score: 12.0
    Walter Adamson begins his study of Marx and contemporary neo-Marxism with a rehearsal Marxism's oft-cited problems: oppressive regimes which rule in the name of Marxism, the lack of a fully-developed Marxist morality, inaccurate descriptions of contemporary capitalism, and problems in the relation between the Marxian theories of history and society and visions of socialism. Fortunately, Adamson does not simply engage in another tedious demolition job or ideological denunciation of the god that failed in the manner of the French 'new (...)
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  49. Fabio Py Murta de Almeida (2013). LÖWY, Michael. Romantismo e messianismo: ensaios sobre Lukács e Walter Benjamin. Horizonte 11 (30):808-813.score: 12.0
    Resenha LÖWY, Michael. Romantismo e messianismo : ensaios sobre Lukács e Walter Benjamin. Trad. Myriam Vera Baptista e Magdalena Pizante Baptista, 2. ed. São Paulo: Perspectiva, 2012. 213p.
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  50. Detlev Schöttker (1998). Norbert Elias and Walter Benjamin: An Exchange of Letters and its Context. History of the Human Sciences 11 (2):45-59.score: 12.0
    This article discusses the background to Walter Benjamin's famous 'letter to an unknown correspondent', which was part of a series of letters between Benjamin and Norbert Elias. Elias had just finished writing the first volume of The Civilizing Process, and he wrote to Ben jamin asking him to review it, but Benjamin declined. The reasons for his reluctance are discussed. The letters themselves are reproduced at the end of the article.
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