6 found
Sort by:
See also:
Profile: Walter Ott (University of Virginia)
  1. Walter R. Ott (2009). Causation and Laws of Nature in Early Modern Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
    Arguing for controversial readings of many of the canonical figures, the book also focuses on lesser-known writers such as Pierre-Sylvain Regis, Nicolas ...
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Walter R. Ott (2004). The Cartesian Context of Berkeley's Attack on Abstraction. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 85 (4):407–424.
    I claim that Berkeley's main argument against abstraction comes into focus only when we see Descartes as one of its targets. Berkeley does not deploy Winkler's impossibility argument but instead argues that what is impossible is inconceivable. Since Descartes conceives of extension as a determinable, and since determinables cannot exist as such, he falls within the scope of Berkeley's argument.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Walter R. Ott (2003). Locke's Philosophy of Language. Cambridge University Press.
    This book examines John Locke's claims about the nature and workings of language. Walter Ott proposes a new interpretation of Locke's thesis that words signify ideas in the mind of the speaker, and argues that rather than employing such notions as sense or reference, Locke relies on an ancient tradition that understands signification as reliable indication. He then uses this interpretation to explain crucial areas of Locke's metaphysics and epistemology, including essence, abstraction, knowledge, and mental representation. His discussion, which is (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Walter R. Ott (2002). Locke and Signification. Journal of Philosophical Research 27:449-473.
    This paper addresses the following questions: (a) what did Locke mean when he said that ‘words signify ideas’? and (b) what is Locke’s argument for this thesis, and how successful is it? The paper argues that the two most prominent interpretations, those of Norman Kretzmann and E. J. Ashworth, attribute to Locke an argument for his semantic thesis that is fallacious, and that neither can make good sense of two key passages in book 3 of the Essay concerning Human Understanding. (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Walter R. Ott (2001). The Reasonableness of Christianity (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 39 (2):296-297.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Walter R. Ott (2000). A Troublesome Passage in Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics Iii 5. Ancient Philosophy 20 (1):99-107.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation