Search results for 'Wanting' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  42
    I. L. Humberstone (1987). Wanting as Believing. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 17 (March):49-62.
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  2.  53
    I. L. Humberstone (1990). Wanting, Getting, Having. Philosophical Papers 99 (August):99-118.
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  3.  37
    T. F. Daveney (1961). Wanting. Philosophical Quarterly 11 (April):135-144.
  4.  69
    Joel Marks (ed.) (1986). The Ways of Desire: New Essays in Philosophical Psychology on the Concept of Wanting. Transaction Publishers.
    Collection of original essays on the theory of desire by Robert Audi, Annette Baier, Wayne Davis, Ronald de Sousa, Robert Gordon, O.H. Green, Joel Marks, Dennis Stampe, Mitchell Staude, Michael Stocker, and C.C.W. Taylor.
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  5. Daniel C. Dennett (1984). Elbow Room: The Varieties of Free Will Worth Wanting. MIT Press.
    Essays discuss reason, self-control, self-definition, time, cause and effect, accidents, and responsibility, and explain why people want free will.
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  6. Richard Holton (2009). Willing, Wanting, Waiting. Oxford University Press.
    Richard Holton provides a unified account of intention, choice, weakness of will, strength of will, temptation, addiction, and freedom of the will.
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  7.  2
    Daniel C. Dennett (1985). Elbow Room: The Varieties of Free Will Worth Wanting. Oxford University Press Uk.
    Elbow Room The Varieties of Free Will Worth Wanting.
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  8.  51
    Kent C. Berridge (2009). Wanting and Liking: Observations From the Neuroscience and Psychology Laboratory. Inquiry 52 (4):378 – 398.
    Different brain mechanisms seem to mediate wanting and liking for the same reward. This may have implications for the modular nature of mental processes, and for understanding addictions, compulsions, free will and other aspects of desire. A few wanting and liking phenomena are presented here, together with discussion of some of these implications.
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  9.  52
    Luca Ferrero (2012). Willing, Wanting, Waiting by Richard Holton. [REVIEW] Journal of Moral Philosophy 9 (3):443-457.
    In his book Willing, Wanting, Waiting Holton defends a comprehensive view of the will. His central claims are: that we have a capacity of choice, independent of judgment about what is best to do, that resistance to temptation requires a special kind of intentions, resolutions, and the exercise of an executive capacity, willpower, there is a distinction between weakness of will and akrasia. I argue that Holton is right about these claims, but I raise a few concerns: I am (...)
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  10.  43
    Randolph Clarke (1999). Free Choice, Effort, and Wanting More. Philosophical Explorations 2 (1):20-41.
    This paper examines the libertarian account of free choice advanced by Robert Kane in his recent book, The Significance of Free Will. First a rather simple libertarian view is considered, and an objection is raised against it the view fails to provide for any greater degree of agent-control than what could be available in a deterministic world. The basic differences between this simple view and Kane's account are the requirements, on the latter, of efforts of will and of an agent's (...)
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  11.  66
    Joshua May (2009). Review of Richard Holton's Willing, Wanting, Waiting. [REVIEW] Metapsychology 13 (23).
    In an all too familiar part of our lives, we are sometimes strongly tempted to do things we think we shouldn’t do. Consider the burning desire to eat one of the donuts your coworker brought to work while you are on a diet. Often times we surrender to temptation. But sometimes we fight the urges and refrain—we exhibit will-power. Much of our ordinary thinking involves reference to “the will” in this sort of way. Yet for quite some time many contemporary (...)
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  12.  1
    Steve Patroni (2016). Wanting [Book Review]. Australian Humanist, The 121:23.
    Patroni, Steve Review of: Wanting, by Richard Flanagan, Vintage Paperback by Random House, 2009.
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  13. Adrienne Martin, Wanting to Pull Clouds: The Moral Psychology of Hope.
    The extent of the approval with which Western culture views the attitude of hope can scarcely be exaggerated. Hope is seen as that which sustains us through wartime, death camps, slavery, natural disaster, extreme disease and disability—it is a light, a beacon, the last spark that fuels us when all else has failed. Hope is also seen as a moral and spiritual virtue—hoping for moral progress in this world, and salvation in the next, is at the heart of a meaningful (...)
     
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  14. Tyler Doggett & Andy Egan (2007). Wanting Things You Don't Want: The Case for an Imaginative Analogue of Desire. Philosophers' Imprint 7 (9):1-17.
    You’re imagining, in the course of a different game of make-believe, that you’re a bank robber. You don’t believe that you’re a bank robber. You are moved to point your finger, gun-wise, at the person pretending to be the bank teller and say, “Stick ‘em up! This is a robbery!”.
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  15.  37
    Maureen Sie (2005). Ordinary Wrongdoing and Responsibility Worth Wanting. European Journal of Analytic Philosophy 1 (2):67-82.
    In this paper it is argued that we can have defensible attributions of responsibility without first answering the question whether determinism and free will are compatible. The key to such a defense is a focus on the fact that most actions for which we hold one another responsible are quite ordinary—trespassing traffic regulations, tardiness, or breaking a promise. As we will show, unlike actions that problematize our moral competence — e.g. akratic and ‘moral monster’- like ones—ordinary ‘wrong’ actions often disclose (...)
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  16.  36
    Sarah K. Paul (2011). Willing, Wanting, Waiting, by Richard Holton. Mind 120 (479):889-892.
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  17.  14
    Bryan Caplan (2007). Have the Experts Been Weighed, Measured, and Found Wanting? Critical Review 19 (1):81-91.
    ABSTRACT Tetlock's Expert Political Judgment is a creative, careful, and mostly convincing study of the predictive accuracy of political experts. My only major complaints are that Tetlock (1) understates the predictive accuracy of experts, and (2) does too little to discourage demagogues from misinterpreting his work as a vindication of the wisdom of the average citizen. Experts have much to learn from Tetlock's epistemological audit, but there is still ample evidence that, compared to laymen, experts are very good.
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  18.  41
    J. Schlanger (1995). Wanting to Know What Cannot Be Known. Diogenes 43 (169):167-177.
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  19.  11
    Daniel H. Lende (2005). Wanting and Drug Use: A Biocultural Approach to the Analysis of Addiction. Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 33 (1):100-124.
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  20. Manuel Vargas (2005). Compatibilism Evolves?: On Some Varieties of Dennett Worth Wanting. Metaphilosophy 36 (4):460-475.
    I examine the extent to which Dennett’s account in Freedom Evolves might be construed as revisionist about free will or should instead be understood as a more traditional kind of compatibilism. I also consider Dennett’s views about philosophical work on free agency and its relationship to scientific inquiry, and I argue that extant philosophical work is more relevant to scientific inquiry than Dennett’s remarks may suggest.
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  21.  81
    Anthony Brueckner (2003). Not Wanting to Know. Analysis 63 (3):250–256.
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  22.  40
    John Lemos (2011). Wanting, Willing, Trying and Kane's Theory of Free Will. Dialectica 65 (1):31-48.
    Robert Kane's event-causal libertarian theory of free will has been subjected to a variety of criticisms. In response to the luck objection, he has provided an ambiguous answer which results in additional criticisms that are avoidable. I explain Kane's theory, the luck objection and Kane's reply to the problem of luck. I note that in some places he suggests that the dual wantings of agents engaged in self-forming actions (SFAs) provides the key to answering the luck objection, whereas in other (...)
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  23.  39
    Nicholas Rescher (2004). Wants Found Wanting. The Philosophers' Magazine 26 (26):36-37.
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  24.  70
    Janna Hastings, Nicolas Le Novère, Werner Ceusters, Kevin Mulligan & Barry Smith (2012). Wanting What We Don't Want to Want: Representing Addiction in Interoperable Bio-Ontologies. In Ronald Cornet & Robert Stevens (eds.), Proceeedings of the Third International Conference on Biomedical Ontology. CEUR 56-60.
    Ontologies are being developed throughout the biomedical sciences to address standardization, integration, classification and reasoning needs against the background of an increasingly data-driven research paradigm. In particular, ontologies facilitate the translation of basic research into benefits for the patient by making research results more discoverable and by facilitating knowledge transfer across disciplinary boundaries. Addressing and adequately treating mental illness is one of our most pressing public health challenges. Primary research across multiple disciplines such as psychology, psychiatry, biology, neuroscience and pharmacology (...)
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  25.  8
    Jordan Litman (2005). Curiosity and the Pleasures of Learning: Wanting and Liking New Information. Cognition and Emotion 19 (6):793-814.
  26.  85
    John Maier (2010). Review of Willing, Wanting, Waiting. [REVIEW] Australasian Journal of Philosophy 89 (2):361 - 364.
    Australasian Journal of Philosophy, Volume 89, Issue 2, Page 361-364, June 2011.
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  27.  55
    Tamar Schapiro (2012). On the Relation Between Wanting and Willing. Philosophical Issues 22 (1):334-350.
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  28. Daniel H. Lende (2005). Wanting and Drug Use: A Biocultural Approach to the Analysis of Addiction. Ethos 33 (1):100-124.
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  29.  51
    D. Lamb (1990). Danish Ethics Council Rejects Brain Death as the Criterion of Death -- Commentary 1: Wanting It Both Ways. Journal of Medical Ethics 16 (1):8-9.
    In this commentary on the recommendations of the Danish Council of Ethics (DCE) concerning criteria for death it is argued that whilst the DCE is correct in stressing the cultural aspects of death, its adoption of cardiac-oriented criteria raises several problems. There are problems with its notion of a 'death process', which purportedly begins with brain death and ends with cessation of cardiac function, and there are serious problems regarding its commitment to a cardiac-oriented definition whilst permitting transplantation when the (...)
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  30.  4
    A. Brueckner (2003). Not Wanting to Know. Analysis 63 (3):250-256.
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  31.  26
    Robert Audi (1973). The Concept of Wanting. Philosophical Studies 24 (1):1 - 21.
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  32.  28
    Sharon M. Kaye (2004). Why the Liberty of Indifference Is Worth Wanting: Buridan's Ass, Friendship, and Peter John Olivi. History of Philosophy Quarterly 21 (1):21 - 42.
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  33.  58
    Randolph Clarke (2010). Willing, Wanting, Waiting * by Richard Holton. [REVIEW] Analysis 71 (1):191-193.
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  34.  12
    Michael Clark (1993). On Wanting to Be Morally Perfect. Analysis 53 (1):54 - 56.
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  35.  45
    Helen Steward (2010). Holton, Richard . Willing, Wanting, Waiting . Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2009. Pp. 203. $49.95 (Cloth). Ethics 120 (3):604-608.
  36.  15
    Arthur R. Miller (1980). Wanting, Intending, and Knowing What One is Doing. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 40 (3):334-343.
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  37.  11
    Rupert Read (2001). On Wanting to Say, “All We Need Is a Paradigm.”. The Harvard Review of Philosophy 9 (1):88-105.
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  38.  21
    Nir Eisikovits (2012). Willing, Wanting, Waiting by Richard Holton. [REVIEW] Journal of Moral Philosophy 9 (4):603-606.
    What is a disability? What sorts of limitations do persons with disabilities or impairments experience? What is there about having a disability or impairment that makes it disadvantageous for the individuals with it? Are persons with severe cognitive impairments capable of making autonomous decisions? What role should disability play in the construction of theories of justice? Is it ever ethical for parents to seek to create a child with an impairment? This anthology addresses these and other questions and is a (...)
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  39.  10
    Anders Kruse Ljungdalh (2013). Stultitia and Type 2 Diabetes: The Madness of Not Wanting to Care for the Self. Foucault Studies:154-174.
    This paper explores the condition of stultitia, which is described by Michel Foucault in The Hermeneutics of the Subject as a condition one is in, before having started to care for the self. The purpose is to shed light on one of the paradoxes of patient education by introducing and elaborating an aspect of Foucault’s literary activities, which has not, to my knowledge, been investigated empirically before. To illustrate this condition, the paper targets the relation between type 2 diabetes, contemporary (...)
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  40.  17
    Ann E. Cudd (2012). Wanting Freedom. Journal of Social Philosophy 43 (4):367-385.
  41.  10
    Peter van Inwagen (2009). Naturalistic Explanations of Religion Are as Old as Xenophanes (570–480bc). The Most Famous Are Probably Those of Feuerbach, Marx, and Freud. I Must Confess That I Don't Find These Three Famous Explanations of Religion Very Interesting. 1 Large Parts of Them Are Unintelligible (This is Particularly True of Feuerbach's Writings on Religion) and the Parts That Are Intelligible Are Vague and Untestable (Feuerbach and Freud), or Else They Demand Allegiance to Some Very Comprehensive Theory That has Been Tried and Found Wanting on Grounds Unrelated to Religion (Marx's Theory of the Dialectics of History and Freud's Psychology). [REVIEW] In Jeffrey Schloss & Michael J. Murray (eds.), The Believing Primate: Scientific, Philosophical, and Theological Reflections on the Origin of Religion. Oxford University Press
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  42.  8
    Saul Smilansky (1990). Discussion: Is Libertarian Free Will Worth Wanting? Philosophical Investigations 13 (3):273-276.
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  43.  14
    Wayne A. Davis (1982). Miller on Wanting, Intending, and Being Willing. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 43 (1):107-110.
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  44.  20
    Carl Ginet (2009). Review of Richard Holton, Willing, Wanting, Waiting. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2009 (11).
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  45.  16
    James Rachels (1969). Wanting and Willing. Philosophical Studies 20 (1-2):9 - 13.
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  46.  19
    D. Z. Phillips (1977). On Wanting to Compare Wittgenstein and Zen. Philosophy 52 (201):338 - 343.
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  47.  3
    Katy Price (2008). It's Wanting To Know That Makes Us Matter. Metascience 17 (1):159-163.
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  48.  16
    Mark Thornton (1989). Book Review:Elbow Room: The Varieties of Free Will Worth Wanting Daniel C. Dennett. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 56 (3):543-.
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  49.  17
    D. Hammes (2011). Reviews: Milton's Positivism Found Wanting. [REVIEW] Philosophy of the Social Sciences 41 (3):398-419.
    Milton Friedman’s 1953 essay created controversy and consternation amongst economists. It provided a prescription, based on empirically generated predictive success, of how to do economics, yet many saw it as a concession of the search for truth and theoretical beauty within the discipline. This article reviews a 50th anniversary festschrift devoted to views of the essay. The purpose of the volume is to provide today’s reader with the essay, responses, and a guide to interpreting it. The volume is selective and (...)
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  50.  20
    Mary Magada-Ward (2009). On Wanting to Write This as Rose Selavy: Reflections on Sherrie Levine and Peircian Semiotic. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 23 (1):pp. 28-39.
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